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  • Saw Blade Too Loose

    I am cutting oak, and I understand that is hard wood. But when I push the wood the back of the blade rubs against the red plate. I have the tension set as tight as I can get it. Is there something else I am doing wrong?

  • #2
    What saw are you using?

    Paul S.

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    • #3
      Even though the tension is cranked up all the way, is the blade real tight? With moderate pressure from the front, can you make it give more than 1/8"? When you snap it with your finger, does it have a ping like a high C? Have you tried a different blade?

      Maybe there is a slight bend or bow in the blade before clamping, so when you tension it all the way, it still doesn't get real tight because of the fore mentioned slack.
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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      • #4
        I am using a Craftsman scroll saw. The blade is very tight. I am not able to move the blade if I push on it without the wood. I did not try another blade but, I'm thinking maybe the blade is dull. I haven't used it that long, but I have never had a blade go dull on me, so I don't know how long they should last. I tried increasing the speed and that seemed to help, but I need slower speed when I'm going around the curves. I can't seem to control it well enough yet at full speed.

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=ThCube]I tried increasing the speed and that seemed to help, but I need slower speed when I'm going around the curves. /QUOTE]


          When increasing the speed helps it cut better, it has to be a dull blade. I have a Dewalt with a speed selector of 1 -8. When using a fresh blade I start at around 3 or 4 and as the blade dulls, I gradually increase my speed. How can I tell it's getting dull? I need to force the wood into the blade instead of letting the blade do the work.

          Some scrollers change blades every 20 minutes or so and others claim they wait until the blade starts smoking. It all depends on the wood and type and size blade. I can go 1 1/2 hours when using a size 0 blade in 1/4" BB ply, but haven't cut enough oak yet so I can't tell you my personal experience with that wood. However, follow the guidelines I mentioned and experience will do the rest. Remember, blades are cheap so it's never worth forcing them to do more then they were intended.
          Last edited by Minnesota scroller; 02-12-2007, 07:08 PM.
          Mike

          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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          • #6
            I have found that some blades will dull quicker than others out of the same pack and in the same piece of wood. You should never have the blade pushed against the plate. As everyone has said that does indicate a problem in either tension or dull blade. I have cut alot of 5/8" redoak. As Mike said the blade should do the work. Steve
            If This HillBilly Can't Fix it Then it Ain't Broke!!!
            My Gallery
            [email protected]

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            • #7
              I wish I would have waited a little longer and received your posts. But I plunged forward and I broke my project into many pieces. My lesson learned ... dull blade = force wood ... force wood = vibration ... vibration = broken project. This learning curve is really frustrating. I wish I could find someone who offered a class on scroll sawing. I'm really enjoying the work, but not enjoying having to learn on my own.

              Thank you Mike and Steve, at least I now know what was wrong and I won't make this mistake twice.

              Comment


              • #8
                Where 'ya from ThCube? There may be a local scrolling club in your area with somebody that would be willing to sit down with you. As for the lesson you learned, been there ... done that myself. Even a sharp blade put in the right direction and with the proper tension won't guarantee you success but it sure does increase the odds. Haste is what usually creates the waste in my work shop. LOL Sorry it happened to you but it'll get better with time.

                Andy
                Shoot for the moon. If you miss you'll be headed for a star! www.80artdesigns.com

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                • #9
                  Thanks Andy, I sure hope it does get better in time.

                  I live in North West, Arkansas. If you know of a club or class in this area, I would be forever grateful!! I ejoy this too much to give up, but a class would sure help the learning curve.

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                  • #10
                    ThCube -

                    If you havent seen it already, Rick Hutcheson at http://www.scrollsaws.com/ has a bunch of downloadable video clips illustrating various tips and techniques. If you are having problems that might be a good place to look to see how a real scrollmeister does it. There is a whole load of useful advice on his site as well as plans for projects.

                    Chris
                    "If you march your Winter Journeys you will have your reward, so long as all you want is a penguin's egg."

                    Saws: AWSF18, Meccano Mk II

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                    • #11
                      Chris,

                      Thank you very much for the link. I had not been there before, but I will definately check it out. I really appreciate the help and advice I have received on this site. Everyone here is so wonderful and helpful. I am so glad I found it.

                      Terry

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                      • #12
                        What was the oak thickness, and what size/style blade were you using? It really could be a number of things. for 3/4 thick red oak and a good quality blade, you should be able to get at least 20 minutes of cutting time on a #5 blade with reverse teeth, again, if the reversed teeth are set to only come above table height by two or three teeth, and your feeding it to cut, not rushing it. Tight turns and heat buildup also are factors. You will get the hang of it pretty fast, especially with breaking projects! Dale
                        Dale w/ yella saws

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                        • #13
                          Terry, using a blade with less T.P.I may also help when cutting hard wood such as oak or maple. Just a thought.
                          Mick, - Delta P-20

                          A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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                          • #14
                            It can't be over emphasized let the saw do the work. Don't change motor speed in the turns just slow up the feed a touch and let the blade cut though. I've be scrolling for over 20 yrs and it took awhile to get the feel.
                            Happy scrolling ain't it fun
                            www.scrollsawart.com

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