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  • New cutter-rough cuts

    I finally have the chance to use that DW788 that's been gathering dust for two years, and learning that it's much more than I thought, even learning the basics. I've started with some simple puzzle patterns which have some tight "V" cuts, which needless to say will need to be smoothed out.
    Two questions: I am using Olson 627 #7 and Olson 620 Univ. #2/0; Olson #455 12. Would a spiral cut be the right one to use with these "V" cuts?
    These small rounded cuts are not easy to sand with an oscillating hand sander or a belt sander...is there a better way?

  • #2
    Rick H has all kinds of information on his website, including what blades to use for what, how to make certain kinds of cuts, etc. He has some videos, too!

    http://www.scrollsaws.com/

    As for sanding in tight places, I have used a narrow strip of sandpaper as you would use dental floss on your teeth.

    Welcome aboard and good luck!

    Pete

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    • #3
      Hi Victoria. Welcome aboard. Read the thread "making turns" under the "Begginner"s Scroll Saw" heading. These replys should help you out.

      Also, spirals aren't capable of making a sharp V.
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

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      • #4
        Its about time!!!! Get that saw out and use it! Welcome to the addiction!
        Your material you cut will determine your blade. For a tight V in something like a stack of BBply (Baltic birch plywood), hardwood, or a mixture can be cut with any of the blades you mentioned, depending on thickness and density of what is being cut. When I cut a tight V in anything thivker then 3/8th inch, I always try to tackle that from both angles just to get that sharp, crisp corner or point. Lets say you are cutting a stack of three layers of hardwood, 1/4th inch thick. The 2/0 blade , although you can make a nice tight turn, would be to small of a blade, and would heat up pretty fast, and not cooperate when you tried that tight V.For a 3/8th inch high cut, it would be excellant. Lets say youve got in your #7, and tackling that 3/4th inch high stack of wood (that blade should be fine ). Set big yella (your saw) at about 6 1/2 to 7 for speed.Cut into the V first like this \ , then back out and cut through your waste area until you can cut straight in like this / to complete the V . If your saw table is set precisely at 90 degrees to the blade, you will have a real nice crisp point in the bottom of that V . Now, if you are needing the piece on the inside of that V as your keeper, and the outside of that is waste, first cut this leg \ starting from the top. Continue past the end of that point a little, then make a turn, removing a little circle or teardrop shaped piece)of wood as you meet up with your line again, lined up for / side of that cut. That will give you a nice crisp point.Do a series of these on a practice piece if you are still confused, after a couple you will get the hang of it.
        You can do the turn right in the corner too, just take your time, and as you turn the wood remember the teeth will want to cut whatever they come in contact with, so try to keep your work against the backside of the blade as you pivot the wood. One more note,do your wood turning with the saw running always, or else you will ruin your blade, and say bad words.
        I hope this helped you a little. If you get a chance, let us know what you are cutting (thickness, species, ect) . Dale
        Dale w/ yella saws

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        • #5
          Peteb- what a wonderful site! I may find what I need. Thank you so much!

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          • #6
            lucky788scroller

            Lucky788scroller: thank you so much! I've printed the reply and can't wait for my new blades per your advice. I live in a remote region of alaska(no road acess, only boat or plane) and my wood for practice is straight grain hemlock I got from a friend who owns the sawmill, and cuts his own trees. I use his scrap wood from resaws which is 5/8" and clear.

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome to the forum Victoria.
              It sounds like you have a wonderful source of wood there.
              I think, since you are in such a remote location we can expect mountains of scrolling projects from you

              We have at least two other scrollers living in your neck of the woods.
              You will find this forum one big happy family.
              Sure we have a few "crazy relatives" but thats what makes it fun.

              Enjoy your new hobby and all of your new friends.
              Carl
              CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
              "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
              Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

              Comment


              • #8
                Welcome aboard! Hmmmm hemlock..... sounds like a wood for Bob to do a wood profile on in a future article.From the little research I have done, it looks like a very good scrolling wood! At 5/8th thick, a #5 blade should be a great blade. Keep us posted on how your coming along! Dale
                Dale w/ yella saws

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                • #9
                  If you have spiral blades and you live in wisconsin, then you should put wax paper on your saw table before slicing your cheese.
                  Jeff Powell

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CanadianScroller
                    Sure we have a few "crazy relatives" but thats what makes it fun.

                    Hey, I resemble that remark.
                    Kelly
                    "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." Walt Disney

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by workin for wood
                      If you have spiral blades and you live in wisconsin, then you should put wax paper on your saw table before slicing your cheese.

                      Do I need the waxed paper for slicing summer sausage too? Gotta have something to go with the cheese.
                      Kelly
                      "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." Walt Disney

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