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  • Hello Everyone

    Hi Everyone,

    Just joined - got referred here from UKWorkshop group by Gill.

    I live in Wales in the UK - hence my handle. Taffy is a nickname for people from Wales, and Turner, as I am a woodturner.

    I have been turning for years now, but recently have been drawn to try my hand at intarsia after seeing the work of Judy Gale Roberts and Gerry Booher, and being inspired to try to produce such beautiful work myself. I do have an ulterior motive - I own a ski condo at Breckenridge in Colorado, and I would like to decorate it with some intarsia of wildlife native to that region.

    I am just in the process of looking at which scroll saw to purchase - currently the favorite is the Delta 40-570 (there isn't a huge selection of saws available here in the UK). I would have liked the Hegner Multicut 2V, but it is just too much money at the moment. The Delta seemes to be the best compromise between price and performance.

    Any one who has any advice regarding which saw to get, or intarsia in general, please feel free to wade in - as I am a complete beginer, all advice will be greatly recieved!

    Thanks

    Gary
    PS - Please ignore any typos - I am a dreadful typist!!!
    Gary

    My saw - Axminster AWSF18

  • #2
    Welcome aboard.

    Don't worry about typos, several of us have that dreaded typo virus that is going around.
    The Delta 40-570 is a very serviceable saw. You are sure to like the quick blade clamps and the variable speed. The price is reasonable too.
    If you can get the stand for it get that too.

    Some will tell you the saw has a lot of vibration, one of the side effects of moving a blade up and down. If you do not get the stand you can clamp it to a sand box, Gill has a good pattern for one.

    Good luck and enjoy your new hobby
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Gary

      It's nice to see you over here . You'll find a wealth of very skilled and friendly scrollers who'll be only too happy to help you in any way they can.

      The Hegner Multicut 2V is a lovely saw but it is quite pricey, especially if you don't yet know how much scrolling you'll be doing. I think you're right to be focussing on the Delta 40-570 which is a very good saw and a proven workhorse. It should suit you fine.

      I take it you haven't got a saw at present? If you ever find yourself in the Worcestershire area, I should be able to find one you can practice on until you acquire a saw of your own.

      It might be a bit optimistic to tackle intarsia at the very outset, but don't worry - you'll soon have the neccessary skills. I'm told it's not difficult but I've never tried it myself. I'm quite happy concentrating on segmentation. I would be surprised if somebody here doesn't suggest you get hold of a copy of John Nelson's Scroll Saw Workbook when you start using your saw. It seems to help an awful lot of newbies but I can't speak from personal experience because I've never had a copy.

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

      Comment


      • #4
        RBI has a super sale going on its G4, but I imagine it would cost a small fortune to ship it to Wales.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks everyone for the welcome!

          Carl - yes, it was the variable speed and quick blade clamps that drew me to the Delta saw. My typing suffers from the drawback that I can't type anywhere near as fast as I can think! Also, I think my keyboard has a virus that causes the keys to move around when I am not looking!

          Gill - I was going to get the Hegner copy from Axminster that you talked about over on the other forum, but I managed to get a copy of the manual from them, and the blade clamping arrangement looks a mess - it would make piercing cuts a bit of a nightmare (if you want I can email you the manual - PM me your email address if you are interested). I would welcome your opinion on the clamps to be honest, as I have never actually seen a scroll saw in the flesh!

          I already have a copy of John Nelson's book, together with Judy Gale Roberts Wildlife Intarsia and Easy to Make Intarsia.

          I was planning to cut my teeth on some basic scrollwork before tackling intarsia - I am expecting the learning curve to steep!

          Thanks for the offer of a loan saw, but I was planning to buy the Delta saw at Yandles, which is taking place on 8/9th September, so not long to wait!

          Did you find a reliable source of white wood here in the UK after?

          One other question - do you know of a source of Judy Gale Roberts plans here in the UK, as it doesn't appear from their website that they are prepared to ship overseas?

          Rolf - I have read good things about the RBI saws, but as you say, shipping to Wales would be expensive, plus we operate on 240V, not 110V, so I would need to buy a transformer as well.

          Regards

          Gary
          Gary

          My saw - Axminster AWSF18

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Gary

            PM on it's way!

            The Yandles show should be good. Unfortunately, it's a bit of a trek for me and I've already got commitments for that weekend .

            White wood? In the UK? You've got to be joking! Next you'll be asking if there's anywhere you can get Baltic Birch Plywood . Holly or imported maple are probably your best bet, with lime and sycamore as distant seconds. I recently found an importer of a white gel stain which looks promising although I haven't ordered any yet myself. I understand that some scrollers use a white stain such as this for their intarsia because it helps to preserve the whiteness longer. Exposure to UV light will dull even the whitest of woods over time.

