Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

wooden chain - wood selection

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • wooden chain - wood selection

    It just occurred to me that I have an almost infinite supply of blanks that are already exactly the right size to make scrolled chains--but they're hickory. Could I scroll hickory? What blade would I use?

    (Although I've announced my intention to cut chain blanks with a hand saw, I would ask my neighbor to use his table saw on the hickory. It's so hard my axe barely makes a dent in it. OK, I got the axe at Walmart so it's not the sharpest blade ever, but still.)

    Thanks!
    Mindy
    "Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you'll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world." - Julius Schwartz, DC Comics pioneer, 1915-2004

  • #2
    You can scroll hickory but as you have noted it is extremely dense. Would not be my first choice especially for this project. If you decide to cut it I'd use a #7 Skip tooth blade or a #7 fd (flying dutchmen) UR (Ultra reverse). God luck and let us know how it comes out.
    "Still Montana Mike"

    "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
    Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, Mike. I'll think about that and let you know if I try it. I'm still burning...um, cutting...my way through the snowman tray puzzle. (Forgot tape.) I would like to try the chain, though. Maybe with something a little easier to cut, let alone sand...
      "Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you'll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world." - Julius Schwartz, DC Comics pioneer, 1915-2004

      Comment


      • #4
        Mindy, hickory also has a very definite grain, which may pull your tools away from the line you're cutting on. Might be a better choice to use something less demanding, at least for the first chain.
        Carole

        Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, Carole. It sounds like I should try something else. I thought of it because I have hundreds of 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 12"-ish pieces in my garage. (My neighbor knows an Amish buggy maker who sells us his scraps really cheap; we burn them in our fireplaces and chimineas. Burns hot and clean and smells nice.) But I'm not opposed to hacking up something else. We just did a similar chain project for the carving magazine and those pieces are finished so beautifully that I know I wouldn't be happy if I churned out something ugly just to save myself the effort of cutting a blank.
          "Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you'll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world." - Julius Schwartz, DC Comics pioneer, 1915-2004

          Comment


          • #6
            Basswood is an Ideal choice! Its the stuff that popcicle sticks are made of. It is fine grained and easy to carve. When I doing carving I make my blanks from it. Basswood also stains well as any kid wold know for eatting a popcicle.

            Also it the wood cracks while craving, it can be glued with thin cynoacrilic (super) glue with no glue line visable. I would use Hot Shot Red.

            After learning on Basswood and perfecting your techinques you could try a more challedging wood like Hickory, Jatoba, , or Purple Heart.

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks, Dave!
              "Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you'll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world." - Julius Schwartz, DC Comics pioneer, 1915-2004

              Comment


              • #8
                I made 2 projects out of hickory and it is a bear to cut. It's used for baseball bats for a reason! #7 ST blades are the minimum size I would use and then you will go through a lot of them.

                george
                A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                George

                delta 650, hawk G426

                Comment


                • #9
                  I guess my thoughts are different than the majority here.. but I think if you get a nice straight grained hickory blank with no knots in it, you shouldnt have any trouble cutting the wooden chains in it once your neighbor preps the blank for you (cuts the 4 corners like in step one ). For the majority of your cutting on the scrollsaw you will be cutting through a thickness of 1/2 inch, and 1/2 inch thick hickory cuts beautifully in my opinion. You will have a few places where you are cutting through the complete 1 1/2 inch thickness, but not a lot. I would try it in a heartbeat. As for blade, I would use a #5 or a #7 flying D Polar blade.
                  Perhaps one day we can talk a trade, maybe a bunch of your hickory blanks for something special from WI?????
                  Dale w/ yella saws

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Food for thought. Thanks, Dale. And I'm absolutely willing to trade you some hickory. E-mail me and we'll work a deal.
                    "Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you'll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world." - Julius Schwartz, DC Comics pioneer, 1915-2004

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hickory - Pecan

                      Well if you do not know better it works. JC, Mary and Joesph along with the lamp/sheppard are cut from Pecan using the FD #5UR.

                      As Mike said - let the blade do the work. Hickory and pecan in Texas are both the same hardness for my experience. If the chain is done - it will last. That wood is very stable. And it finishes out beautifully with tounge oil.

                      go for it
                      Attached Files

                      Comment

                      Unconfigured Ad Widget

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      • Jim Finn
                        Reply to Farmers market "survey"
                        by Jim Finn
                        The fees here in Lubbock Texas are $45 per year plus $15 per 10' x 10' space each Saturday that I show up. . Crafters are limited to number and type (to avoid duplication, competition) Any kind of set up allowed, meaning, tent or truck or trailer. No insurance requirements, just a sellers permit from...
                        Today, 04:48 PM
                      • MidMich324
                        Reply to Plastic puzzle
                        by MidMich324
                        Using Corel Draw a 10 inch round acrylic jigsaw puzzle was created. It was the cut on an Epilog Laser. Two passes were used to cut thru 1/4 acrylic so as not to melt the plastic. Only one person has put it together so far. It is about 475 pieces. But would really like to try and cut one by...
                        Today, 03:57 PM
                      • RJweb
                        Reply to I admit it... I splurged on a new "toy"
                        by RJweb
                        As far as the Incra miter gauge, if you keep it 1/4 inch away you will be fine, but you will have to adjust it when doing angle cuts, it’s a great miter gauge, RJ...
                        Today, 03:42 PM
                      • Linda In Phoenix
                        Farmers market "survey"
                        by Linda In Phoenix
                        Curiosity regarding farmers markets.
                        I have only looked into a few, and I know that each one has different requirements.
                        For those of you who do them, what are 'typical' requirements for yours?

                        The nearest one to me that might have potential, and allows crafters requires:...
                        Today, 11:14 AM
                      • Linda In Phoenix
                        Reply to Farmers market
                        by Linda In Phoenix
                        Truly a nice display. I'm happy for you! Our nearest 2 farmers markets are still food items only as county and city covid rules are still being applied. Our best nearby one is on county parks department property and they haven't lifted essential business and crowd restrictions yet. But the food...
                        Today, 11:00 AM
                      Working...
                      X