Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Forming the wood via a sander

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Forming the wood via a sander

    I bought a drill press and put the sanding devise on this and found my neck getting so sore trying to look sideways at my wood. I went on line and in the hardware section of intarsia.com and found a Foredom Variable Speed Bench Lathe for $189.00. I can afford this at this time however does anyone else use something like this. I would prefer looking down on my object then sideways like a drill press.

  • #2
    KLD,
    I'm not quite sure what you want to do with your sander, but I bought a super cheap 3/8" drill at Harbor Freight, made a little "L" of scrap wood and attached it (drill) via a stainless steel hose clamp. It can be secured to a table/bench with a clamp. I just chuck a sanding drum into it and shape away.
    You should be aware that drill motors and drill presses are not really the best for taking sideways pressure, so eventually the bearings will get loose or fail, but for about $10 (US), I can get another and start all over again. A battery powered one would be really nifty for some times, but I haven't rigged up a gizmo to keep the trigger pulled. You can lock the plug-in ones ON.
    Hope this helps.
    (On the other hand, if you really want the lathe, it would work too. Foredom is an old trusted name, and you could get into turning too. It is also a lot of fun.)
    Good Luck,
    Sandy

    Comment


    • #3
      I have run a sanding drum on my wood lather. Its a fullsize lathe, but size doesnt matter for sanding. I even once used a large dowel (1 1/2 inch range) with a bandsawn slot in it to hold sandpaper wrapped around it to make a makeshift sanding drum before I bought a soft sanding dealie from seyco. Just run the lathe slow, it works great. dale

      edit .... One other way you can try is buying a motor on ebay. You can get some motors dirt cheap if your lucky or patient that you can rig up to hold a sanding drum on. That way, you can mount it to a board, and stash it when your LOYL comes loking around to see what you spent money on this time.
      Last edited by lucky788scroller; 04-04-2006, 09:04 PM.
      Dale w/ yella saws

      Comment


      • #4
        KLD2246,

        unless you need a lathe you could get by with lot less expence bt getting a 1/2 to 2 hp motor and hook up an arbor (available at ace hardware) to the shaft, then attach your soft sander to it,

        if you need to slow it down a set of 5 wheel pullys, a shaft and 2 piller berings would do the job..

        among other things it would give you a spair motor for your lathe later,

        I been collecting motors for such things, but havent had any luck with these new washing machiene motors, the wiring is a headache.
        Dremel 1680 & Delta ss250 shopmaster

        Comment


        • #5
          KLD2246:
          WhenI decided I wanted to do some intarsia, it was apparent that sanders were an important tool for shaping and finishing. I had an old motor which I adapted as the basis for a two position sanding station. In the horizontal position I use pneumatic drums and in the vertical mode it serves as a spindal sander. The motor mounts on a hinged base. I bought all of the motor mounting hardware, drum sanders and shaft adapters at Lee Valley. I also have my traditional belt / disk sander and dremel tool for intricate sanding/shaping.

          I attached a couple of pics to give you a visual.

          Trusting these ideas, coupled with the previous posts, help you to move forward in your quest for a sander to meet your needs.

          Bob
          Attached Files
          Scrolling satisfies the passion for intricate creativity. My saw is an Excalibur EX21.

          Comment


          • #6
            In place of the foredom lathe I bought a variable speed 8" grinder from delta for about $120. The varible speed allows it to go below 1800 rpm. I purchased the flex drum sander from the same sight you saw the lathe and it works well - though I have not used it much.
            Dan

            -Just do'in the best I can every day

            Comment


            • #7
              There is a Habitat for Humanity Re-Use center near me. They sell donated supplies that they aren't going to use in their building projects. They routinely sell electric motors for $5-10 (the $5 ones are generally not wired) and the most common ones are in the 1/2 HP range. Also consider a cheap imported grinder from Big Lots if you have one near by. That's a sealed 1/2 HP motor for about $20. The sander I have connects to a motor without an adapter; I had to get an adapter for the drill press.
              -Andy

              Comment


              • #8
                Regardless of what motor you use make sure it does not go above 1800 RPM for sanding.
                Dan

                -Just do'in the best I can every day

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good point on the speed. The grinder actually goes faster than that but most appliance motors are below that. I mostly use my drill press and one reason, oddly enough, is counter to the original post. With it vertical, it is easier to see the point of contact. When I have had it horizontal, the workpiece blocks my view of the actual sanding. Either way, I generally move the piece across the sander for one or more passes and look at it after passes often but rarely while in contact.
                  -Andy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sanding devices

                    Hi,

                    Before you go too much further have a look at this site, for innovation and what others are not providing - www.piricdesign.com.au

                    Tony Ward
                    www.tonyward.org

                    Comment

                    Unconfigured Ad Widget

                    Collapse

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X