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Went bowling -- first timer

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  • Went bowling -- first timer

    I've jumped into bowls. I have about an 80 average -- still working toward the perfect game -- a 300 bowl.

    Carole -- you have inspired me with your beautiful works. Dave, Polydraw helped me to have some fun creating patterns I would never have drawn on my own.

    I've got a few problems that are evident in the pics. 1 -- I occasionally get some glue around the edges in the inside. It impacts the oil finish I've used on them. Tried to sand it out. The square bowl (one of Carole's beginner pattterns) shows both some glue problems and my inability to keep a consistent thickness. Suggestions are welcome!

    The 7 lobe oval bowl patterns were created using Polydraw. Thanks Dave!

    Now to graduate to gluing up some wood for more interesting patterns.
    Attached Files
    Mtnman Jim

    taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

  • #2
    I would glue to the outside of the rings. That way it is easier to clean up/sand off. Use some mineral spirits, or plain water, on a rag to wipeoff. I have a set of dental tools that I got at a woodworking show and use them to scrape off the squeeze out then wipe off. If the glue is still there when I oil, I use a piece of sand paper to sand off the glue, then reoil. It appears that you are using too much glue causing the great amount of squeeze out. You might try dipping a toothpick in the glue then running a line of glue on the wood. You really don't need a whole lot of glue, just weigh down when done gluing and allow to try. I use either my son's dumbell weights or my chilton's auto manual.
    Betty

    "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

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    • #3
      Jim,

      You're off to a good start. I never bowled past 70, myself.

      I've found it helpful to complete the sanding on the inside lower rings before gluing on the base. Then, I give the bowl about 5 minutes for the glue to set up (I use a press, but Chilton's will do), remove the bowl, and clean up squeeze out before it sets. If it's messy, I'll even use a damp paper towel to remove residue, being careful not to dilute the glue. The I replace the clamps/weights.

      Before applying the first coat of finish, I often check for glue spots with mineral spirits, marking any places with white chalk, then sanding them. I sometimes use sandpaper at the end of a thin file to get close to the sides. Also, I like to use a sealer coat of shellac. That really makes any spots pop so you can get them before you complete the finishing.

      As far as uneven sides, just keep practicing. You can go pretty thin with the sides, 1/8" or so, before ruining the bowl.

      Looking forward to seeing the next batch--but these look pretty good to me!
      Carole

      Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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      • #4
        One of the things you can do is lightly coat the bottom around the edges that you are gluing with a light coat of tung oil or danish oil and let it fully harden. What this does is seal the color of the wood and if you do get some glue squeeze out on the base it does not effect the color of the wood when the oil hits the rest of the project.

        DW
        Life is hard. It is even harder when you are being stupid.
        John Wayne

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        • #5
          I found a variation to Corol's method. Instead of taking the bowl out of the press to wash it. I cut a hole in the bottom of the press and wasj it in place. If I need a smaller hole, I will cover it up with another piece of plywood. Got the idea from looking at a spidle sander.


          Dave

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          • #6
            Thanks for the tips. I'll give them a try. Also, I'm going to make a bowl press -- as that will make glue-up easier than my stack of stuff I've been using.
            Mtnman Jim

            taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

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            • #7
              Nice work, Jim.
              Put the bowl in the press with the largest ring down and the smallest on top and gravity drops any interior squeeze out. I still have sanding to do so that pretty much removes any glue.

              When you make the press wax it heavily a few times. Makes cleaning off glue drops a snap.
              Terry
              Got Moose?

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              • #8
                Terry, if you use wax paper or baking parchment circles above and below the rings, you'll never have to clean up glue, or risk gluing the rings to the press--that would not be fun!
                Carole

                Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Welcome to the Club Jim....you will soon be hooked. When I started making larger bowls...12" - 18" I started making the sides 3/8" - 1/2" thick...why, because I was sanding though the sides!!!! When making smaller bowls, I still making the sides thin. I also find when I round over the edges of the bowls, it will hide a thin area. I was thinking today while working on bandsaw boxes, I have not make a bowl for awhile and I miss it...
                  Hawaiilad
                  Larry

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                  • #10
                    Carole, you are absolutely correct. I find I get the same result by waxing the bowl press. The glue drops just slide tight off, and nothing sticks to the press.

                    I just really enjoy the bowls. Made about 52 so far, short, tall, round, square, wavy, spalted, variegated. On to extreme morphing.

                    Your book and Dave's Scroll Mania Polydraw and Angle Calculator have really helped. Got a digital caliper to get good measurements, and an angle guage to set the drill press and the saw blade angle and really cut down the sanding.

                    Dave's comment about the cornucopia got me thinking of other designs. OK, cue the Whats A Grecian Earn vaudeville about here. Did do one with a much oversize top ring cut vertical on the outside and tapered on the inside, looks like it needs a geranium or a potted palm.

                    Great fun. Addicting.
                    Terry
                    Got Moose?

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                    • #11
                      Nice work on the bowls, Jim
                      Fran

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the tips on the bowl press. Knowing me, I'd end up gluing the press to the bowl.
                        Mtnman Jim

                        taking life as it comes and trying to make the best of it

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