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  • Pattern transfer

    There are so many ways to transfer patterns to wood. This would be a good place to write some down and add some comments.
    When I first started cutting I would take a photocopy of the pattern, spray it with temporary adhesive and attach it to the wood.
    This worked out quite well since I didn't have to use my original patterns.
    I have found though if I cut on rough wood for a rustic appeal the glue method doesn't stick too well.
    Soon I ran out of glue so I used masking tape on the sides of the pattern. This was quick if the pattern wasnt to intricate.
    I have also used carbon paper and retraced the pattern. Once again the texture of the wood can make a difference.
    Sometimes I will use a woodburning tool to transfer the toner from laser printing or photocopies right onto the wood.
    The key here is to print in reverse, so that text and the image will come out the right way.
    This only works with Laser Printers or photocopies, not with inkjet.
    You can also use this method to enhance any of your projects, especially where text is concerned. Like this name tag I wear when scrolling at the fair.


    We can also go to the other extreme of just tracing patterns from templates. I placed formica under the wood and after I cut out the project I kept the formica pieces. This left me a template to use next time. Great if you are doing multiple projects.


    Any input or comments from other scrollers would be appreciated
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

  • #2
    Carl... one thing I've often thought about but never got around to trying: Using copy paper that is used for transferring photo images to T-shirts. It's an iron-on process that works similar to the heat tool method except any type printer can be used. The only draw back is that the clear coating on the paper is also transferred with the image. Might work well for puzzles if one used a nice white, close grained wood such as basswood. Actually, baltic birch should work even better. If I ever get this book finished I think I'll experiment a little with that. It's been in the back of my mind for a while now but I've always just had something more pressing to occupy my saw!!
    If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

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    • #3
      transfer paper

      Just dont use a laser printer for that
      My son works for HP and you would be amazed how many people ruin Laser printers by melting that stuff inside.

      That sounds like a great idea Neal. I know a lady at work who makes her own rub on transfers with an inkjet and mylar.....whooda thunk!
      CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
      "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
      Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

      Comment


      • #4
        I use masking tape and it turns out very effective.

        I use masking tape and it turns out very effective. I cover the piece of wood with masking take and then I directly glue photocopies of the patterns there. When the pattern is scrolled the masking tape is removed easily:

        http://www.finescrollsaw.com/medusa.htm

        Pedro.
        http://www.finescrollsaw.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Someone recently shared with me using painters tape first over the board. Then spraying an adhesive to the back of your pattern and placing it on top of the painters tape. The idea is that it comes off easier.

          I've tried it, but have not found that to be all that more difficult than just spraying and placing pattern on the wood. Then using a heat gun to pull it off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Neal,
            What book? Is this something we should know about? Or is it something everybody else already knows? Or is it a novel? ? ? ? ?
            Sandy (?)

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            • #7
              Sandy...No it's not a novel. I'm doing a "how to" book for Fox Chapel on segmented portraiture. There will be several North American and African animals included. Maybe 18 to 20 patterns. Maybe more. I'm having a little fun with it. I think those that like doing segmented portraits will like it. I'm trying to make my patterns produce realistic portraits rather than charicatures of the animals. The jaguar and lion I have in the gallery will be in the book. I have a tiger pattern coming out in the next issue of SSW magazine so you'll get an idea of what the book will be like. I have 9 patterns done and am looking for more animals. I'll welcome any suggestions as I'd like to put projects in there that people really want to do!! So far there is an antelope (sable), bobcat, wolf, lion, lioness, White tail buck, Jaguar, giraffe and cheetah. Tell me what you like and I'll try to draw it up and put it in there!!
              If it don't fit, don't force it....get a bigger hammer!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Neal, if you find the space I would love to see a pattern or two of bears. The patterns I have thus far don't really look much like they should, it's nice to hear you will be focusing on realism rather then an artistic impression of what critters could look like. Best of luck and I look forward to your release.

                Todd
                Todd

                Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Grizz
                  Then using a heat gun to pull it off.
                  I feel like banging my head against a wall right now. I have been spraying the paper and placing it on the wood and after the project is complete I spend another 20 minutes picking little peices of paper off my project.

                  A heat gun! Now why in the heck didn't I just think of that before?
                  Todd

                  Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                  Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

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                  • #10
                    Carl - the methods I use you mentioned. Depending on the complexity of the design I either photo copy and glue on (I like to use an elmers glue stick rather than spray glue tho) or a template that I trace around. I never thought of using the formica and cutting it with the saw - I will have to try that!

                    I have heard you can use an iron to transfer a photo copy - haven't tried it myself.

                    For those without a heat gun - a hair drier works to in removing patterns.

                    Theresa
                    Theresa

                    http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                    http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rivari
                      I feel like banging my head against a wall right now. I have been spraying the paper and placing it on the wood and after the project is complete I spend another 20 minutes picking little peices of paper off my project.

                      A heat gun! Now why in the heck didn't I just think of that before?
                      The key is not to overheat the paper (I have found), be a little patient heating up paper, then start on an edge and begin to pull keeping the heat pointed at the point where the pull is at.

                      (I feel like I just gave away a secret recipe for BBQ)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Theresa,

                        I use the 3M 77 spray and have no problem taking the pattern off the wood. I never use a heat gun or a hair dryer. I'm not the only one using the 77 glue. Anyone who uses another glue and is satisfied, stay with it.
                        The mistake that most make is that they use too much spray or don't wait long enough before they put it on the wood. A trick I learned from Mr Spielman was that when the pattern would get loose, just take a strip of Sotts tape and put it lengthwise in front of the blade. It will hold long enough until the glue holds the pattern again.

                        Mike M
                        SD Mike

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                        • #13
                          Mike - I've used 3Ms spray glue, and some other brands, and still do occasionally if I am scrolling something large. BUT - my shop is in my basement, and the only place I will use the spray glue is outdoors - so it means running up and down the stairs with my wood, along with good weather conditions! I've found spraying in below zero weather just doesn't work!

                          I will admit - most of what I scroll is small - ornaments, crosses, jewelry - so using the gluestick (which I keep right on my sanding table) works great for my projects.

                          I will remember your tip on the tape - I do hate trying to hold down the paper with one fingernail - especially when the fingernails are cut short!!

                          Theresa
                          Theresa

                          http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                          http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am also using the 3M 77 spray, I only have it because the cheaper stuff I use to use was out of stock. My experience with the other brand was that you really had to hose the paper down good or else you would be forced to use ALOT of scotch tape because the pattern would come off. Maybe I need to adjust my over spraying habit?

                            I will still incorporate the heat gun tip to further ensure a nice clean pattern removal.
                            Todd

                            Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

                            Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Neal,
                              Maybe this should be in a different thread, but about the book - the critters you've mentioned sound great, and I agree with Todd about the bears. Also, maybe a baby something, or a little creature, like a racoon, or a possum, or a rabbit. Something really tough to do well, because of the softness, or fuzziness - 'ya know what I mean?
                              When can we expect your book?
                              How do we preorder?
                              Can you tell I'm excited about it?
                              Waiting on pins and needles (so to speak - maybe more like sawdust and teensy blades)
                              Sandy

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