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Attention all boxmakers: new lid liner technique

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  • Attention all boxmakers: new lid liner technique

    For those of you who make boxes that use a flat lid with the same profile as the box body, and a lid liner to keep it in place, I discovered a really easy way to make sure that the lid liner doesn't slip out of position during gluing. This method also ensures that the lid will match the contour of the box body very closely.

    I will eventually make a short video of the steps, but in the meantime I posted the method and pictures on my blog earlier today.

    I found, with the bowl book, that I kept on making new discoveries long after the book was out, and apparently this process is starting with the box book as well. Maybe you need to work in a specific area for a long time to reach the next generation of techniques. At any rate, check it out if you think it will be useful to you. Just click on the link under my name.

    I'm thinking of doing a series of short videos on tips and tricks that were discovered post-book--some are obvious, but some are not. I guess I'm just a ham at heart, and iMovie makes the editing a snap.
    Carole

    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by handibunny View Post
    I discovered a really easy way to make sure that the lid liner doesn't slip out of position during gluing. This method also ensures that the lid will match the contour of the box body very closely.

    I'm thinking of doing a series of short videos on tips and tricks that were discovered post-book--some are obvious, but some are not.
    Nice teaser. I'll stay tuned, as it sounds like good info that I could put to use.
    Mtnman Jim

    taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

    Comment


    • #3
      clever6613-1.gif That should work great........usually I slice off a 1/4 piece from the center cut out for the lid liner but as you say its a bugger to get it glued on to a T, especially after sanding the interior a bit.
      Who knew going in reverse was the better way......thanks for sharing a sweeeet idea once again. Nice guitar box Joe, any scrolling books in your future?
      Gloria ............... Two memorable things to say in life, "Hello" for the first time, and "Good-bye" for the last.

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      • #4
        DUH! Not too bright today (like normal). OK, went to your blog. Thanks!!!!
        Mtnman Jim

        taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the shape of your guitar box...
          2 more weeks and I can start making saw dust again....

          Trout
          Hawk G-4 Jetcraft
          Fish are food, not friends!

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Carole. That is simply your best idea yet and it follows the KISS principle perfectly.

            george
            A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
            George

            delta 650, hawk G426

            Comment


            • #7
              Carole,
              You have to stop solving all of our challenges! Leave some problems for us to solve.

              I havn't been to your blog for a while, lots of good stuff.

              Thanks

              Joes desk looks beautiful!.
              Rolf
              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks, everyone, for checking out the blog post. I felt a little lazy doing it that way, but it took forever getting the captions where I wanted them, and I didn't want to have to do it all over again.

                Trout--that's Joe's box, not mine. He's been my official "tester" for a while, and doesn't do a bad job with the "small stuff".

                Rolf--Joe has made 5 of those desks so far. For a relatively new woodworker, he's turning out some really nice work--and giving me places to put my stuff. I'm glad you liked the blog. I try to post fairly regularly, but also try to make each post meaningful, and not "what I had for breakfast" or "my thoughts on life". See you next week at Saratoga!
                Carole

                Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Brilliant! Brilliant! Thank you!!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another option (I learned this from Kevin Daly) is to put a weight in the bottom of the box, put the lid liner over that, put glue on the lid liner avoiding the edge areas, clamp or tape the lid in it's correct position and invert the box... the lid liner will end up glued to the lid while the lid is in its proper place.

                    Spence

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This is one of those "Duh, why didn't I think of that." I also read down further about the tightening knob for the hegner saw. If anyone has this saw and are having problems with the blades "popping" check the end of the knob. If the little round thingy (real technical, huh?) that turns isn't on the end or doesn't turn, you need a new knob. This is what actually holds the blade in place.
                      Betty

                      "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What's not technical about "thingy"?
                        Carole

                        Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Awesome!! I hope to try this technique over the weekend!!!!!!
                          Cathy in NE

                          "While we try to teach our children all about life, our children teach us what life is all about." - Anonymous

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                          • #14
                            Great idea Carole! - all the good things in life are simple in essence - my wife tells me this all the time when she 'compliments' me - LOL!

                            I'll definitely be using this technique in the future.
                            Thanks for the enlightenment.
                            Jim in Mexico

                            Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                            - Albert Einstein

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'll be interested in knowing how this new approach works out for those of you who give it a try.

                              The longer I do this stuff, the more I tend to turn away from printed patterns, and use the pieces themselves as patterns for parts that occur later down the road, as is done with traditional woodworking.

                              I had some bad experiences, early on, with patterns that were useless once earlier components were cut and sanded. That's why I like using the box body as the pattern for the lid. And keeping that liner in perfect alignment, was, for me,always a multi-stage process of gluing, clamping, checking, adjusting, etc. I wanted to help Joe get the best fit possible for his box, and letting the tail wag the dog suddenly seemed so obvious I was amazed that I had not thought of it before.

                              Once of the advantages of being a relatively new scroller with decent, but not outstanding skills, is that I have to design my projects so people like me can have success. That's why I drill out the ends of bow loops, rather than try to cut a smooth circle, and do other things that are "idiot-proof".

                              I think that often people who have been doing things for a long time, and are masters of technique, have trouble writing for the average person. An article in a professional food service journal called this "unconscious competence", where things are done so automatically that it's hard to even recall that they're being done.

                              Just my assorted thoughts. Thanks for bearing with me.
                              Carole

                              Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                              Comment

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