Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is It me or the wood?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Is It me or the wood?

    I cut a pattern into a Basswood plaque that is 1/2" thick with #5 FD-FSP blade I think, reverse tooth. When I finished I noticed that the cuts were kinda fuzzy and where I could I sanded with 220 then 320 paper and it was still a little fuzzy but not a bad. Also I noticed that some of the points that I cut were weak and chipped off without any help from me. I know poplar can be fuzzy but it'll sand out and the points usually stay stiff as long as you don't hit them. I'm not familier with Basswood and this was my first experiance cutting it. I cut something else into a Basswood "log" plaque that has the bark on the edges and it wasn't as fuzzy and it sanded down ok.
    Is this just the way Basswood is, fuzzy and weak, or was it the wrong blade type for the job?
    Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
    Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

  • #2
    Basswood is soft wood and stringy and can be on the fuzzy side. Cedar is also like that. As far as chipping goes it is possible you are not letting the blade do the cutting and pushing too hard. When using reverse tooth blades make sure the reverse teeth come through your table. Some saws and also if you put a zero cleance top on the table prevent this from happening. Even with reverse tooth blades does not get rid of the fuzzies entirely on the back side but does cut down on them.
    John T.

    Comment


    • #3
      The fuzzies are on the inside of the cut to on the flat. When I cut a point, as I did on this piece, I start at the tip and cut down the right then back out and then down the left side instead of rolling around the tip. I felt I would get a sharper point by doing it this way. I don't know if the reverse teeth are coming through or not. How would I find out?
      Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
      Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

      Comment


      • #4
        with the blade in and tight bring the blade up to the top check for the revers teeth.
        http://www.picturetrail.com/uid3726744

        Comment


        • #5
          John,
          Why does putting a zero clearance on the table top help prevent fuzzies on the back side of your work?
          Bill
          Delta P-20

          Comment


          • #6
            back me up

            I still like using old cereal boxes behind my work while cutting. This eliminates the fuzzies. I find if you sand your wood surfaces prior to scrolling, using the cardboard, or a sacrificial board behind your piece you will eliminate the need for sanding at all.
            If you use a piece of 1/8 hardboard or mdf as a backer you can even save the offcut for a template for your next project.

            As for the zero clearance insert, the more support you have under your work piece the less of a chance there is for fuzzies. I am not sure how much an insert would help, but it sure doesn't hurt, I use them all the time.
            Last edited by CanadianScroller; 11-18-2005, 08:31 AM.
            CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
            "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
            Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bronco
              John,
              Why does putting a zero clearance on the table top help prevent fuzzies on the back side of your work?
              Bill
              Bill

              Your question was answered and just to back it up it is like putting a sacrifical piece on the back of a project when you stack cut. The back piece gets the fuzzies. That was really not my intention when I mentioned the zero clearance top. It was to point out that if using reverse teeth blades the reverse teeth on some blades is not long enough to protrude through the top thus making them useless. Some saws the stroke is not enough to allow reverse tooth blades to protrude no mattter if there is not an auxilary top used. To check this as mentioned pull the arm to its top most point and look at the blade from the side and if you see 2 to 3 teeth of reverse showing you are good to go. Some blades have more reverse teeth than others and that is also true for the different sizes.

              Now as far as the fuzzies as was originally mentioned it is in the nature of the wood. You say you are getting fuzzies inside the cuts. This happens and can happen on other species of wood. Usually your soft woods but have had this in pieces of mahaganoy and also oak. There is little you can do unless you want to use a sharp knife and cut them away.

              One other thing a zero clearance top or backer board may help with breaking of delicate corners such as was mentioned because it gives support when the blade travels up and down. This is a good idea to use whenever doing delicate fret work.
              Last edited by jttheclockman; 11-18-2005, 10:47 AM.
              John T.

              Comment


              • #8
                Bill,
                All the answers you've gotten so far are right on, but basswood varies quite a bit. As a carver, I occasionally get a piece of basswood that is "punky" , or quite soft. Could probably be indented pretty well with the handle of a knife, let alone the blade. The stuff carves just awfully! It is really only good for the wood stove. You are buying basswood planks, and they are not really cheap, so you might try denting them is an inconspicuous place with the back of your fingernail (not the end), If it dents much at all, pick another one. Good northern basswood cuts pretty cleanly, with only a few fuzzies, and with a sacrificial board or cardboard, you should not have to work as hard as you did on that one. The softer, rather worthless basswood comes from the southern states. Good luck in the future, and don't completely give up on basswood - there are few light colored woods, even fewer readily available as rounds, so it is a good one when that lightness is needed.
                Sandy

                Comment


                • #9
                  I quess I never really understood what the heck zero tolerance was for,
                  but the support issue makes a lot of sense.I have a plastic insert for zero
                  tolerance that came with my saw I think I will start using it.
                  Bill
                  Delta P-20

