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  • Removing burrs

    Hello,
    Do any of you take the time to remove the burr on the side of the blades?
    If you do, what is the proper technique, do you have to file both sides a few times until they are actually remove.
    I am assuming that just running it on one side once only pushes them to the other side without actually removing them.
    Does it also dull the blade by doing this?
    Thanks,
    Ronald

  • #2
    The only time I have removed the burr is when I am doing intricate inlay. and then only the back corners of the blade, not the teeth.I use a diamond sharpener while the saw is running. I think it helps in tight turns.
    DSC_3773.JPG
    Rolf
    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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    • #3
      I have never removed the burrs from the teeth of a blade. Not sure why you would do that as it would dull and reduce the life of the blade.

      Like Rolf, I have rounded the back edge of blades when doing real fine cuts.
      Tony

      My Son-in-law said "Darnit, I cut this board twice, now. And it's still too short."

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      • #4
        What blades are you using? You might consider Pegas MGT blades. Less burrs the way they are manufactured. I (ArtCrafters) sells Pegas blades.
        Denny
        ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

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        • #5
          The reason I am asking is because in one of the books that I have by Patrick Spielman he mentions that the burr edge can be removed and that in some cases it improves the blades performance, Scroll saw Basics by Patrick Spielman.
          Therefore, I assume that many scrollers actually do remove the burrs from regular non precision blades.
          I am not sure if precision blades were available at the time of the publication as they are not mentioned.
          Either that has not caught on or it is old school as I see by your responses that most people may not bother to do this.

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          • #6
            Patrick was trailblazer in the scroll saw world back in the day. I see no reason remove the burr. In fact I use the burr to shave the cut when needed. I have been scrolling for over twenty years, so I know how to control the blade to track straight or curved.
            Dan in So.Ca.

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            • #7
              Dgman,
              what do you mean by shaving the cut when needed
              Ronald

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              • #8
                I think there's some confusion here between softening the edges at the rear of the blade to facilitate cutting curves, which is also done with band saw blades, and using the set of the teeth of the scroll saw blade to shave material to correct minor cutting defects. I don't know of anyone who advocates messing with the teeth themselves.

                As I recall, for most blades (maybe not PGT or others of that type) the set of the teeth is on the right side, which is why it's often easier to follow the line accurately with the right side of the blade against the cut line.

                Carole

                Follow me on my blog: www.scrollsawbowls.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RonD View Post
                  Dgman,
                  what do you mean by shaving the cut when needed
                  Ronald
                  If the cut is not perfect, I use the burr of the blade to shave or take off a little material.
                  Dan in So.Ca.

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