Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Raw beginner questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • miamw
    replied
    I found this great drill bit size chart and wanted to share it with you.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_and_tap_size_chart

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzz
    replied
    Chart

    Thanks W. Y. Just didn't see the blade size on the far right. Was looking for a different type of chart. This one is excellent!

    Leave a comment:


  • William Young (SE BC)
    replied
    hmmmm . . that's strange. When I click on it the chart comes up immediately even on dial up service. It says blade chart in red letters just above where it shows the size of drill bit to use all down the right side for the various sizes of blades.
    W.Y.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzz
    replied
    Drill Bit Chart

    WY. I went to the site you mentioned to check out the chart for drill bit/blade sizes, but did not see it. Exactly where is it? Sometimes I have a problem with my present browser so while I'm waiting for your reply, I'll try a different one.
    Thanks
    Buzz

    Leave a comment:


  • William Young (SE BC)
    replied
    Hi Steve;
    Congratulations on your new saw. Hope you get many years of great sawing enjoyment with it.
    You previously asked
    When drilling a hole for interior cuts, why use holes that match the blade size? If the area to be cut out is large (let's say 1/4 to 1/2"), why not use a 1/16 or 1/8 bit? I see charts that give the various bit sizes to match blade sizes.
    Here is a good chart that shows what size drill bit should be used for different size blades.

    http://bensscrollsaw.com/blade.html

    Hope that helps with your inquiry.
    W.Y.

    Leave a comment:


  • sstalker
    replied
    Sharon,

    I should be receiving about 13 back issues in the mail (hopefully tomorrow). I only have the current is (Chistmas) of SSW. I would like to get a subscription but don't want to get another current issue I already have. Guess I will have to call them.

    Thanks for the reply.

    Steve - Toledo

    Leave a comment:


  • SharonW0111
    replied
    If you can get your hands on a couple of issues back our mag had a cute project that incorperated pryograpy with scrolling.
    It does add to a piece sometimes I have use it myself on some of my first projects.

    Leave a comment:


  • SharonW0111
    replied
    Hi Steve-- as far as break outs and bits goes I use only a 1/16" they are cheap and last a very long time and fit my Dremel flex shaft and my drill press both. I will advise to use a good piece of scrap board under your project and go all the way through with your bit- this prevents tear outs I use a 2x4 on my press and usually just a old scrap of plywood on my work table for when I use my Dremel ( which I do use most of the time). when the ply gets to many holes to do me much good I chunk it in the burning box and use something else I do like to use a large board on my work table to give stability --
    Sharon

    Leave a comment:


  • sstalker
    replied
    Well, my Hawk finally arrived. My first ever project is a Xmas ornament about 4 inches in diameter. I still have a long way to go, but my 5 y.o. granddaughter loves it.

    The Hawk is a far cry from my 10 y.o. Delta that I used for cutting small trim. The whole house knew when I turned that machine on. The Hawk just purrs.

    Now to figure out how to combine pyrography with scroll work.

    This board has been a blessing for learning "how to".

    Steve - Toledo
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Steve, the purpose of matching drill bit sizes to blade size is for those cases where you may be doing veining or have some very thin lines where a larger drill bit will be much larger than the actual width of the cut you wish to make. If you are doing veining and you use a bit that is twice the width of the vein, it will be very noticeable. You don't want people to see the actual entry hole. When I am using a #0 blade, I will first use a larger bit where I have plenty of cutout space, and after those holes are drilled, I will switch to the smaller bit where the lines are extremely thin. When I started scrolling, I would drill all the holes with the smaller that coincided with my blade. I soon learned that was silly. Now I'll use 2 different size bits per project.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gill
    replied
    Hi Steve

    So long as you don't get 'breakout' from the drill bit on the underside which will impact on the areas that you wish to retain, there's no reason why you shouldn't use a large drill bit. The name of the game is getting rid of the material you don't want and leaving the material you need. Nobody's going to ask questions once your project's been finished, so do whatever works for you. I regularly cut lots of large access holes, not only on fretwork but also on compound pieces. It makes projects a lot easier.

    Gill

    Leave a comment:


  • sstalker
    replied
    Another newbie question:

    When drilling a hole for interior cuts, why use holes that match the blade size? If the area to be cut out is large (let's say 1/4 to 1/2"), why not use a 1/16 or 1/8 bit? I see charts that give the various bit sizes to match blade sizes.

    Again, thanks in advance for help with my questions.

    Steve - Toledo

    Leave a comment:


  • sstalker
    replied
    Thanks to all for your replies. I finally ordered an RBI VS220. I don't know that I have ever bought a 'better' tool and regretted spending the money. I also got a good supply of FD SR blades from Mike. Seven dozen are in the #3 & #5 sizes. I also go a few #1, 7 & 9. By the time I go through them, I will have a pretty good feel for where to go from there.

    Saw ships next Monday. Primary interest is fretwork. Will post when I get something worth posting.

    Steve - Toledo

    Leave a comment:


  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Regarding saws, you'll find happy sawyers with the Dewalt and happy sawyers with the Delta. I recently purchased a used Dewalt off Ebay and can't say anything bad about it. However, I do need to caution you about one thing if you decide to go with the Dewalt. The newer ones, which are labeled type 2, are made in China. Some people are having great luck with them and others have to send them to a service center as soon as they receive them. Some have major flaws. The older ones like mine, the type 1, work great out of the box. These were made in Canada. Daryl has a refurbished one coming from Amazon.com. He shouldn't have much to worry about with this one, considering it's been reconditioned.

    What sold me on the Dewalt vs. the Delta was the variable speed. I like to change speeds quite often and I think having to stop the saw everytime you want to change the speed, would be a pia. Also, I prefer tools made on this continent.

    Just my 3c worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • beemerbob
    replied
    Originally posted by sstalker
    Hi all,

    Great web site.

    I am pretty new to the scroll side of the wood business. Trying right now to decide between a Delta P-20, Dewalt 788 and the EX-21. Not a huge difference in price.

    Steve - Toledo, OH
    Steve, take a look at what these folks said about the Delta P20.

    http://www.scrollsaws.com/SawReviews/P20.html

    Leave a comment:

Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Working...
X