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  • Chipcarving knife

    I have been using Wayne Barton's Chip carving knife.I would like your opinion Flexcut chip carver.And who sells them.

  • #2
    Re: Chipcarving knife

    Sam,
    I dont know where your from but probably your best bang for your buck is to order it from 'Chipping Away' in Kitchener, Canada they have a huge web site and if your from the US your $ goes a lot further.
    Colin

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    • #3
      Re: Chipcarving knife

      I agree with Colin, I bought mine from Dennis at chipping away, when I got it, the grind wasn't right and no matter how much I sharpened and honed, it just wasn't right...I called Dennis and he put another in the mail and when I received it, I put the first one in the same package and mailed it back to him.....great knife! great people to do business with!

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      • #4
        Re: Chipcarving knife

        Sam - I have a flexcut and the Dennis Moor (much like the Wayne Barton knife) knives. The flexcut is a good knife, but the Moor is better. The reason being the design of the handle. It is much easier to get the angles correct and the knife does not tend to wobble/twist during a cut. IMHO you've got the best your going to get. As for where to buy a flexcut - any of the suppliers mentioned above are good.

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        • #5
          Re: Chipcarving knife

          I have to agree, Dennis Moors knife is the way to go. The way that the blade is angled, it makes it so much easier to carve with. It is a real quality tool.

          Also, like Hi_Ho said, he treats his customers right . I bought all of my chip carving stuff from him.

          Chris

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          • #6
            Re: Chipcarving knife

            I know a couple or REALLY GOOD chip carvers that swear by their Wayne Barton knife and do beautiful work. If I was you, I would consider staying with what you have. On two different occasions, I have showed up to do one of their workshops and they insisted that I junk the knife I had (which was a lot prettier, ) and use one of their extras. By the way, they didn't even try mine.

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            • #7
              Re: Chipcarving knife

              don't know about all that, and not sure about someone that would call something junk without even trying it? This I know for sure...I have the Wayne Barton knife, when I started I bought the chip knife and stabber and his book..this is the light handle knife not the dark...I used it for quite awhile and like all of us decided to try some others...long story short..I like Dennis Moors knife much much better than the Barton..but, just so I am not talking something down myself without trying it lol, I have not tried their expensive one, the one with the dark handle..I do however own their small chip knife with the dark handle..it is ok, just way to small for my hand....just my humble opinion.

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              • #8
                Re: Chipcarving knife

                Sorry completely forgot! I also have a flexcut chip knife, ...it is still in the drawer, not a bad knife (in fact I have a lot of flexcut) but I still think Dennis Moors knife is head and shoulders obove the rest. there...done...finally...now I can rest my head....all this remembering geez LOL :

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                • #9
                  Re: Chipcarving knife

                  I'll add my compliments to Dennis Moor and his carving tools. I took a weekend chip-carving course from Dennis, on one of his swings through Ohio. He and his son are really good folks. They developed their chip carving knives to overcome some of the deficiencies they found in others that were available in the market. The shape of the handle and the blade set the correct carving angle naturally when you hold the knife as they instruct. They take the time to teach sharpening, which is absolutely critical in chip carving. They also make the point that chip-carving is one form of carving that requires the 'P' word (patience) and continual effort, if you want to become proficient. If you stop chip-carving for a year and then start again, you may be awhile getting back to your previous level.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Chipcarving knife

                    I want to thank all you guys for your advice.I just put an order in to Chipping away for their Moore knife.Thanks again

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                    • #11
                      Re: Chipcarving knife

                      For anyone interested in chip carving you may want to check out
                      www.2carve.com
                      they have a couple free tutorials.
                      (relief carving also)

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                      • #12
                        Re: Chipcarving knife

                        Well said hi-ho. I agree with your assessment of the Chipping Away folks and their products. I purchased their video series some time back and would recommend them to anyone wishing to learn chip carving.
                        Cheers
                        Ric

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