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Gluing width to pattern

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  • Gluing width to pattern

    Has any one addrd to width scroolSawl board when u have 6 inch board and pattern calls fo r 8 inch in with i have proper length?

    Paul Shank

  • #2
    If I'm understanding your question, it sounds like you have a 6" wide board and an 8" wide pattern. If that is the case, then you can make the board wider by edge glueing another board of the same length to the 6" wide one. You will need the proper clamps to accomplish this.

    What I usually do is cut the boards to a rough length, a little longer than what I need. Then I glue and clamp 2 boards together that are wider than my final dimension, taking some care to try & match up grain patterns so the joint blends in as well as possible. This gives me a piece that is longer and wider than what I need, and then I can trim it to exact dimensions, after the glue has dried.

    You will probably need to do a bit of sanding to level out the area around the glue joint. It can be hard to get the two boards perfectly flush. If done well, most folks won't be able to tell where the joint was.
    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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    • #3
      Like Bill suggested edge gluing a section to make it wider is the way to go. Unless you are perfect on alignment you will have to do some surface adjusting, either with a sander or if you have one a thicknesser planer. With a bit of care on how the grain goes and any grain pattern direction a lot of times you can match the two quite closely and the join will be neigh on to being invisible.

      DW
      Life is hard. It is even harder when you are being stupid.
      John Wayne

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      • #4
        I will sometimes if the wood is at least a 1/2' thick use bisquits to reinforce the edge joint. If you have a jointer or a router it is a good practice to joint the edges to be joined to make a near perfect fit.
        "Still Montana Mike"

        "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
        Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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        • #5
          Will it stop me from making scroll saw bowls from Carole pattern

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          • #6
            Not at all!
            "Still Montana Mike"

            "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
            Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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            • #7
              Paul I have joined lots of boards together just like Bill and DW have said...in fact I did some today. Allot of time's we just do not have a wide enough board so we have to make it wide. Making sure the two edges that will be joined are flat and straight are very important. Of course you will need wood clamps to hold them together. Be careful when you attach the clamps as you do not want the boards to bow in the middle. Don't worry about the pieces not staying together. That glue joint will be stronger than the wood itself. I have made many 12" - 18" wide scrolled bowls using Carole's idea's without a problem.
              Hawaiilad
              Larry

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              • #8
                Thank for all your help Paul Shank

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                • #9
                  You might consider resizing the pattern to fit the board too.

                  Roger

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul Shank View Post
                    Will it stop me from making scroll saw bowls from Carole pattern
                    Use this as an opportunity for embellishment. Instead of just adding a similar board to the edge, add a strip of something different to make things interesting.

                    One of the most interesting things to me about Carole's bowl patterns is the different effects she gets from laminating patterns in the wood and then extruding them to the 3D shape.

                    --Rob

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                    • #11
                      Paul,

                      The advice you're being given is good. I've made bowls from glued up strips of the same wood if they were too narrow. You can also glue up contrasting pieces of wood, as long as everything ends up the same thickness.

                      If you glue up your pieces of wood, then sand them, you might find that they are a little thinner than they should be. If that happens, you have to change the cutting angle. If you have trouble figuring out how to do that, send me a private message or use my blog email and I'll help you figure it out.
                      Carole

                      Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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