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Everything said so far is good advice.You are cutting basswood "rounds" with bark all the way around if I'm understanding this right.If thats the case,you will have more of a fuzziness partly because the direction of the wood fibers in your piece.Think of it as you are in a sense pulling on the wood fibers as you cut them, and basswood is a very soft wood,although I do believe basswood is actually classed as a hardwood.I may be wrong on that,but I think it is.At any rate,remember the softer the wood,usually the more fuzzies,and yes,even a reverse tooth blade in properly doesnt remove every fuzzy.Your method of cutting,and backing out ,then going at it again to get a sharp,crisp point is actually a ok idea,but when backing down your cut,if your wood is turned at a slight angle,even the tiniest amount,it will cause the teeth to drag against the side of the saw kerf,leaving that cut looking like a bad blade was used because the blade is in a sense binding in the kerf (and magnified even more on softer woods).Try making that cut,then back up through it,then cut a chunk off and examine your cut for smoothness. Then,do that cut,and either turn off the saw and carefully back down it,then cut off a chunk and examine that cut,see if it made any diffrence,Im guessing it will. One other good way to cut out a spot like that is to cut past the sharp point,then go past a little bit and spin your piece,removing a little circle of wood from the waste piece as you head back to meet your pattern line squarely with where the point is at. This is only applicable if you actually have a piece that will be removed though. Them basswood 'rounds' are very nice looking,but you will find they require a bit more work,and patience,especially when it comes time to apply finish. Dont let this one project frustrate you too much,it will look great once your done. Show us pictures of it someday.
                    Last edited by lucky788scroller; 11-18-2005, 08:30 PM.
                    Dale w/ yella saws

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Basswood "round" didn't seem to get as fuzzy as the plaque did. I the plaque I cut aa pattern into it where as the round I cut the outside of a pattern to recess it into. Maybe I got a bad piece or something. Nothing major because I was just experimenting with them for a later project but the characteristics of the Basswood was something I wanted to know because I never used it before. Are they best used as just a backing piece or ok to cut into if ya' get a good round or plaque?
                      Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                      Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Basswood

                        The major use for basswood , or linden, is the manufacture of toothpicks. It is classed as a hardwood; however, the grain is sort of stringy and unless it is cut with a very sharp knife the fibers tend to crush rather than cut cleanly. I suspect that the "fuzzies" you refer to are created when the cuts are with the grain on your plaque. The basswood round, or slab, was cut across the grain, on an angle, when it was removed from the log. That's why you see all the growth rings and bark. When you saw the round you are always cutting across the grain, due to the angle of the original cut, regardless of the direction you cut. You get less fuzzies because all woods cut cleaner and easier when cut across the grain. The biggest drawback with basswood rounds is that unsupported "lacy" cuts are far more fragile because of the grain orientation and are easily broken off if not handled carefully. I've carved hundreds of projects from basswood and scrolled several basswood rounds. It's a good wood for it's intended purpose and I believe, with experience, you'll do well with it.
                        If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Neal is right. Basswood (the firmer pieces) is great for woodcarvers and I use a lot of it to carve cowboy figures and duck decoys, but have never tried it for scrolling. The "rounds", etc sold in Walmart and crafts stores is generally sold for woodburning projects (pyrography?) and is great for that. Personally, I don't think it is worth the effort to use it for scrolling, but to each his own.
                          Moon
                          Old Mooner

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I did notice that most of the fuzzies are with the grain cuts on the plaque. Those that are against are pretty good but still a tad stick up. I think that they'll work ok. for background pieces and inlay stuff and thats it. I tried something and learnt from it so it all worked out any way.
                            How does it take stain? Would I pretreat it like pine before stain?
                            Confuscious says, "The cautious seldom err".
                            Confuscious didn't own a scrollsaw either.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I would definatly pretreat it.You will be amazed how much will soak in to basswood,especially into a piece like youve cut.With a little care,it will turn out nice.
                              Dale w/ yella saws

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • will8989
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by will8989
                                None Linda. You need to find the right heat temp so it shrinks but doesn’t put a hole in the wrap but the tape doesn’t shrink or tear.
                                Today, 12:20 AM
                              • Linda In Phoenix
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by Linda In Phoenix
                                What thickness of film seems to work the best for puzzles?
                                The bags seem easier on the surface.
                                But the film seems like it is more versatile on size variations.
                                Yesterday, 03:24 PM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to Bruce, the one on probation
                                by will8989
                                Regulations are 150 square feet, this will be 144 square feet so we are good. He’s making it that size Since the sheets are 4’ wide. And the Shelves need to be 4” above my head!! It will be very specific.
                                Yesterday, 10:32 AM
                              • Sandy Oaks
                                Reply to Shrink wrap systems
                                by Sandy Oaks
                                As a framer, we have a shrinker wrapper at ArtCrafters. Very simple. Film on a roller, sealer attached, just roll off enough film, seal the film, insert object, seal other end and shrink with a heat gum. We also use Uline as a source. Not sure where our unit can from as it was with the shop when...
                                Yesterday, 09:46 AM
                              • NC Scroller
                                Reply to Bruce, the one on probation
                                by NC Scroller
                                I would make the shed 1" less than the size permits are required for. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS TOO MUCH SPACE....
                                Yesterday, 07:42 AM
                              Working...
                              X