Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Making Puzzle Pieces in Adobe Photoshop Elements by Jay Pittman

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Making Puzzle Pieces in Adobe Photoshop Elements by Jay Pittman

    Thanks to Jay P for sharing this tutorial
    Making puzzle pieces in Adobe Photoshop Elements
    By Jay Pittman

    • Open a blank project
    • Select the "custom shape tool" on the edit bar
    • Click the dropdown menu beside "shape", then click the right-pointing button in that window and choose "all element shapes".
    • Select one of the puzzle pieces (there are four)
    • In the project window, draw that puzzle piece once.
    • Click on Layer > Flatten Image
    • Using your "magic wand tool", click once outside the piece to select the white area around it.
    • Click on Filter > Other > High Pass. Set Radius to 5 or so. Click OK.
    • With only the outside still selected, click on Image > Adjustments > Threshhold. Set threshhold = 150. Click OK.
    • Click once in the background to de-select everything.
    • Click on Image > Adjustments > Invert
    • Now you have the outline of a puzzle piece. I am sure their are quicker, neater ways to get to it, but this is what I know, and thus all I can tell you. Next.....
    • Using your "eraser tool", erase the corners of the puzzle piece.
    • Using your "magic wand tool", click on one side of the puzzle.
    • Click on Edit > Copy.
    • Minimize the puzzle piece window, and open the project you are trying to make into a puzzle.
    • Click on Edit > Paste. The puzzle piece side will appear near the center of your project.
    • Use the "move tool" to resize, relocate, and rotate the puzzle piece side.
    • Click on Edit > Paste to add another puzzle piece side, and move/size/rotate it as needed. Repeat until you have the pieces made.
    • With nothing selected, click on Layer > Flatten Layers
    • Use the "pencil tool" and the "eraser tool" to clean up the puzzle lines.
    Kevin
    Scrollsaw Patterns Online
    Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

  • #2
    Uh oh. Better hide this before Carter sees it

    If you don't want highly regular pieces like this will generate, it's easy and more flexible to cut the pieces freehand (pick a starting point and cut out something squiggly and roughly piece-sized. Rinse and repeat until the puzzle is complete).

    I use a dry-erase marker to sketch in any special pieces that I can't freehand. The ink wipes right off of the photographs I use for the puzzle images.

    --Rob
    Does the shape of my puzzle pieces say something about my personality?

    Comment


    • #3
      Hehehe True Rob, but not everyone likes to cut their stuff freehand (I know, I'm one of them and Jay has some terrific puzzle patterns).
      Kevin
      Scrollsaw Patterns Online
      Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

      Comment


      • #4
        Just what version of Elements did u use? Elements 9 does not work

        Comment


        • #5
          This thread is from 2008 So what ever was current or nearly current back then..
          "Still Montana Mike"

          "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
          Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

          Comment


          • #6
            I did not ask ? about being current, I asked "what version of elements did he use.

            Comment


            • #7
              Well I was pointing out that the thread is nearly 4 years old and neither person post here any longer. I was attempting to help.
              "Still Montana Mike"

              "Don't worry about old age--it doesn't last that long."
              Mike's Wood-n-Things LLC

              Comment


              • #8
                I have both Elements 4 (which is at least 4 years old) and just recently updated to Elements 10. Both versions have the features that Kevin put together (I just checked ver 10 and the puzzle pieces are still there. The rest of the steps are standard processes.
                Don

                An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.
                Benjamin Franklin

                At twenty years of age the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.
                Benjamin Franklin

                A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.
                Benjamin Franklin

                www.dogwoodstudiosnh.com

                Comment

                Unconfigured Ad Widget

                Collapse

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                Working...
                X