Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Finishing a bowl on a lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Finishing a bowl on a lathe

    I'm very excited about this idea. Have been trying to figure out how to take some of the work out of finishing scrolled bowls and finally arrived at this.
    This is a 9 1/2 inch diameter maple bowl which I cut out, glued together, and now have it on the lathe for finishing.

    This is not a new idea. There are many segmented turners out there.

    Project is not completed, but very pleased with how symmetrical the bowl is turning out. Since I starting with glued up rings, and not hollowing out the bowl, there is much less material to remove. Interior is far from finished, but thought I would share the idea.


    SQ
    Attached Files
    Last edited by susieq4131; 08-25-2011, 06:16 PM.
    If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

  • #2
    SQ,

    Cutting stacked rings then finishing them on the lathe has been around for a long time. When I was doing research for the bowl book, I found a book published in 1975 by Dale Nish, who has quite a pedigree as a turner and author. The book described the process, including a discussion of angles.

    Turners tend to use the bandsaw to cut the rings, and just glue up the entry cuts. If you make the cuts as scarf joints, they pretty well disappear. I think Rolf has used the lathe to finish off bowls made from glued up rings. It certainly makes sense to do it that way. When I looked for sanding equipment for my bowls, I turned to the lathe literature to find the pad sander that I had seen illustrated in a book. There is a version that's made for use with the lathe.

    Since you're accomplished with using the lathe, maybe you can start incorporating decorative turned elements on the sides and take the bowls to a new level. I love seeing all the wonderful innovations that are evolving, and look forward to seeing the directions you take with your bowl-making.
    Carole

    Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Great looking bowl.
      Linda

      Comment


      • #4
        I too am experimenting with the same thing. I had tried unsuccessfully to mount the bowl on the drill press using a face plate so I just picked up a lathe at Harbor Freight not to long ago for this purpose. I'm sure I'll try my hand at a couple of other things now that I have it .

        I just tried it out for the first time last night and I glued it up similar to how you show. I thought I'd try and clean up the outside with my gouge and after a few minutes I saw my bowl go flying and shatter as the hot glue I used sheared right off the face block; scared the you know what right out of me. I won't be trying it that way again until I get a chuck to hold it in place securely. I have another already glued up that I'll be working on tonight, but will be only sanding this one.

        Nice bowl you have there as always!!
        Attached Files
        Don

        An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.
        Benjamin Franklin

        At twenty years of age the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.
        Benjamin Franklin

        A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.
        Benjamin Franklin

        www.dogwoodstudiosnh.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Glad it was only the bowl that got broken!
          Carole

          Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks. You and I both!!! Thankfully it went flying towards the back of the lathe and not at me. I think I'll save this as a reminder to be sure to wear my face shield.
            Don

            An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.
            Benjamin Franklin

            At twenty years of age the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.
            Benjamin Franklin

            A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.
            Benjamin Franklin

            www.dogwoodstudiosnh.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by handibunny View Post
              SQ,

              Cutting stacked rings then finishing them on the lathe has been around for a long time. When I was doing research for the bowl book, I found a book published in 1975 by Dale Nish, who has quite a pedigree as a turner and author. The book described the process, including a discussion of angles.

              Turners tend to use the bandsaw to cut the rings, and just glue up the entry cuts. If you make the cuts as scarf joints, they pretty well disappear. I think Rolf has used the lathe to finish off bowls made from glued up rings. It certainly makes sense to do it that way. When I looked for sanding equipment for my bowls, I turned to the lathe literature to find the pad sander that I had seen illustrated in a book. There is a version that's made for use with the lathe.

              Since you're accomplished with using the lathe, maybe you can start incorporating decorative turned elements on the sides and take the bowls to a new level. I love seeing all the wonderful innovations that are evolving, and look forward to seeing the directions you take with your bowl-making.
              I agree with you Carole, and think this is going to take them to the next level. I not real experienced with the lathe other than some pen turning. So I'm still learning but really like what I see.

              Not every bowl I finished on the tilting spindle sander was perfectly shaped. So these less than perfect bowls are a great resource for practice and even hope to salvage a few of them.

              Turning is certainly a lot easier on my thumbs, than finishing them on the tilting spindle sander like I was doing. I had to take many months off to give my thumbs a much needed break.

              I am back making bowls (my first love) and absolutely love it.

              SQ
              If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by AirNationalGuardMom View Post
                Great looking bowl.
                Linda
                Thanks! It's a new technique - for me, but I'm really enjoying it.

                SQ
                Last edited by susieq4131; 08-25-2011, 06:15 PM.
                If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jowshu98 View Post
                  I too am experimenting with the same thing. I had tried unsuccessfully to mount the bowl on the drill press using a face plate so I just picked up a lathe at Harbor Freight not to long ago for this purpose. I'm sure I'll try my hand at a couple of other things now that I have it .

                  I just tried it out for the first time last night and I glued it up similar to how you show. I thought I'd try and clean up the outside with my gouge and after a few minutes I saw my bowl go flying and shatter as the hot glue I used sheared right off the face block; scared the you know what right out of me. I won't be trying it that way again until I get a chuck to hold it in place securely. I have another already glued up that I'll be working on tonight, but will be only sanding this one.

