Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

And now for the questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • And now for the questions

    I saw a "practice pattern" to learn how to operate my saw. I decided to print out what I thought was a fairly simple pattern that would cover all the cuts and possibly have something at the end. Please tell me that the pattern lines are really just suggestions. Improvisation is acceptable.
    Also, I was trying various blades. How do you install a spiral blade? There must be a trick or something. When I clamp the bottom the blade is at a terrible angle, not allowing me to clamp the top.
    Thank you in advance for any information you are willing to share. I know that this is only the beginning, but, I will put everyones knowledge to good use.

  • #2
    Any variations from the pattern toward the scrap side do not count as mistakes. AND, other cuts off the pattern are artistic interpretations! Seriously, once you remove the pattern, only you know where it was not on the lines (unless you're doing lettering).
    Second, take a couple of sets of needle nose and get the ends of your spirals parallel.
    There are people who swear by spirals and others who swear at them. [I am some where in the middle]
    Jim
    When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
    Too early to leave, too late to call in.

    Comment


    • #3
      in theory the practice lines are perfection, the truth is the closer you get to following them, the better off you will be in the future. That said I get bored easily, so I think I did them twice.

      There are spirals and there are spirals, I rarely use them but there is one that has flat ends on the blade, that makes it much easier to mount in the saw.

      The blade though, does make a difference (as does the wood and your feed rate). I used Flying Dutchman blades when I started, then Pegas Modified Geometry came out and I tried them. Never went back. My goto blade is a #3, regardless of the thickness of the wood, or the wood type.

      It takes time, practice and try different blades to see which you can control the best.
      Jim
      Texas - The Republic
      With the exception of hand guns and Tequila, computers have caused more problems than anything else

      Comment


      • #4
        Following a line is like driving , look a bit ahead of where you are going and gently steer toward that point. Some blades will not cut straight because of how they were manufactured. typically the will cut to your right as you face the saw. I sit slightly to the right of center to compensate.
        Remember once you remove the pattern you cant tell if you were on the line or not, unless you cut off a critical piece. What saw are you using?
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          In my opinion, the only perfect lines you need to cut are circles. Everything else is just artist interpretation.
          Betty

          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

          Comment


          • #6
            The lines matter if you are making a multi-layer project if you need things to line up, otherwise it's artist's interpretation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Improvisation is certainly acceptable, but some patterns are less forgiving than others. As someone else already said, learn to follow the lines as closely as possible. If you wander from the pattern lines, it is usually best if it is intentional. It takes some time and practice, so don't get too discouraged.

              As for spirals, they can be an acquired taste. I use 2 pair of needle nose pliers to untwist each end, to get a flat area for setting into the blade clamps. But even then, you need to get both ends flat in the same vertical plane. Even flat end spirals may need some tweaking to get both ends lined up. It's just part of the price of admission for the hobby and the use of spirals. If you think getting them into the clamps is fun, wait until you start cutting with them. 😁

              Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

              Comment


              • #8
                In another site someone said just cut and to correct with sanding. To put it in SLRA’s words sanding is a finishing step and not a correction step. I have a problem seeing fuzzies more than a line that is slightly off. As for spirals, I’ve ruined some fretwork cuttings and stopped using them. We just don’t get along.
                Betty

                "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

                Comment


                • #9
                  When the profile is a simple one--lines or circles--it's often prudent to cut just to the outside of the line, then sand to the line with a belt or spindle sander. This not only increases precision, but provides a smooth surface. However, I view this as a technique, not an excuse for sloppy cutting.
                  Carole

                  Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There are certain projects, like text, where stray cutting really pops out at you. Arcs, circles and longer straight lines also show more.
                    As MarkDavid said projects that require things to fit together are precision critical (Intarsia)
                    Rolf
                    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With Intarsia, you need to cut on the line or better one side of the line. If you don't ,you will have gaps .

                      Personally, I would not start with a spiral blade. Get experience with a skip tooth or reverse type blade.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        With practice for intarsia I actually TRY to split the line. but you have to be consistent. Mostly I use as thin a blade as possible and cut down the center of the line. A Pegas MGT #1 R is .010 inches thick and the actual kerf is .011 so every time you cut an Intarsia piece you lose that wood. On larger projects that adds up. That is why splitting or cutting on the outer edge of the of the line becomes significant for fit.

                        But for a beginner this is too much information.
                        Rolf
                        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                        Comment

                        Unconfigured Ad Widget

                        Collapse

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        • Linda In Phoenix
                          Reply to My computer issues.
                          by Linda In Phoenix
                          Rolf, if your Picassa file works I want it!!! They cram so much into newer programs that it just complicates things and takes away intuitive stuff. Thank you for checking!
                          Today, 05:55 PM
                        • Rolf
                          Reply to My computer issues.
                          by Rolf
                          Linda,
                          Quote, I kept my old computer even though it was barely alive simply due to one particular program...Picassa by Google...which they removed from the market years ago. It worked like a combo photo and editing program but easier. It could take a photo and change it to a line drawing beautifully...
                          Today, 08:41 AM
                        • RJweb
                          Reply to My computer issues.
                          by RJweb
                          Buy an apple and keep the computer dr away, RJ...
                          Today, 08:39 AM
                        • Rolf
                          Reply to New turning tools
                          by Rolf
                          Thanks for posting Carole, Depending on what other time consuming distractions I have I might just have to do a wavy bowl.
                          Also for reminding me that I have your books on my shelf for inspiration!!
                          This will also be the first time I use the Excalibur to cut the rings instead of fighting...
                          Today, 08:27 AM
                        • NC Scroller
                          Reply to My computer issues.
                          by NC Scroller
                          There is a free software package by GLARY Utilities by glarysoft that our local computer club uses to clean junk off do hard drives and defrag. They recommend running it monthly. You should also check for malware which most antivirus software does not prevent.

                          https://www.glarysoft....
                          Today, 07:57 AM
                        Working...
                        X