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  • New Scroller

    Deleted by Author
    Last edited by Ghornet54; 02-27-2008, 01:11 PM.
    Charles

  • #2
    congrats on saw

    http://www.foxchapelpublishing.com/p...ls.cfm?PC=1026 Thats the book you want! Many others will agree. The only thing that you will need besides that book is lots of practice. welcome aboard, Ask any questions you have, someone here surely will help you out. Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to this big happy scrolling family. You came to the right place for answers to your questions. When I started, I bought a book titled "Scroll Saw Handbook" by Patrick Spieman. You can go to half.com and find one starting at .75. I'm sure others will have other recommendations. I thought this book covered things pretty well for a beginner.

      As far as the wood bouncing around, first make sure the blade isn't in upside down. The teeth must face down. Also, keep your fingers exerting slight pressure on the wood, close to the blade, but be sure to move your fingers before the blade makes contact.

      What saw are you using and what wood are you working with?

      We also like to see a person's first name in your signature. This is an easy place to make friends. No matter what happens, don't get discouraged. It all takes practice and ask as many questions as you like. That's what this forum is designed for - scrollers helping scrollers.

      Good luck

      P.S. Where are you from?
      Mike

      Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
      www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

      Comment


      • #4
        Deleted by Author
        Last edited by Ghornet54; 02-27-2008, 01:12 PM.
        Charles

        Comment


        • #5
          Once you have drawn first blood there is no turning back

          Another good resource is Rick Hutcheson's site
          He has put together some wonderful videos that will show you hints and tips.

          Feel free to ask any questions about scrolling here, There is lots of good advice. You will surely feel at home here.

          Carl
          CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
          "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
          Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't worry about having no artistic skills. You don't need any; just an ability to follow a pattern line, which is a manual skill that can be learned quite quickly. It's not unusual for newcomers to have problems when they start cutting, but with a little practice you'll be amazed at how rapidly your skills improve.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome Charles
              I have only been scrolling a couple of months and would heartily second the suggestions you have already received. Especially helpful to me was to use the John Nelson lesson book Dale recommended. I also have the P. Spielman book and like it as well. You will enjoy this forum greatly as I have.
              Dale M.

              Comment


              • #8
                Deleted by Author
                Last edited by Ghornet54; 02-27-2008, 01:12 PM.
                Charles

                Comment


                • #9
                  I honestly find that blade breakage is usually due to tension on the blade. Either the blade is too loose or too tight.
                  You are correct in looking for blade tension, sharp turns and type of wood.

                  If the blade is too tight even slight heat or sideways pressure can cause the break.
                  If the blade is too loose then it can cause the arms that hold it to bounce with a whipping action. The bounce will then apply even more tension when the two arms move apart slightly.

                  Tension has to be the hardest thing to learn in scrolling. Some people say pluck the blade till it rings, well there is a whole range of ringing tones.
                  Others say tighten it till you only get 1/8 of an inch deflection. I kind of do both.
                  You may also want to slow the saw down initially. That will help too.
                  I was fortunate that I had someone show me the correct tension when I started.

                  You may try and find someone close to you who can let you listen to a taut blade.
                  Maybe even a high school shop.

                  Hope this helps a little
                  CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                  "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                  Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is an interesting site that will explain the tension with the actual sound the blade should make. http://www.intarsia.com/ScrollSawTension.html
                    Mike

                    Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                    www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      sawdustus of hiawatha

                      Charles,

                      Welcome aboard. This is a great fraternity (sorority) of informative, nice people. Great advice on the books to find and the blade tension to seek. The bouncing could be due to your blade being in upside down. Been there, done that. Make sure that the teeth are facing down towards the table. If you are using a reverse tooth blade, then the bottom 3/4" or so of teeth will face up but most will still face down. Other reasons for blade breakage when your tension is set well are:

                      1. Size. Using too small a blade for the thickness of the wood. I like a
                      # 5 or # 7 for 1/2" wood. Basically, the thicker the wood, the bigger
                      the blade.

                      2. Speed. The thinner the blade, the slower the speed of the saw. The
                      thicker the wood the faster the speed. Both within reason.

                      3. Force. The harder you push the wood, the more likely to break the
                      blade. Let the saw do the work.

                      Happy scrolling.

                      George
                      A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                      George

                      delta 650, hawk G426

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Charles,

                        Welcome to the group.

                        One reason for blade breakage can be side pressure, when cutting you may inadvertently be applying lateral pressure that can snap the blades.

                        When cutting a straight line, depending on your brand and model of blades, you may need to align your cut at an agle when facing the saw.

                        Which means that if you are squarely facing the saw, you could nee to cut at a front right to back left angle in order to follow the line, this is normal in some cases. But be carefull not to push sideway on the blade too hard at the same time, it doesn't seem easy to do, but it's actually harder to explain than to do it

                        Do visit Rick H.'s website, it is full of valuable information

                        Good luck to you,
                        Marcel
                        http://marleb.com
                        DW788. -Have fun in the shop or it isn't a hobby anymore.

                        NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Deleted by Author
                          Last edited by Ghornet54; 02-27-2008, 01:12 PM.
                          Charles

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ghornet54
                            I definitely like scrolling, but haven't tried any hard patterns yet. I might change my mind when I do.

                            Charles in Kentucky
                            Charles, we don't want to hear that. The main difference between hard patterns and easy ones is the amount of patience required. The rest just comes with practice.

                            It's nice to see someone from Kentucky on this site. I've never been to your state but next summer my wife and I are driving down there for our 30th anniversary. I've heard it's beautiful country and the smallmouth bass and crappie fishing is outstanding. Keep pushing ahead with your exciting new hobby and keep posting and maybe I'll look you up when I get there.
                            Mike

                            Making sawdust with a Dremel 1680.
                            www.picturetrail.com/naturephotos

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Also, it wasnt mentioned, but many times blades get broken because of the way its being inserted into a fret hole.If you are feeding the blade down through a hole it doesnt happen much, but if a bottom feeder like me (feeding the blade up through the frethole when changing holes), if the wood isnt placed on the table correctly, you can kink the blade slightly, weakening it.If bottom feeding,undo the blade from top clamp, then feed it up thru the hole, and pinch the blade end tween your thumb and index finger and pull up on the blade, and let your wood selfcenter itself as you set it on the table. Then rehook the blade at top clamp and tension it. I do believe a lot of your trouble is the blades themselfs.watch for Mike M (3-M) on here and explain your dilemma, perhaps he could suggest the perfect blade for your particular scrolling. Dale
                              Dale w/ yella saws

                              Comment

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