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  • All kinds of questions on mini clock inserts

    We have been thinking of ways to use these mini clock inserts and number one I havn'e gotten directions and was told that they were so simple i didn't need any. At my ago you need directions to the bathorom lol. So anyways what we did find was they needed a mounting hole of 1 3/8 and 5/16ths deep.
    1. question..Do we drill the hole just to the 5/16ths or do we will it all they way thru the material? Do we take apart the insert to install it?
    2. After thinking about this direction of the insert needs 5/16 to install why have we seen the mini clock used in an oval or circle picture with just a ring around the mini clock?
    #. So last question. What if the material we are working with is way over the 5/16? In our case a bigger insert wouldn"t work out cuz it would be too large for our pattern idea. so can we put it in anyways or do we have to cut it down all the way or just a certain part of the wood?
    So far I think I'm going to enjoy doing these. It will b the first hobby ive had that doesnt stress me out. I like doing it even if I'm not doing real well at it all the time. I get to come up with fun ideas for stuff.
    Thanks in advance for any and all answers and ideas!
    karen

  • #2
    Hi Karen,

    Not sure I can answer all your questions, but in general, mini clocks are simply a friction fit. These are often called "fit-ups". The hole can be either a through hole or a stopped hole. It really doesn't matter because to change batteries or time setting, you can remove the clock from the front and simply press it back in to re-install. The thickness of the wood itself is not a factor, as long as it's thick enough to house the insert (at least as thick as the recommended hole depth). Thicker wood is fine. Also, you don't need to take the clock insert apart to install it. Just push it into the hole. It will stop when the back of the bezel contacts the surface of the wood, so there is no danger of pushing it too deep into the hole.

    Different clocks of the same overall size may take slightly different size holes, depending on the way the clock is manufactured. Some use spring tabs to hold the clock in place and some use an o-ring. There may be others, but this is what I'm familiar with. Either way, the manufucturer should provide the proper hole size in the clock's information. As long as you drill the hole to this diameter, it should fit fine.

    Hope this helps.
    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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    • #3
      I buy all of my clock inserts from Woodworking Tools and Supplies for Woodworking, Projects & Hobbys

      They have a blog post and a short video that may help you with sizing.

      Comment


      • #4
        G'day Karen, you have just about all the info you need.
        Just to add a little, I'd recommend getting forstner bits at the correct sizes for the holes.
        The pictures of clocks that are oval, square etc still need a round hole to fit them.
        Regards
        John
        "The Golden Mile"John Wayne
        Some of my Stuff
        Retired Medically Unfit Police Officers ***.

        Comment


        • #5
          My first real project was a Wolf face that I liked. I had only cut key chains before so I ordered the clocks and I cut the hole with the saw and had a fear of cutting it to big so I had to do a lot of sanding to make the clock fit. The second one I built (An Eagle) I drilled it with a bit and it is a lot easier and faster and I only went part of the way through the half inch material.
          I think they make a simple picture something that has a purpose. I've made several for friends and given them as presents.

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          • #6
            I have used several on projects so far, very easy to do. Like was said, just make the hole the size they recommend. On one of my projects I also installed one of those pendulum kits. They utilize the same hole only the pendulum goes in from the back side. The wood just needs to be thick enough so they both can be inserted in the hole (the pendulum does not go completely in the hole however since it needs to hang out the back for the swinging thingy).
            Ron

            My sawdust gallery

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            • #7
              Karen, I agree that you should get a Forstner bit to drill the holes for the clock, since they make a flat bottomed hole. The only drawback is that they have a point for centering and starting the bit that adds about 1/8" to the depth beyond the flat bottom of the hole. so the 5/16" really needs about 7/16" of wood if you don't want the point to come through the back of the piece.
              My druthers is to drill a through hole if the wood is less than 1/2" thick and a stopped hole if it is thicker than that.

              george
              A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
              George

              delta 650, hawk G426

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              • #8
                Well I got the forstner bit. now if I may be so silly to ask if i have a 1/4 inch board and I'm going to drill the hole am I drillingstraight down on the part of the board that is going to be the face of the clock? The other problem I have is i had to buy a drill press and we really didntthink much of it. it was a bench size one but its slowest speed on the drill press is 80 to 100 rpm less than that the forsner bit recommends for speed. is that ok? I'm trying to make some odd mini clocks that r different from the norm and I will b adding some pieces of wood glued together making them look kind of like rocks. after the glue is dry can I drill the hole thru that to insert the clock. Do I need some sort of vice to hold it together and still while drilling? Another thing do I just shove the clock in face down into the hole or is that the part the back goes in. lol I need a book on this Im afraid lol I still don't get the extra 1/8 of an inch. Do I need to take the insert clock apart or does it go in as is? maybe if you guys have pictures Id do better. ughhh <G>

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                • #9
                  Hi Karen,

                  Let me see if I understand your questions.