                  Nice bowl you have there as always!!
                  Once you get the bugs worked out, you will be happy with the results. I have found it's really important to find the center on the bottom of the bowl. I use this technique to find the center. These machines are powerful! Glad to hear you weren't hurt.

                  How to Find the Center of a Circle - YouTube

                  These machines are powerful! Glad to hear you weren't hurt.

                  Looking forward to seeing your turned bowls!

                  SQ
                  Last edited by susieq4131; 08-25-2011, 09:35 PM.
                  If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As I was reading SQ's post I was thinking of what might happen with the glued up rings when using tools against them on the lathe....then I read Don's post. I have never used a lathe...tried a couple times and knew I needed some training, so I stopped before I hurt myself. I'm sure others have done the same thing SQ and Don are doing, but please be careful. I have way to many friends that have gotten hurt from items flying off the lathe.
                    Hawaiilad
                    Larry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hawaiilad View Post
                      As I was reading SQ's post I was thinking of what might happen with the glued up rings when using tools against them on the lathe....then I read Don's post. I have never used a lathe...tried a couple times and knew I needed some training, so I stopped before I hurt myself. I'm sure others have done the same thing SQ and Don are doing, but please be careful. I have way to many friends that have gotten hurt from items flying off the lathe.
                      Larry, you are so right! Can't be too careful around a lathe or for that matter, other shop equipment.

                      I use Titebond III for gluing up the rings on the bowls. With the bowl press from Carole's book, I get a nice tight bond. I don't want anything flying off either.

                      Especially with segmented bowls, I use the slowest speed when turning, which is recommended.

                      My husband has a lot of turning experience, so he has been a wonderful
                      resource. I couldn't have gotten started without him.


                      SQ
                      If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In high school wood shop I was turning a 12 in plate when it broke free and went sailing like a wooden Frisbee. Lucky no one was in the way and no one got hurt. Definitely does not hurt to be extra careful around the lathe.

                        DW
                        Life is hard. It is even harder when you are being stupid.
                        John Wayne

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I knew you would be careful SQ....must be nice to have someone in the family that can help teach you in the use of the lathe....about the only tool I have not learned to use. Can't wait to see the new things you do with the lathe.
                          Hawaiilad
                          Larry

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One of the good things about making bowls without the lathe is the greater tolerance for glue-ups that are less than perfect. On some of my segmented bowls, both regular and open, there are places where the wood joints are fine for sanders, but I would not for a minute dare to put them on the lathe.

                            BTW, the lathe literature is a great place to get ideas of bowls. I used a few of them for inspiration when writing the bowl book.

                            If I had room in my garage, I'd get a lathe, but since I have no one to teach me, and the community shop has two, it just doesn't make sense.

                            Looking forward to seeing your new work, SQ. You are indeed lucky to have an on-site mentor!
                            Carole

                            Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DWSudekum View Post
                              In high school wood shop I was turning a 12 in plate when it broke free and went sailing like a wooden Frisbee. Lucky no one was in the way and no one got hurt. Definitely does not hurt to be extra careful around the lathe.

                              DW
                              That could have been a disaster. Thank goodness, no one was hurt.

                              I had originally thought about turning some of my not so perfect early bowls, but have decided not to since I wasn't using titebond III at that time, and I don't trust the glue I used. I think they have a better chance of separating and flying off.

                              Appreciate your comments.

                              SQ
                              If you can't fix it with sawdust and glue, it's not worth fixing.

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • will8989
                                Reply to Farmers market "survey"
                                by will8989
                                This market is run a little different than most. All monies collected go back into the market. Each month they put on a different event to draw in people. The budget is usually $600 in the busy months. The pavilion is well maintained with sides that pull down in the colder months. The only time Sunday...
                                Today, 01:41 AM
                              • cwmagee
                                Pegas Large Scrollsaw Table
                                by cwmagee
                                A couple of months ago I ordered the Large Pegas Scroll Saw Table for my EX21 from Denny which I received about a week later. I installed it immediately and made a few test cuts. Since then I have been busy with several Urban renewal projects around house as well putting the yard to bed for the winter....
                                Yesterday, 07:28 PM
                              • Rolf
                                Reply to I admit it... I splurged on a new "toy"
                                by Rolf
                                Back in the late 90's I bought a Incra 2000 Miter gauge. Incredibly precise. The problem was that it only adjusted in one direction, It rarely gets used. It locks in to half degrees. More recently I bought a Kreg fence which has a pin that precisely locates the frequently used angles.
                                That is...
                                Yesterday, 08:15 AM
                              • Jimern
                                Reply to Farmers market "survey"
                                by Jimern
                                The crafters market here in Kerrville, TX is $25 per 10x10 spot per event. We sell 8 months out of the year, Jun/Jul is too hot, and Jan/Feb is too cold. No insurance requirement but we do have to show a sales tax permit and collect sales tax.

                                Personally I would never sell in a venue that...
                                Yesterday, 06:29 AM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to Farmers market "survey"
                                by will8989
                                The one I do is under a pavilion on County Property, about 60 spaces. They run 4 “seasons”, spring 6 weeks, summer May - mid September, fall sept to Mid November, and holiday fare Mid November until end of year. Cost is $75 per season, per day as they are open Saturday and Sunday. If you are called...
                                10-20-2020, 11:10 PM
                              Working...
                              X