            I don't know of a UK source for JGR patterns as such, but Amazon UK seems to carry quite an extensive selection of her books. Incidentally, she occassionally contributes articles to Scrollsaw Woodworking & Crafts magazine (our esteemed hosts) which can be delivered to the UK.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome to the group Taffy

              Charlie,
              Charlie
              "Everything Happens for a Reason"
              Craftsman 18in. 21609

              http://wolfmooncreations.weebly.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Gary,
                Welcome to the group
                ...enjoy !
                ...~Robert~
                DW788 and Hawk 226

                " Please let me grow to be the man my dog thinks I am "

                Comment


                • #9
                  hI gARY, WELCOME to the family! No matter what saw you get you'll soon find it hard to drag yourself away from it. Do show us some photos of your work once you get going.
                  Cheers. Teresa .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Gary,

                    I think I left a transformer behind when I lived near Cambridge back in the early seventies.
                    Rolf
                    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wont to add my welcome too, Gary is it. gosh you guys talk funny. you say you have typos. Ha. I have to get my dictionary out when Gill post. if i could only explain things like she can. and spell too. Ha. you have come to a great group here. we all love to help, even when we (me) don't know what the H we are talking about. there is lots of turners here. and the addiction goes on. if you love woodworking. this is the place to go. we love all of it. from carving, furniture, fretwork, (whicth i love) and intarsia. segmentation, mag, and on and on. I am so glad you are here. and you will get lots of help here. I have a Hegner too. and its a top of the line saw. I found i don't wont to waist time with anything else. but i know there are great saws out there, with a lot smaller price to pay. I think you can do most, and i mean Most anything you put your mind too. on any saw. except Mag. hope you stick around, we would love to see your projects, any projects. and love to have you in are little family, you say your doing a project in colorado. thats my home state. i will be looking foward to that. your friend Evie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Welcome, Gary,
                        At first when I saw your screen name I was thinking of turning taffy on a lathe - very messy, even just to imagine. I'm sure glad you turn wood like so many of us!
                        If you want to get right into intarsia, you might want to get a copy of Judy and Jerry's book Intarsia Workbook. Like all the "workbooks" in the Fox Chapel stable, this one takes you through the making of intarsia from the start in little baby steps (just as we need in the beginning). They have some cool patterns.
                        You might also want to check out Kathy Wise intarsia patterns (another fine contributor to Scroll Saw Woodworking and Crafts) (try KathyWise.com)and Sue C. & Toni B. (check out the "Trail Mix" patterns)- they are also frequent contributors to this forum and to the magazines (try ChrestensonBurghoutDesigns) Each pattern maker has a bit different flavor to the patterns.
                        I think that if you are careful, most scroll saws can handle intarsia. If you're not careful, none of them will make you successful. Guess how I'm still learning that one!!
                        Sandy
                        PS Don't sweat the typos - we can translate most of them!
                        Sandy

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Gosh - thanks to everyone for the warm welcome.

                          This sure is a friedly forum!

                          Thanks to everyone for the advice so far. I have got several books on scroll saw technique, and two of Judy Gale Roberts' books on inatarsia, which I am just in the middle of reading now.

                          All I really need now is a saw! Should be getting one in a few weeks time, then I am off to stay in my condo in Breckenridge for a week (I know it's too early to ski, but I have never seen the place without snow, so it will be an interesting trip), and then when I get back, I will start learning how to cut accurately to the lines (hopefully), and then move on to some simple intarsia projects.

                          I will be sure to keep you all posted on my progress.

                          Regards

                          Gary
                          Gary

                          My saw - Axminster AWSF18

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Welcome Gary!

                            I think it's so cool to hear from scrollers in other countries.

                            As for cutting straight lines, if you haven't already read or heard, scroll saw blades tend to drift to one side. That means that when you are cutting, you will need to compensate for the blade wanting to "pull" to one side of the line or the other. They aren't like a table saw or even a bandsaw, (even though some drift is typical with bandsaws).

                            This is caused by the way most scroll saw blades are manufactured. Some types of blades are better than others. It isn't a real big deal, once you get used to it. But if you aren't aware of it when you start out, it can be really frustrating.

                            Good luck and have fun making sawdust!
                            Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bill,

                              I had read that scroll saw blades cut to the right. I have also read about Olsen Precision Ground blades, which cut in a dead straight line. My book (John Nelson's Scroll Saw Workbook), says that these are the best blades in terms of leaving a smooth finish, but he doesn't recomend them for beginners as they are too aggressive.

                              Does anyone have any experience with these blades? Couldn't they be made less aggressive simply by slowing down the speed of the saw?

                              Regards

                              Gary
                              Gary

                              My saw - Axminster AWSF18

                              Comment

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