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Hello from Oklahoma

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  • Hello from Oklahoma

    Hello everyone. I am new to scrolling, as in so new my dad bought me one for Christmas and I haven't even cut a board yet. Still trying to figure out how everything works and how to place the patterns to boards and so on. If anyone wants to give me tips or whatever on what kind of wood to use for a beginner and all the things I will need it is much appreciated.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    welcome to scrolling. Choose inexpensive wood to begin on. Your pattern is attached directly on the wood, or over a layer of tape, either masking, or clear packing, applied to the wood. The tape helps lubricate the blade while cutting, and helps in pattern removal after your done cutting.Apply the pattern using spray adhesive from an aerosol can. I prefer 3M Super 77 spray adhesive, but others work to.Take your time, keep your blade tensioned good,and mostly, have fun. Let the saw cut, and just play around on some wood to get the feel of how it works.I prefer 1/2 inch thick hardwood, like oak, walnut, cherry, ect,it seems to cut the best for me, theres a bit more resistance then using pine, but even pine is a good wood to start out on. Plywood too is good, but you should try getting some good quality plywood, with no voids in the center layers,or once you hit a void, it catches you off guard, and you wander off your pattern line fast. When you wander off your pattern line, gradually work your way back to the line, dont make an abrupt correction. Once the pattern is removed, slight blade wanders will only be known by you, nobody else will see it. Get some good blades, the menards, home depot blades are way to expensive, and some are pretty much junk.Mike at www.mikesworkshop.com sells great blades , and is very helpful in getting you going. Another place to try is www.sloanswoodshop.com for blades.Get a copy of scrollsaw workshop magazine, theres a wealth of info in each issue, as well as vendors for everything you'll ever need. The main ingredients in being a great scrollsawyer is experience. So, practice, practice, practice, and mainly, have fun! Now, tell us a bit more about you, and your saw, and what ther tools you have at your disposal. Soon you will be hooked on scrollsawing, its great! Dale
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #3
      Hmmm a bit more about myself. My father purchased a 16" Tradesman from Lowes for me, it is single speed. I have looked at getting a better one but figured I would learn with this one. I live in kind of a small town so there is not many places to buy anything here. I can't even find a scroll sawing book if that tells you anything. I have a lot of free time on my hands and am looking to fill the void with something constructive and fun (fun to me that is). I work shift work working 12 hour shifts. I work 4 days, 7 off, 4 nights, 3 off, 3 days, 1 off, 3 nights, 3 off. So as you can see I am going nuts with boredom.

      As far as tools all I have right now are hand drills, circular saws, table saw, miter saw and that is about it. If I enjoy what is to come I will purchase more, but until the time comes I think I might be able to swing by with these things.

      Any suggestions on other tools I may need?

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      • #4
        Hey Dust,
        Welcome to scrolling.When I first started I was overwhelmed by all the different
        things to learn. I would sugget to get "Scroll Saw Workbook" by John A. Nelson
        it is a great starter book and has beginner exersizes and easy starter patterns and the book guides you through each exersize.The best thing to do is to take your time when you saw until you get use to the saw. There are great people on this site willing to help and give you the best advice. Practice, Practice like Dale
        said is what you need and soon you will be making great projects.
        Happy Scrolling,
        Bill
        Hey we have something in common I work the same 12hr. shift you are on.
        Last edited by bronco; 01-28-2006, 04:03 PM.
        Delta P-20

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        • #5
          Many of us are in the same position you are, living in a small town. The wonder of the web will be your best friend. The tips on Sloans and Mikes are some of the best you'll get. Also, Wildwood at http://www.wildwooddesigns.com/ is another great site to check out and get "Scroll Saw Workbook" by John A. Nelson at any of these sites mentioned. Armed with this, you'll wonder where the time has gone and you'll feel great about your accomplisments very quickly. Keep checking this site and be sure to read all the old posts and you'll be up and running in no time.

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          • #6
            you have a scrollsaw, and a drill, thats all you need to get you started. The other tools will come in handy as well.I would lose track of what days i work, and what days I have off with that screwey schedule.If finding things for scrolling are hard to get locally, thats where the web comes in so handy.You can get everything on this thing! Wood is available from the sloanswoodshop, as well as blades and a bazillion other things. Wildwood has the best variety of patterns, and also blades and wood and other stuff. One very reasonable place for scrolling woods is www.petersonscustomlumber.com , another being www.ocoochhardwoods.com Many great books can be purchased by clicking the Fox Chapel Publishing link on this site.Tons of great, free advice is right here. The only thing left is getting a little experience, and that you can do easy enough. To just play around on your scrollsaw, you can get a piece of 1-by lumber (actually 3/4" thick), even pine,and with a pencil draw up shapes, or a cursive signature, and try following the line.Just take it easy, and let the saw do the work. Soon, instead of "going nuts with boredom" , you will be having too much fun to go to work! Dale
            Dale w/ yella saws

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bronco
              Hey we have something in common I work the same 12hr. shift you are on.
              You don't happen to work for an oil company down there in texas do you? If so we may even work for the same one.

              Well I tried my first time tonight. Needless to say it didn't go well. I can't saw a straight line or circular pattern to save my life. Plus I broke a blade due to tightening up the tension to tight. Still haven't found where it shot off to, but atleast it wasn't my face.

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              • #8
                I work for Invista (Koch) use to be Du Pont close to Victoria.
                Are your blades breaking or slipping out of the holder? If they
                are slipping out of the holder you can sand the ends before putting
                them in the blade holder.On cutting a straight line the blade has a
                burr onit which makes the blade cut to the right just move your
                pieceof wood to adjust to the cut.
                Bill
                Delta P-20

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                • #9
                  Not sure if it broke or slipped out. I still haven't found it..lol. I work for ConocoPhillips. Hey you never know maybe we will work together one day too. Seems like we are buying everyone else. Just wish they would give me some free gasoline.

                  Thanks for the information on straight line cutting. I will give it a try.

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                  • #10
                    Dust,
                    Go to Mikes Workshop.com and click on the Q&A section there are a lot
                    of good tips there.Conoco use to be part of Du Pont for a while.
                    Bill
                    Delta P-20

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                    • #11
                      Dust,
                      Please get some safety glasses pronto! Hopefully no flying blade or fragment or bit of wood will ever come near your eyes, but it is too easy a fix to be certain. Without the use of your eyes, you will have an even harder time scrolling a straight line!
                      See if you can get some poplar at your local lumberyard - it isn't TOO expensive, and it cuts very nicely. You will need better blades than came with your saw - the advice above should get you there, too. And order SSW - you will be enthralled at the great variety of projects you and your saw can tackle.
                      About straight lines - a scroll saw was never intended to be the tool of choice for really straight lines, so don't worry too much about them at first. Later you will wonder what all the fuss was about, as you gain experience and skill.
                      About other tools you might want - the list could go on forever, but most of them are "extras" - you've got the saw and drill, I'd recommend a sander - power or a sanding block and an assorted pack of grits. You will be creating some fuzzies on the back as you drill and saw - those have to go. You will also like to sand the surface of your wood before attaching a pattern - saves so much trouble later.
                      PS Welcome to the group. I hope you have some fun.
                      PPS I was born in Norman OK - back when kids still rode dinosaurs to school.
                      Sandy

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