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Securing Patterns

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  • Securing Patterns

    After reading some of the advice in other threads I used clear packaging tape and spray adhesive on some practice puzzles. First appled was a coat of tape, then a light application of spray adhesive. I let it sit till it was tacky and then fastened the pattern followed by another coat of tape. Then I removed the excessive bulk stock with my band saw and there was a noticable increase in cutting efficiency. When I cut out the puzzle on my Dewalt, the best way of saying it, is that it cut like a hot knife through butter. There are some great tips on this forum! Thanks, Flintlockjoe.

  • #2
    I've been back & forth on the whole tape thing. I started using it several years ago, based on recommendations from this forum and the guys in my club. Then, for no real good reason, I kind of drifted away from using it as much. For what I was cutting, I didn't think I noticed much of a difference.

    Then, just recently I was cutting some cherry (very prone to burning). I had a new 2/0 blade in and noticed some scorching right away. Hmmmm, I says to myself, mebbe it's time to prove to myself, once & for all, if this tape thing is real, or just myth. On my next piece, I applied some clear packing tape and using the same blade, the difference was immediately noticeable and dramatic. Not only did I not burn the cherry, the blade cut better, faster and longer. I don't have any idea why I was a skeptic. I've been doing this long enough to know better, but I have proven it to myself, beyond all doubt now, that it works. Even us old(er) dogs can re-learn new tricks.
    Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

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    • #3
      I think a lot depends on what type of wood you're cutting and how thick. Anything under 1/4" I usually don't use tape. If you think Cherry is bad, ever try bloodwood? I thought I had a fire under my saw, lol.

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      • #4
        I normally use blue tape and glue the pattern to it. The other day I put 4 layers of 1/8" together and taped them with clear tape, then glued the pattern on top of that (Elmers) and to my supprise a few days later I picked them up and the pattern and glue all slid off. Now I now I needed to put another layer of tape over the pattern. That's why I check this forum real regular. Thanks everyone, you have really been a big help.

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        • #5
          Following up on Bill's story, I was cutting 1" maple and tried a number of different blades from a number of different makers and all burned the wood. Since it was a bowl pattern it did not matter. Put clear tape on the next one and eliminated the burning, did not matter which blade I used.

          To build a stack I use a combination of 3-M Blue Delicate tape and toothpicks glued in the waste area. The pattern seems to stick to the blue tape better than the clear using 3M 77.
          You mileage may vary, but it works for me.
          Terry
          Got Moose?

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          • #6
            When cutting thick wood I put the pattern on then put clear packing on top of it.
            I'm to cheap to use blue tape, but it works for me.

            Bob
            Delta P-20 & Q-3

            I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

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            • #7
              I'm new to scrolling but do a lot of display case type work, so Acrylic is one material I was interested in scrolling with. I fell into a rabbit hole yesterday watching short tip videos on Rick's website, and man what a great way to spend a few hours. It was also a bit depressing to see the effortless speed with which he works, but I attribute that to some kind of savant-like mental illness. The man owns something like 130 scroll saws! He needs help.
              Just kiddin', his video's probably accelerated my learning by at least a light year. He's my new Yoda, since it's pretty evident that the force is strong in that one. (I actually think he can cut with his eyes closed)

              Anyway, he did a demo of cutting with and without the packing tape, as well as using a thin line of mineral oil to lubricate the acrylic cuts, and boy what a difference. Seems to make perfect sense though. When they make the tape they have to apply something to the top of the roll or it would all remain hopelessly stuck to itself. If it is in fact some sort of silicone product, I wonder if a light spray of silicone right over a paper pattern would accomplish the same thing? Me thinks I'll give it a try...
              Ron Paul

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              • #8
                Galt,
                one thing you will find is that the majority of us use Johnson paste wax without silicone (to smooth our scrolling tables) because silicon can stain your work piece...So I would not think spraying silicone onto your workpiece via the pattern would be a good idea. let us know how it goes though...
                "Still Montana Mike"

                "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
                Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

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                • #9
                  Understand that, but what do ya think the chemical/substance is that is all over the tape that works so well - if not silicone. That was just a guess...maybe some kind of wax as well? I'll still give the spray a try, but I'm just guessing at what's on the tape.
                  Ron Paul

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