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  • About My Shells.

    I've had a few questions about how the shells are made. I don't want to just give you step-by-step instructions because that would take away from your own creative process. The shells I make now are much more complex than the first ones I made but still the same in some ways. So here is a hint that should be enough to get you started.

    I'm sure most of you have seen or made scroll-sawn baskets. The pattern is the outline of the base and each slightly larger level is an offset from the previous line. These are stacked and glued together to make the basket. The wood you use is of course flat on both sides and equal thickness.

    What would happen if the wood was a wedge and had its thickness tapering from one edge to the opposite side? The resulting basket would start leaning towards the thinner side as it grew. If allowed to continue growing like this, an imaginary line connecting the center point of each layer would form a circular arc instead of a straight line. The resulting basket will look more like a Horn of Plenty. The angle that the wood is tapered will control how fast the form curves.

    Try starting with a small circular shape for the tip of the horn. Set your saw to make a beveled cut where the bottom side of each layer is slightly larger than the top and use each layer as a pattern for the next. The bevel angle should be big enough to give the sides enough thickness.

    The horn of plenty will make a good Thanksgiving decoration. You will have plenty - plenty to think about going from this shape to a nautilus shell. It's a start.
    Steve Garrison

    www.stevengarrison.com

  • #2
    Sorry I did not reply earlier, I have a hard time understanding instructions that are written. I am going to print this out and go play in my shop.What you have written should be good enough to follow and after I do that I will comment.
    The other thing is you are so far ahead of what I do with wood its a bit scarry. But thanks for the info, I will try to do it justice.

    Alan.
    Alan and Rafi.

    In our house, if you have to bend over to pet a dog it ain't a real dog!

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    • #3
      Great! I hope you make something really cool - I would like to see what you come up with. My skills probably aren't any better than others in these forums, I just do things that are different. There's no black magic to it.
      Steve Garrison

      www.stevengarrison.com

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      • #4
        Thanks Steve for the hint. I will have to try it out to see what I can come up with.
        Bill

        I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

        Visit my Gallery
        and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

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        • #5
          Steve your shells are just beautiful!
          KathyRo
          Really New Scroller
          NEWMy Website, Robbins Nest Creations
          www.robbinsnestcreations.com
          My WCI Scroller Gallery
          http://www.scrollsawer.com/gallery/s...0/ppuser/12025
          My WCI Wood Carving Gallery
          http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.co...00/ppuser/3480
          Measure twice cut once

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          • #6
            1st attempt at shells

            Hi Steve, here is my first feeble attemt at making some shells. These look more like clam shells. I made these from an old 2x6 douglas fir stud I had lying around in my shop. Sanding the outside of the shells to smooth them up should be no problem but I would need to get some kind of curved gouge to try to smooth the inside of these things. At least it does give me some idea of how you make your shells.
            Attached Files
            Bill

            I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

            Visit my Gallery
            and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

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            • #7
              Steve Garrison

              www.stevengarrison.com

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              • #8
                Bill . Patrick Spielman and Carl Roehl's book Making Wood Bowls with the Router and Scroll saw shows how to make a jig using a rubber ball which might work for you .
                Roger

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                • #9
                  Steve, I used a FD #5 blade to cut them out and I did cut them at a 30 degree bevel. I did cut another one at 25 degrees but it made the steps too big. Now I just need to make the distance between the circles less and the bevel less to make more sections.
                  Bill

                  I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

                  Visit my Gallery
                  and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like them........ Don't know what Id use them for.... But I like the idea.....


                    www.pajarostudiowns.com
                    Excalibur EX-21 fanatic
                    One of the Chosen few



                    "The Rumors Of My Demise Have Been Greatly Exaggerated......I am retired!!!!!!!".

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                    • #11
                      Re: My Shells

                      The most functionality I get from my older shells is as a catch-all for keys and coins. The more recent ones are strictly non-functional and for viewing only...or selling them to get money for buying functional things
                      Steve Garrison

                      www.stevengarrison.com

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                      • #12
                        By the way, gang, Steve just agreed to do an article on the shells with us.

                        Steve and I are working together to get the article in the magazine as soon as possible, but he has a lot on his plate right now...so...I can't promise how soon we will be able to get it in the magazine.

                        Bob
                        www.GrobetUSA.com

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                        • #13
                          Great to hear Bob!
                          Please have lots of pictures - I seem to learn better by seeing.
                          Theresa
                          Theresa

                          http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

                          http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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                          • #14
                            Bill, Just draw one line at a time and use the wider side of the last section you cut as the pattern for the small side of the next section. This will eliminate the steps in the joints. It is going to change shape slowly from a circle because the thicker part "grows" faster than the area on the narrow side of the wedge. Or you can stick with perfect circles, have steps to sand off, and force the pattern shape to stay circular.
                            Steve Garrison

                            www.stevengarrison.com

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                            • #15
                              Thank you Steve for the information. I was just using AutoCad to try to lay out another one and things just were not working out right but by using the last one cut out to mark the next one really does make a lot of sense and eliminates some of the problems I was having. Each one seems to get more eliptical as you go from one to the next. I can see that you have learned much by your trial and error but you were very persistant and really created some wonderful works of art. Keep up the good work my friend.
                              Bill

                              I have an RBI Hawk 220-3 VS

                              Visit my Gallery
                              and website www.billswoodntreasures.com

                              Comment

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