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  • Slow Cutting

    i'm currently stack cutting pieces of 1/4" baltic birch plywood (2 pieces together for a 1/2" thick piece) and it seems like the saw is going too slow when going in a straight line. on curves, it cuts much faster. i'm using a delta s350 saw and i've tried a FD-SR-5 and a FD-P-5 blade with no increase in speed. am i being impatient?

  • #2
    Originally posted by novascroller
    i'm currently stack cutting pieces of 1/4" baltic birch plywood (2 pieces together for a 1/2" thick piece) and it seems like the saw is going too slow when going in a straight line. on curves, it cuts much faster. i'm using a delta s350 saw and i've tried a FD-SR-5 and a FD-P-5 blade with no increase in speed. am i being impatient?
    Great question! Wish I had a great answer.

    I will comment and let others correct if needed.

    One of the things that happens when stack cutting is the two pieces can separate slightly, this flexing can cause extra friction on the blade. When you are cutting curves the flexing is minimized. I really noticed this when cutting oak veneers.
    Since you are using BB Ply I doubt if the grain has anything to do with it. Even so, the BBply does flex in one direction more than the other due to the laminations.

    As for being patient, enjoy the cutting, relax and have fun. I know we like to see the finished product but the fun is in the sawing.

    Hope this helps and I hope too many people don't correct me
    Unless I am way off base. Then I will eat crow
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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    • #3
      thanks for your explaination. at this rate i would probably be better off not stacking the pieces.

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      • #4
        In Reference to stacking

        I have just finished cutting 63 snowflakes that are made using scrap hardwoods. All the layers I use are planned to 1/4" thickness. I stack cut two layers at a time, using an FD #5. I have tried stacking three 1/4" thick stock and although it cuts fast enough, I can't cut as fine a detail as when I stack cut two 1/4" pieces.

        My suggestions are to make sure the blade is cutting exactly at 90 degrees.

        Use the FD #5 blade is fine for 1/2" cutting.

        Cover the pattern with clear packaging tape. If you didn't cover the pattern with clear tape, you will notice a big difference.

        Use a medium blade speed.

        I usually need to change to a new blade after every 1/2 hour of cutting.

        Hope this helps


        Gary MacKay

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        • #5
          Relax and have fun is the key but to answer part of your question. When you are cutting straight lines especially when they are with the grain the cutting is slower than if you are cutting across grain as you get when making curves. This is true with all woods some little more pronounced with the heavy grain. Woods like mahagony not so much. Make sure when stacking all grains are going the same.
          John T.

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          • #6
            You got a lot of good answers. Make sure you have good tension on the blade, if not, the blade just does not cut right.
            Glue is very hard on blades, they have told me that the FD-TC holds up better agains glue than the FD-SR. A # 3 or # 5 would be the best.
            Mike
            SD Mike

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            • #7
              I think its mainly as already stated,the direction of the grain . The ply does tend to cut slower,creating more friction,more heat,and more fatigue on the blade.Also,Mike is right,go to a FD TC . A Two way cut blade #5 should do it great.Good luck
              Dale w/ yella saws

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              • #8
                I stack cut a lot of ornaments using 1/4" plywood stacked 3 or 4 high. I know that I go through a LOT of blades because they seem to dull very quickly when cutting the plywood. And I can tell when they are getting dull because it becomes very hard to cut and very slow. Then the burning begins. No, I don't use the clear packing tape - I haven't found it to help me at all.

                So - get a brand new blade and see if that helps. Make sure the layers of wood are securely stuck together. How are you holding them together? If you are using double sided tape that will also affect the cutting speed of the blade.

                Whenever you cut a thicker piece of wood, whether a single thick piece or a stack of thinner wood, it will be slower than if you cut a single 1/4 inch thick piece of wood. Depending on how detailed your design, it is still quicker to stack cut than to cut one at a time.

                T
                Theresa

                http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  i'm using nails to hold the 2 pieces together. i may put a couple more in it
                  to make sure they're truly stuck together.

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                  • #10
                    slow cutting

                    I have never used nails to hold the pieces when stack cutting wood.

                    I use double sided tape and my favorite a glue gun. With the glue gun
                    you only need to place about four small glue dots in the waste area of
                    the wood you are cutting. When using the glue dots the pieces you are
                    cutting just fall out when you are done. If you need to remove glue dots
                    then use a razor blade.

                    Gary M

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                    • #11
                      i find the double sided tape i've used so far works too good, it's next to impossible to separate the pieces. tried using a glue gun but the glue tends to harden to quickly before i get the pieces stuck together, creating gaps.

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                      • #12
                        Sticky situation

                        I like to tape with masking tape, all around the edges.
                        I haven't tried this yet but you could try spraying temp adhesive on both sides of a piece of paper and placing that between the wood, like frozen hamburger patties.
                        It may hold tighter and not be too bad to peel apart.
                        As for the double sided tape. if you can place it in spots that will be waste, like the edges of middle of the project, you won't need to separate it.
                        CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                        "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                        Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by novascroller
                          i find the double sided tape i've used so far works too good, it's next to impossible to separate the pieces. tried using a glue gun but the glue tends to harden to quickly before i get the pieces stuck together, creating gaps.
                          Two things are happening here and you being a newbie let me help. The method you choose to stack cut is purely a matter of choice. What works for one may not be the best for you. With that said you mentioned trying double sided tape. Now this method works but you must use the right tape. If you are using carpet tape that is the stuff with the fibers running through it and is hard to tear or cut that is too strong of tack. Look for 3M double sided tape found in any craft store or walmart or big Home Depot next to the adhesives in the paint dept.

                          Now to your problem with the glue thing here again there is a method and the method is not to put the glue between the pieces but to put the hot glue on the edges to keep the pieces together. Any glue between will leave gaps and cause other problems. You cut all the interior cuts first and then cut the outside shape thus cutting off the glue. Any method will work just that there is a way of doing each. So do not let someone tell you their method is best it is a matter of what is easy for you. But methods have been mentioned such as the nail thing. There is good and bad with that also but if done right it works well. Any further questions feel free to ask. I am sure they will be answered.
                          John T.

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                          • #14
                            HI nova all good info guys but my way is spray glue on both sides of a piece of paper comes apart like taking off a patern.use that to stack cut hard wood and ply works good for me .
                            Last edited by jimp11; 10-02-2005, 06:33 AM.
                            http://www.picturetrail.com/uid3726744

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                            • #15
                              all good ideas, i'll have to double check. maybe i'm working with warped ply.

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