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  • Stacking

    I have a few questions concerning the best way to stack wood so I can make multiples in a single cutting.

    First, what is the best way to secure the individual layers so they are not sliding around? I know clamps are out of the question and gluing them seems rather odd.

    Second, if I am stacking is there a general rule of thumb concerning the thickness of the wood? The thicker the wood or layers the more difficult to get a good cut...is that correct?

    Third, thank god for a begginers forum so I don't feel like a complete idiot.

    All suggestions are appreciated.
    Todd

    Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

  • #2
    I've heard several ways to stack cut...and most depend on what you are cutting.

    1. Use double-sided tape between each layer to hold them together
    2. Use a few dots of wood glue in the waste sections of each layer, clamp, let dry and cut
    3. Wrap the whole stack with tape in both directions and put the pattern on top of the tape
    4. Hammer brads or small nails into the waste sections. One suggestion was to hammer over an anvil, that way the nails would immediately be flattened.

    As for how thick...I'll defer to people with more experience than me. I tried to do a compound cut today and, well, I'll stick with writing for now!

    Bob
    www.GrobetUSA.com

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    • #3
      I like to stack not higher than 3/4". The best method is to use a brad nailer. If the brads are coming through, I cut off most with a plier and than sand it nice and smooth on my belt sander.
      I don't think many use glue, takes way too long, waiting till it is dry and you might have too much room between the pieces, so that a blade with reverse teeth is only good for the bottom piece. I know that some use tape around it but you never will get it solid as with brads. With two way tape, you have to do a lot of peeling the little pieces off the wood, also a chance breaking some small pieces. If you don't have a brad nailer, drill first a hole smaller as the brad and than hammer the brad through the hole. Don't use an anvil if you use solid wood, like oak, you might break the pieces in have.
      Mike M
      SD Mike

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      • #4
        You can also use hot melt glue on the edges to hold together. I will not go above 1" thick because the bottom layer starts getting distorted.
        John T.

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        • #5
          Good point about the anvil Mike! I didn't think about how that would affect hardwood. The person who suggested it was using plywood! You explained that much better than I could have!

          Bob
          www.GrobetUSA.com

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          • #6
            Thanks for the input folks.

            What you all responded with almost seems like common sense. The hotglue gun technique would be quite easy considering that it sets up quickly and also that if any actually got onto my work it is easily peeled off. I'll try what each of you had to say and find what works best, I suppose it will depend on the type of job and the material I am using.

            Now if someone could tell me how to fix the project I dropped on the floor last night I would really be amazed, I beleive it is in 5 or more pieces.
            Todd

            Hawk G4, Dremel 1800

            Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

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            • #7
              I have been there and am sure alot of others. Do not be too hard on yourself and just chalk it up to a practice piece. That is usually what happens when you want to stack cut things is try different methods and see what works best for you. Good luck.
              John T.

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              • #8
                Now please tell me why I need a brad nailer. I just use tiny brads and a tiny hammer -- stacking my layers over a waste piece of wood. Then, like 3-M. sand off the brad tips on my belt sander.

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                • #9
                  Nancy,

                  A brad nailer just keeps you from hitting your thumb as much

                  Bob
                  www.GrobetUSA.com

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                  • #10
                    I find that it is much easier to keep everything alinged using the brad nailer. Just pull the trigger and wap it's done, perfect. But, you need to weigh the cost in the equation; air compressor and nailer. Have an electric also, but don't think much of it. Have a real problem with brads and a hammer cause I've got big hands and big thumbs hurt big with hit with a hammer.

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                    • #11
                      Oh....
                      Little hands are so seldom an advantage.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't use brads because I often dont have waste around the outside -- though I know I could add a little and cut it off. Instead I use the same spray glue I use to adhere the pattern. Following the instructions for "temporary bond" (wait a minute after spraying before putting the pieces together) and spraying quite lightly allows me to pull even very delicate pieces apart after sawing without breakage. You have to be careful to remove all the glue by sanding afterward, or it shows up something awful under the finish.

                        I use a very light spray of glue, then tape around the whole thing to prevent burning and then adhere the pattern to the tape. Works for me, though I can see the advantage of using brads, too.

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                        • #13
                          everyone has their favorite way to hold the stacks together. Mine is the hot glue gun that was mentioned earlier. If any gets onto your project, a hair drier will soften the glue enough to remove it.

                          How high to stack depends a lot on the origional thickness of the wood, and the type of wood. I will stack 2 layers of 3/4" pine, 3 layers of 1/2" pine, when it comes to plywood, I don't stack as many layers - 4 layers of 1/4". 1/8" I may use 6 layers.
                          If I am cutting Oak instead of pine or cedar, I won't use as many layers.
                          T
                          Theresa

                          http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                          http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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                          • #14
                            fixing broken projects

                            Originally posted by Rivari
                            Thanks for the input folks.

                            What you all responded with almost seems like common sense. The hotglue gun technique would be quite easy considering that it sets up quickly and also that if any actually got onto my work it is easily peeled off. I'll try what each of you had to say and find what works best, I suppose it will depend on the type of job and the material I am using.

                            Now if someone could tell me how to fix the project I dropped on the floor last night I would really be amazed, I beleive it is in 5 or more pieces.
                            If I had a dollar for every project that got broken I would be rich.
                            Most of the breaks happen when people are handling the projects at our local fair.
                            I use wax paper on a board. The pieces are glued together with woodglue, although I had an oldtimer tell me superglue would be better, due to expansion and contraction.
                            To hold the pieces of fretwork together I use pins stuck into the board.
                            On thicker pieces I use springclamps......really they are clothespegs, way cheaper. Make sure the glue is thin enough that it wont add to the bulk of the project and distort it when reassembling.
                            Good luck.
                            CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                            "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                            Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Power Rules!

                              Originally posted by Nancy_G
                              Now please tell me why I need a brad nailer. I just use tiny brads and a tiny hammer -- stacking my layers over a waste piece of wood. Then, like 3-M. sand off the brad tips on my belt sander.
                              Nancy! You should know it is a POWER TOOL. And men believe if they are going to do anything, the first choice is always a Power Tool!

                              Silly you

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