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another way to do a sketch photoshop

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  • JimSawyer
    replied
    I can see this as a wood-burn, or a charcoal or conte' drawing.
    and of course I see the value for inlay...
    I know my way around PS6, but I haven't played with sketch-up much...
    I may have to revisit this..
    I'm forever learning here...
    ...Awesome...

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  • orely1005
    replied
    Originally posted by Joel Kaufman View Post
    Being a newbie, I certainly can't provide woodworking advice, but coming from a printing and graphics background I do know some tips that could be used for pattern making. The only issue I see with using Photoshop for patterns is that it generally will render soft and or continuous tones, which makes patterning difficult to stencil off of. Or it would take a lot of time to accomplish.

    Illustrator, Photoshop's companion program, can turn the soft and or continuous tones of a photograph and convert them into hard definitive lines, which I would think works better for woodworking. The Live Trace function is very powerful and only takes a minute (literally) to do. They can be edited and tweaked to your desire. Below I used the parameter of 4 total colors, 6 total colors and 7 total colors in the picture with no additional editing...this could be handy for inlay or intarsia work.

    If any one is interested in knowing more about this, shoot me a message and I'll try to fill you in.
    Attached Files

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  • idigjars
    replied
    Cool methods. Thank you for sharing your know how. Paul

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  • journeyman
    replied
    Thanks for the info Joel. I do my own portrait patterns using Photshop and Paintshop Pro X3. I also use the Bamboo graphics pad. Between them all I can get some reasonable results. I am always looking for better programs and different approaches to pattern making. I was interested in your reference to Illustrator. My daughter has the program installed on her laptop. I will see if she will let me have a play around with it.
    Mick

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel Kaufman
    replied
    Another approach I plan to use...

    Being a newbie, I certainly can't provide woodworking advice, but coming from a printing and graphics background I do know some tips that could be used for pattern making. The only issue I see with using Photoshop for patterns is that it generally will render soft and or continuous tones, which makes patterning difficult to stencil off of. Or it would take a lot of time to accomplish.

    Illustrator, Photoshop's companion program, can turn the soft and or continuous tones of a photograph and convert them into hard definitive lines, which I would think works better for woodworking. The Live Trace function is very powerful and only takes a minute (literally) to do. They can be edited and tweaked to your desire. Below I used the parameter of 4 total colors, 6 total colors and 7 total colors in the picture with no additional editing...this could be handy for inlay or intarsia work.

    If any one is interested in knowing more about this, shoot me a message and I'll try to fill you in.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Magic
    replied
    Thanks for the information. I'm always looking for a better mousetrap ! Magic

    Leave a comment:


  • Big_red_S
    replied
    I use a different method (almost the same results though). I used it when I was making a the pages for the Disney Autograph Book I made my kids (http://www.scrollsawer.com/forum/gen...-saw/24579.htm).

    1) Duplicate the photo by selecting Layer > Duplicate Layer
    2) Make sure the duplicated layer is selected and go to Image > Adjustments > Desaturate. This will make this layer black and white.
    3) Increase contrast - Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast
    4) Duplicate the black and white layer and go to Image > Adjustments > Invert. This will make the image look like a negative (almost).
    5) Change the blend mode to color dodge. This will make the photo almost completely white.
    6) Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Like Cathie said adjust for best effect.

    I think the only difference is that I made it black and white.

    Leave a comment:


  • ncsealeveler
    replied
    Thanks for the info.My trys at patterns have never made it to the printer.Tony

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  • jowshu98
    replied
    Thanks Cathie. I just gave it a shot on a photo of my god daughter and her horse. Was a little concerned after changing to color dodge mode as my screen changed to white with nothing there. All was fine running the gaussian blur and adjusting the detail. Looks good so far but now comes the fun part of making it cuttable.

    Thanks again for sharing,

    Don

    Leave a comment:


  • cathiejade
    replied
    Mike , yea thats the oldest of the shirt pullers lol. he's more the , ' hey mom, im going to clean this saw dust up now " and the one you have to worry about where he's at every second in fear he's off making his own project LOL thanks im confused on how to do the teeth/gum area on this one so i havent even thought about printing it yet

    Leave a comment:


  • wood-n-things
    replied
    Is that one of your shirt pullers? Nice looking fella, nice job on the pattern as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • cathiejade
    replied
    heres an example
    Attached Files

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  • cathiejade
    started a topic another way to do a sketch photoshop

    another way to do a sketch photoshop

    Im not sure if this would work well with portraits or not , as I'm not experienced in scrolling all that much , but , wanted to share another way to create a sketch thats finer in detail for anyone interested.

    open the photo you want to convert.
    create a copy of the background layer
    on the new copy of the background layer, go to >image>adjustments>gradient map ( make sure your color palete is set to black and white.
    create a copy of this black an white layer
    go to image>adjustments>invert ( this will make it look like a negative image)
    then in your layer pallete choose " color dodge" as your mode
    then go to filter >blur>gaussian blur . adjust the slider til you have the amount of detail you want, the more blur you apply the more it will look like a photo rather then a sketch.

    click ok, if you want your lines to be darker, do a " level " adjustment

    if i can figure out how to get the prompts to work to set it up for an action , i'll create it and post the link for anyone interested . if anyone tries this let me know how it works out for creating patterns

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