                  Typically you will drill the hole into the good side/face of the board. The clock insert then just fits into the hole, with the face of the clock out. The back of the clock will be going into the hole. There is no need to take the clock insert apart. It is simply a friction fit. The diameter of the back of the clock that goers into the hole is smaller than the clock face itself. This allows the bezel of the clock to fit tight against the surface of the wood and the hole will be invisible from the front of the clock.

                  The drill press speeds should be fine. The biggest thing with Forstner style bits is that you don't want to run them too fast. If the speed is 80-100RPM less than recommended, this shouldn't present any problems. It will just take a little longer to make the hole.

                  It's always a good idea to have some way of holding the piece securely to the drill press table when drilling with Forstner style bits. They can have a tendency to grab and may twist the piece out of your hand. This is especially true with larger bits, say over 1" diameter.

                  I'm not sure I completely understand what you are doing;

                  I will b adding some pieces of wood glued together making them look kind of like rocks. after the glue is dry can I drill the hole thru that to insert the clock.

                  However, even if the wood is uneven, you can still drill with a Forstner bit. That is the beauty of these bits compared to standard drills, they are a lot more versatile drilling on edges, angles and uneven surfaces. That said, I think it's even more important to have some way of holding the piece securely under these conditions, just to be safe and avoid damaging your project.

                  I hope this helps.
                  Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello karen, just to build on what people have said above here are some photos.

                    Pictures of small Clock insert with a nylon collar on the back.
                    Hole needs to be diameter of the collar for a snug press fit.
                    Can be pushed into and pulled out.

                    Also a picture of how they can be inserted ie. either drilled to depth of back of clock or striaght through.

                    main thing is snug fit. Measure the insert(able) back diameter for hole size.
                    The example I have shown has a nylon collar on back that has small risged that grip the wood, others have spring like clips, they do vary.

                    Always do a test hole in scrap and test fit. Should pop in and back out without too much trouble. Hope visualising with photos helps.

                    Hole in face of project, clock fits that hole, Bevel, (Orange bit) sits on face, Collar (White bit) sits in face. On an uneven surface you will have difficulty sitting the bevel on face. You may have to drill hole to small depthe the diameter of whole clock, then a further hole for insert. Will knock up a picture to shopw what I mean in a min or so and edit in.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Sunlion; 12-28-2011, 04:24 AM.
                    The Journey Is Everything.

                    http://www.sunlion-pyrography.co.uk/

                    My Google+

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                    • #11
                      Thank guys. I guess I will just jump in and see what happens. ive ordered some clock inserts and I'm already thinking of how to finish the projects and inbetween company here off and on I'll try to get something done. Family is nice but sometimes I just wanna mess around with my new stuff if ya know what I mean. The wood that will kind of look like rocks that i'm gluing together is going to b like an underground scenery in a lake. Hubby is painting me a blue gill that will be by the rocks.. all of it on a stand. the clock will b in the rocks with the blue gill looking towards it if it works out. no dont u all steal my idea hahahaha
                      Last edited by karen12; 12-28-2011, 04:47 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Okay cannot edit in a new photo so here is what I would do on uneven surface, others may have other solutions.

                        I would work out where I want the insert, then drill a pilot hole to position and as a guide for my Forsner. Drill to required depth (wont matter if too deep just take care IF you dont want it coming out the back).

                        After pilot hole, Drill larger diameter, ie whole diameter that the clock (0range) will sit in to clear the iregular surface. Then drill smaller diameter of back of watch (White) which is the part that will grip the sides of the hole. Hope that makes sense?

                        Red arrow in pic is pilot hole drilled to depth.

                        again, test this technique on some waste first to ensure snug fit.


                        P.S. Make pilot with a very thin bit, it is there for referenceing the centre for the forsner bits small spike to sit, ensuring it is central to the larger hole as well as a guide for that larger one on initial drilling if you get me.
                        Attached Files
                        Last edited by Sunlion; 12-28-2011, 07:29 AM. Reason: additional advice
                        The Journey Is Everything.

                        http://www.sunlion-pyrography.co.uk/

                        My Google+

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by karen12 View Post
                          Thank guys. I guess I will just jump in and see what happens. ive ordered some clock inserts and I'm already thinking of how to finish the projects and inbetween company here off and on I'll try to get something done. Family is nice but sometimes I just wanna mess around with my new stuff if ya know what I mean. The wood that will kind of look like rocks that i'm gluing together is going to b like an underground scenery in a lake. Hubby is painting me a blue gill that will be by the rocks.. all of it on a stand. the clock will b in the rocks with the blue gill looking towards it if it works out. no dont u all steal my idea hahahaha
                          Your idea on the rocks is something I had thought of doing before, too.
                          I wanted to make birdhouses and actually put rocks on the side for a rock foundation look.
                          You can get a cement like material to put the rocks on with and inbetween them....
                          to make them stick together and to the project.

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