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  • What size drill bit to use?

    Hello, everyone! I'm new here but also new to scrolling. My daughter got me hooked and now I've got a couple of questions.

    I was looking at some finished work pictures here and saw one with a train that had inside cuts. The cuts were just lines on the piece. No cut out sectioni but just lines. My question is how do you know what size drill bit to use so you can cut those lines without a round hole to show where you started? I'm using Flying Dutchman blades but have no idea what drill bit to use with which blade.

    My other question is where do I find reasonably priced wood to scroll that is 1/8" to 1/2"? I live in New Jersey and there is no where here that sells wood that thin. I've only been able to find warped basswood 1/4" plywood at the craft stores or 3/4" solid planks at the lumber yards.

    Any direction on where to get decent, thin, reasonbly priced wood would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
    Mia

    We are the music makers.
    We are the dreamers of dreams.


    Easy scrollin' with a DW788

  • #2
    I get all my BB ply from http://www.sloanswoodshop.com/, among other things. Any place that sells blades will be able to recommend the right bit size for the blade you will be using.
    Mike

    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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    • #3
      As far as drill bit sizes go, if you look at the blade page on the FD site it gives you the corresponding drill size for each blade. http://www.mikesworkshop.com/blades.htm

      Welcome to the board by the way ...
      Ian

      Scrolling with a Dewalt 788

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      • #4
        Welcome to the site!!!

        I hope you enjoy your visits.

        In response to your wood question-

        1st try on the Internet http://www.woodfinder.com/ and search you local area for REAL lumber yards. It may surprise you. If you find a local lumber yard, call to check when they are open. Many only work M-F banker's hours. It may depend on where in NJ you live. But you get good prices for full sheets of plywood. Hardwood lumber at a real lumber yard may not be fully 4 sided surfaced (ready for use.) Many hardwood users prefer only 3 sided surfaced.

        There is a craft store chain in the USA called Michael's http://www.michaels.com/art/online/home and they sell BB plywood in pre-cut craft sized pieces ( 12 in X 12 in; 12in X 24in; etc). Be aware: take the THICK wallet when you shop there; prices tend to be a bit high.

        Check out Woodcraft supply http://www.woodcraft.com/ for a local store near you in their store locater. Many of their local stores carry hardwoods for hobbyist. Call first to verify what thickness they carry in woods. Another hobby woodworking chain store that could be local to you is Rockler: http://www.rockler.com/

        If none of these suggestions pan out for you in your location, then, as already suggested, try Sloan's.

        Phil

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        • #5
          Thanks so much!!!! I've been browsing the posts here for a week or so and felt shy about posting stupid questions, but since I scoured the past posts and didn't really find my answer, I swallowed my pride and posted. WOW! I'm so glad I did. I appreciate all your input and am on my way to checking out the sites you all provided.
          Mia

          We are the music makers.
          We are the dreamers of dreams.


          Easy scrollin' with a DW788

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by GrayBeard Phil
            1st try on the Internet http://www.woodfinder.com/ and search you local area for REAL lumber yards. It may surprise you.
            Truer words were never spoken. The big retailers seem to have taken over everything, but these guys are still there quietly supplying the trades.

            If you're lucky, you'll find one that will cut your boards to size for you, for a small fee.

            Pete

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            • #7
              As far as what size drill bit to use. I would use a really small blade then the appropriate size drill bit. That way the smaller the hole is, you would not really notice it. Cutting on these lines is known as veining.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by miamw
                Thanks so much!!!! I've been browsing the posts here for a week or so and felt shy about posting stupid questions, but since I scoured the past posts and didn't really find my answer, I swallowed my pride and posted. WOW! I'm so glad I did. I appreciate all your input and am on my way to checking out the sites you all provided.

                Welcome to the forum and no need to feel shy or embarassed about posting questions. People here love to help out and there is no question that shouldn't or can't be asked here. I've been on other forums where newbies get flamed for asking repetitive or basic questions, but not here. This is a great group of folks with a wide variety of skills and experience, so please feel free to ask away!
                Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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                • #9
                  Welcome to our great group. The best place for the best advice.
                  Diane
                  Dragon
                  Owner of a nice 21" Excalibur
                  Owner of a Dewalt 788
                  PuffityDragon on AFSP

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                  • #10
                    QUOTE The cuts were just lines on the piece. No cut out sectioni but just lines. My question is how do you know what size drill bit to use so you can cut those lines without a round hole to show where you started? QUOTE

                    My answer to your question to your question would be that you might be best to use a drillpress, and use a higher speed, with a zero clearence chuck, and very fine bits. The higher speed will make them drill straight, and will help prevent breakage. You may have to use a jabbing motion to drill a stack-pile. Drill your entry holes where lines v or cross to hide the hole. You may also widen the vein slightly where the entry hole is.
                    You may be able to find someone who can resaw hard woods down to the desired thickness. They may be a pleasing option to baltic birch plywood.
                    Good luck and have fun.
                    North wood clocks

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                    • #11
                      After reading the other replies, I don't think your question on how to cut those viening lines was answered. Drilling the gate hole can be done with a brad nail, say 18 gauge. Cut the head off and sharpen the other end to a point. Not much good for stack cutting, though.

                      My smallest drill bit is 1/16" but Sloan's does sell smaller. If you only use the 1/16", you can disguise the hole somewhat. Drill the gate at one end of the veining line. When you make the cut, shape the gate like a tear drop to smooth the transition.
                      Mike

                      Craftsman 16" VS, Puros Indios and Sam Adams!
                      Scrollin' since Jun/2006

                      My Gallery

                      http://scrollcrafters.com (reciprocal links welcomed)

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                      • #12
                        List of places to purchase wood on line.
                        www.heritagewood.com
                        www.ocoochhardwoods.com
                        www.scrolleronline.com
                        www.wildwooddesigns.com
                        www.thinboards.com
                        Mick, - Delta P-20

                        A smile is a small curve that straightens everything out.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MikeDingas
                          Drill the gate at one end of the veining line. When you make the cut, shape the gate like a tear drop to smooth the transition.
                          Where there is no "V" or intersection of lines I have actually drilled starter holes at both ends of the veining line. If done carefully it makes it look like part of the design. I find it effectve where there are only a few veining lines.
                          Scott
                          Creator of fine designer sawdust.

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                          • #14
                            get yourself some teeny drillbits from sloanswoodshop.com or from mikeswolrkshop.com . Another good source for thin hardwoods is www.petersonscustomlumber.com .
                            Dale w/ yella saws

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                            • #15
                              Miamw,

                              1. There are a few sites where you can get the drill size information.
                              But a good start is The Scrollsaw association of the world. Look for blade sources. http://www.saw-online.com/Resources/blades.htm
                              Olson , FD, Pegas have blade charts with the appropriate drill size for each blade.
                              2. A good source for small drills (# drills)is Sloans (http://www.sloanswoodshop.com/drill_bits.htm)

                              3. Here is the biggy. If you are using flat blades, and I dont care what size, you will always have a round hole at the end of the line. So all you can do is disguise it by tapering the line at the end to accomodate the hole. You are after all putting a rectangle in a round hole. The only time you won't see that is if you use a spiral blade.
                              Rolf
                              RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                              Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                              Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                              And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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