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My first three projects!

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  • My first three projects!

    Now lets see if I can get the photos to post....

    First is a welcome sign, broke part of the first E when the blade grabbed the waste wood.

    Second is my first stack cut. Didn't read that BB plywood doesn't look good stained until after I stained two of the three.

    Last is the first puzzle, made for my daughter, who is 2. She's much better at taking it apart then putting it together. Unfinished currently, any suggestions? It is 1" poplar.

    Comments, suggestions, etc gladly welcomed, it is how I'll learn and improve!

    Cheers,
    Draken

    By the way, I have no idea what blades I used on these, just grabbed what I felt was the best of the 12 blades included with the saw. Still need to purchase some new ones....
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Nice start

    Hi Draken,

    Thanks for sharing those with us.

    For the Welcome sign: When you break a little piece like that you can, more often than not, repair it with some CA glue (Cyano Acrylate) (If you saw the thread where I posted my Oakoo mask, it was broken in 3 pieces, and I was able to fix it with CA, and I defy anyone to find where it was broken)

    CA is a better quality of Crazy glue, usually qualified as "industrial strength" and normally made with purer water than it's commercial counterpart. It makes for a stronger, better bond, and is available in different thicknesses giving you different setting times. You can also get an "accelerator" that will make it bond instantly, if you can't hold it for the required initial period. BUT I have found that the accelerator leaves a whitish residue when it dries.

    Make sure you keep that sign, it will show you where you started, and you will be amazed at the progress you make in a very short while.

    BB can be stained, and I rather like what you did with yours. Of course a picture doesn't show the real thing, but they seem OK. I do have to admit that you would have had better success with Poplar for staining pieces. (And it's availability depending on your geographic location)
    But remember that experimenting is part of the game (just don't do it on a cut of one of jediscroller's or Jeff Zanfino's patterns, or a fret clock. )

    The whale is cute, and I'm sure your daughter is enjoying having you & mom put it back together, He he.

    As for the finish, ALL finishes are childproof (non-toxic) once they have cured.

    The keyword here is "cured". Read the labels, some finishes require months to cure, others just a week.

    I hope this can be of some help to you.

    Welcome to our insanity, I hope you enjoy yourself.

    Regards,
    Marcel
    http://marleb.com
    DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

    NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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    • #3
      Marcel,

      I actually have CA in the shop, only problem is I was using the vacuum (household, not shopvac) hooked up to the dust port and it sucked that little nib right on up. Wasn't about to tear open the dust bag and go looking for it, so I considered it a lesson learned and held down the waste on all the other pieces when I got close to setting them free.

      For puzzles, when finishing them, do you all finish the whole piece or just the top and bottom surfaces? I wouldn't want the finish to interfere with the fitting of the pieces.

      The stain on the BB dragonflies looks a bot splotchy, which is something I read about after the fact (some call it looking muddy). It isn't as noticable in the photos, but is, at least to me, in person. I would have prefered a more even coverage. I've lacquered one of them, thinking of using poly on the other to see how they compare on items like this.

      Thanks!
      Draken
      Last edited by draken; 07-14-2006, 02:46 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Draken. I like all 3 projects. I have to say , I would have torn the bag apart looking for that little piece , have done it but then that was on a very lardg project. and wasn't going to settale for the loss. I think the dragon flys look good too. but then i like the rustic look. I am always surprised when i go away from a project for a while, thinking i bluw it. and come back to see just how cool it really does look. I even think i made so many mistakes that I will never show this to anyone. but so glad to let up on my self, and take the chance . most folks that don't scroll, wonder how in the world did you do that. and how did you get that, uneak finish. LOL. WY will kill me for saying this , but enouph cotes of laquor will fix anything and the puzzale is so cute. on my little ked puzzales. i stain them or color wash them. and then oil them. but then i am not a expert. your doing great kiddo. keep up the good work.
        Evie

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        • #5
          I read somewhere that before staining BB ply you should apply a stain conditioner first, whatever that is. I understand that will eliminate the blotchiness. Also, it's recommended the BB be sanded extremely smooth.
          Let me know if this helps.

          Mike
          Mike

          Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
          www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

          Comment


          • #6
            Draken,
            I've gotta agree with the others that your dragonflies look really good from here! But I like a rustic look, too.
            I really like the whale puzzle, and it sounds like your daughter is getting you trained to put it together. I usually sand that sort of puzzle really well, stain it if I want (or dye it - I'm going to try staining with Koolade soon), - do that by dunking it - either in a zip lock baggie or a shallow foil pan - then I dunk it in Watco (Danish oil) and let it dry. The trouble with that is - it can take 30 days to cure - and for a two-year-old you will certainly see it in the mouth, so it's gotta be cured. By that time, she'd have to train you all over again!
            So... for this one, you may just want to leave it natural - although it'll get pretty dirty.
            If you're using something thin, whether you dip or brush or spray, you can usually get by coating all the surfaces. If it is thicker, or a gloss, you will most likely put it only on the front. And if you use something thinned with water, like really thin acrylics, or watercolor or (water soluble) dye or the Koolade, you will probably raise the grain and have to sand again. Those smooth pieces are attractive to all ages, it seems.
            Good luck on your next projects - it looks like you're getting the hang of it!
            Sandy

            Comment


            • #7
              they all look good , but i like the whale the best.

              i have a twin brother that sucked up a piece into a vacumm also, HE ended up dumping it outside on ground to get it back.......
              Pete Ripaldi

              ---------------------------------
              "Insert Clever Tag Line Here..."

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