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Marc Tovar Wooden Gear Clock Spring 2007

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  • Steve:
    That sounds like a very reasonable solution to the problem. I will be visiting Wal-Mart in the next day or two and see if they sell the big packages of BBs.

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    • A New Look

      New set of hands for the clock - A bit more ornate than the originals
      Attached Files
      Steve
      Dewalt 788/with EasyLift

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      • Those look very nice!! I, too, wasn't crazy about the original hand design and was considering making a more artistic set. Any possibility you could take a closer shot so we could get a better view?

        One thing I have noticed is that none of the hands seem to show up very well. Don't know if it is just the photos or actually is true in real life. Anyone have a thought on how to make them more visible??

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        • Blades used and other ideas

          Hi all. My first post. I just finished my clock. It runs for about 20-30 minutes and stops. I need to polish my gears better I'm sure. I used Flying Dutchman blades from Mikes...the spiral ones. I'm new to scroll sawing, have a new Dewalt, and have virtually zero hours on a saw prior to this project. I,like others, was researching a wood gear clock when I saw the cover picture. The spiral blades for me are the best. How anyone could follow a line around a gear with a regular blade is nothing short of amazing....if not masochistic. I used 2/0 blades for all the 1/8" ply and #2 or #3 for everything else. All the brass and ply were fairly easy to find here in Oklahoma City from either Ace Hardware (K&B tubing and piano wire) and the ply from a local hobby store. I used premium Midway products 1/8" plywood made for airplane model building. It has 5 layers and is very stable. Marc even suggests laminating that for the other wood. A bit pricey but a great idea. Drill the frames at the same time to insure accuracy. Drill a hole through both, add a rod to maintain alignment, repeat for one other hole then drill away all the others. I recommend to cut all your shafts long. You WILL be disassembling the clock many, many, many times before you're done and it's easier if you have some shaft to grab and twist. Just watch out for interference with other parts. To insure the gears are round (especially the escapement), drill the center hole with a brad point bit, rough cut the gear out of the sheet, mount the gear on another piece of ply with a short piece of rod, clamp the ply to your disk/belt sander so that the gear blank barely rubs and spins and sand the blank round. Then just cut the notches for the teeth and you have a centered/round gear. Also, cut and sand all the parts until the pattern line goes away. That's probably standard procedure....but critical and never mentioned. The pattern side is always to the front of the clock for proper orientation of the gears. Sorry about the long post. All of these things are just fresh in my mind from my own build and thought I'd share. I have about 50-60 hours in the clock but I'm new to the scroll saw and anal by nature.

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          • Randy

            Here is a larger picture of the new hands. It's about as large as I dare make it without losing definition.
            True the hands are difficult to see from a distance. That's why I gold tipped them. They show up better against the black outer clock ring. Outside of making them wider or having a solid clock face (but that would cover the internal parts) or a different color I'm not sure how to make the hands show up better.
            If anyone else any ideas lets hear them!
            Attached Files
            Steve
            Dewalt 788/with EasyLift

            Comment


            • Thanks, Steve.

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              • Last edited by Randy; 04-06-2007, 07:24 PM.

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                • Randy...I use an aquarium pump! It works great!

                  Bob
                  www.GrobetUSA.com

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                  • Originally posted by ssoich
                    I used a bottle of steel BB's that I got from Walmart. They are steel but seemed to do the job, cheaper that buying a bunch of lead shot.....
                    Found a bottle of BBs at Wal-Mart!! The 6000 BB bottle cost $6.57 and weighs 4.5 pounds. Using the figures posted earlier by Neil, it turns out that BBs are a little cheaper per pound than lead shot; but since lead weighs a little more than steel, the total cost is a wash. Problem with using the BBs is you will probably have to make the weight tube a little longer to accommodate the extra volume.

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                    • Originally posted by BobD
                      Randy...I use an aquarium pump! It works great!

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                      • Wooden clock patterns

                        Originally posted by Shannon
                        Just heard from our printer that they will reprint the patterns for the Gear Clock and include them with the next issue. If you have the patience - you can wait for the next issue and get the complete patterns - or if you are eager to get started, you can download the corrections.

                        Our proofs showed all the pattern lines there like they should have been and it wasn't caught at the factory at press time. It's a lesson learned for all involved and I love the fact that our printer is so willing to help us make it right. (And I'm weaseling to see if I can use the flip side of the extra pattern pull out for additional patterns - got some big projects in this next issue)
                        Did the patterns get published. I sacrificed my originals for accuracy. Made a successful clock. But I would like to get another set of the patterns.

                        Dave

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                        • Yes,
                          They are published in the Summer issue, which has been sent to subscribers and will hit newsstands later this month!

                          Bob
                          www.GrobetUSA.com

                          Comment


                          • Set Screw Size??

                            I stopped off at the hardware store to pick up the set screws needed for the hands of the clock and immediately realized that I had a problem. The problem is obvious and I should have caught it while reading the article. Guess I was so busy concentrating on construction details that it just did not register.

                            Problem is as follows. The instructions call for a 1/8" dia. set screw. Well, there ain't no such animal. Set screws of that size are not identified by actual size; but rather by a number and thread count, i.e. #12-24UNC. If we take the instructions literally, the set screw that would correspond to 1/8" diameter would be a #5-40UNC. While that is a "real" screw size, it is also one that is not commonly carried at the home centers or hardware stores. The other problem is that the instructions call for drilling a 1/8" hole for the !/8" set screws. If one did that, the set screw would be loose in the hole and there would not be any way to snug up the screw to hold the clock hands on the shafts. So what to do?? I would like to hear what Marc has to say; but the answer seems pretty obvious.

                            It looks to me like you need to use a #6-32UNC hex or socket set screw in that 1/8" hole. A 6-32 set screw is a little larger in diameter than 1/8" so the screw threads should have a little wood to bite into. IIRC, it takes a 1/16" Allen wrench??

                            I would be interested to know what others have done about this situation?? Thanks.
                            Last edited by Randy; 04-21-2007, 07:47 PM.

                            Comment


                            • Set Screws

                              Randy, you are right. It is a 6-32UNC socket set screw. I buy them by the hundreds and furnish them with the MLT-13 plans that I sell. So it was an oversight on my part for not stating the correct set screw in the instructions.
                              cheers
                              Marc

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                              • Marc: Thanks for the confirmation!!

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