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  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    If your wood is warped, or cupped, it is easy to make it jump with the blade as your hands put pressure on the wood differently as you move your hands. The key to it simply is practice.And, if you are more comfortable with the hold-down in place, keep it there. After you gain more experience you may find it getting in your way, and at that time you can remove it. Good luck to you, I can already see your addicted! Dale

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  • DBONNER
    replied
    Dbonner

    Yes, the teeth are down. In fact I've been cutting other projects without any problem. I'm guessing it's the operator. Ha... I have cut out several small things just practicing, and have been going very slowly. I think it's just something I'm doing or not doing. Thanks for your help.
    Diane

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  • Minnesota scroller
    replied
    Welcome to the group DAB. The most common reason for this is if the blade is in upside down. If it's a skip tooth blade, make sure the teeth are facing down and if it's a reverse tooth blade, the majority of the teeth should be pointing down with just a few pointing up. If this isn't the problem, let us know.

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  • DBONNER
    replied
    Dbonner

    Maybe I'm still a little bit nervous about getting my fingers too close. The thing is, I've done several small projects and didn't have all that bouncing around, but yesterday it seemed to be worse. I'll check the tension and see if that's my problem. I'm still very new at this and can't wait to get off work so I can go home and practice more. Thanks for the help.
    Diane

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  • Rolf
    replied
    I am sure that you checked this, but make sure your blade is not in upside down.( easier to do than you realize) Also when making your turns let the blade do its job otherwise it will bind and also make your project hop.

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  • Mick Walker
    replied
    Diane, welcome. Most scrollers remove the hold down, it just gets in your way. Place your fingers closer to the blade to hold the wood from bouncing up and down. I am right handed and place my left index finger close to the blade and use it as a pivot point. I push and steer the wood with my right hand, if you are more comfortable with the hold down in place keep using it. Have been scrolling for over 14 years and have never cut my fingers. Maybe your are not putting enough tension on the blade. With the tension applied pluck the back of the blade like a guitar string. You should get a nice "ping" sound. Too much tension is better than not enough. Have fun with your saw.

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  • DBONNER
    replied
    Dbonner

    Thanks Pete for your help. I'm not giving up. I really want to learn to make yard art most of all. I love all the holiday yard art. Thanks again.
    Diane

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  • PeteB
    replied
    Originally posted by DBONNER
    Hi, I'm another newbie. I have had my scroll saw for a couple of weeks now, and think I'm going to love it. The only problem I'm having is the aggravating bouncing up and down of my project. What am I doing wrong? I have the locking/ hold down part on it that helps some. What do I need to do.
    I had that happen a few times when I started, but not too much, just inattention to keeping some pressure on the piece. It shouldn't take a death grip, though. But then again, I've never used reverse blades so can't speak for them.

    Maybe try a finer blade?

    Pete

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  • DBONNER
    replied
    Dab

    Hi, I'm another newbie. I have had my scroll saw for a couple of weeks now, and think I'm going to love it. The only problem I'm having is the aggravating bouncing up and down of my project. What am I doing wrong? I have the locking/ hold down part on it that helps some. What do I need to do.

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  • Bill Wilson
    replied
    Ceeya,

    You can sometimes avoid weak spots in a pattern by orienting the grain of the wood so as not to create too many fragile cross grain areas. Admittedly, this is easier said than done as many patterns don't lend themselves easily to this strategy, but it is worth noting.

    Also, the type of wood you use makes a difference. Soft woods like pine will snap off much easier than dense hard woods. For very thin, fragile patterns, you can use baltic birch plywood. If you are using solid wood, generally the thicker the material, the less brittle it is.

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  • sheltiecarver
    replied
    Ceeya,
    If you are trying to do fret cutting on very thin stock - like 1/4" or so, you could gain some stability by stack-cutting - that is, stacking 2 or 3 layers together and cutting through all of them at one time. That way, they sort of support one another.
    If you're already using thicker stuff - like wood that is called one-by anything, then you're cutting 3/4", and that is enough for now.
    And remember, slow really means that you see turtles and snails galloping past.
    Welcome to the family.
    I hope we can continue to be helpful to you.
    Sandy
    PS Try to get hold of the book Scrollsaw Workbook by John Nelson. It will answer lots of your questions too.

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  • ceeya
    replied
    thanks again for the fast reply......my saw has variable speed and i will take a look at which blade i have on now and make the necessary changes. you learn by your mistakes and this forum.

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  • Mick Walker
    replied
    ceeya, welcome to the group. I find that using a blade with more t.p.i. works well for me when I am cutting very fine and intricate pieces. I usually use a 2/0, 28 t.p.i. blade on the very fine work and slow the speed down if you have that feature on your saw.
    Mick Delta P-20

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  • Charlie_1
    replied
    Welcome to the Group ceeya

    These guys and gals are always helpful , so ask away if ya need anything

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  • lucky788scroller
    replied
    Your blade life will depend on many things, including the density of the wood, the speed, the style of the blade, and even the pattern you are cutting, believe it or not. Its a matter of experience really,but if you see smoke, ummm, its blade changing time. As soon as your blade seems to want to wander from the line, or twists rather then follows a turn, or you notice you are pushing with quite a bit of force, change the blade. I think we are all guilty of stretching a blade beyond its limits, and we still do, always hoping for one more hole to cut, or that last inch! Try cutting something, cut for ten minutes, then stop and change blades. If you notice a huge diffrence, then you done good, if you dont see no diffrence, try again after 15 min. eventually it will all be done just by experience. Welcome to the addicting world of scrolling! Dale

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