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Marc Tovar Wooden Gear Clock Spring 2007

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  • #76
    my only comment on this is WOW. I am keeping all this information close by because one day I will build myself one.
    Yours is awesome.
    Diane
    Dragon
    Owner of a nice 21" Excalibur
    Owner of a Dewalt 788
    PuffityDragon on AFSP

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    • #77
      Xeroxing The Pattern

      I got to the public library and made copies of the pattern to use for cutting the wood. Unfortunately they only had letter and legal size paper available so I had to shoot the front and back frames and the hour wheel in two parts and patch them together. Using original index marks on the pattern, I tried to match up the partial copies but they don't fit together perfectly. Did anyone else have this problem and if so how did you deal with it. Guess the simplest thing to do is visit a copy shop that has 11x17 paper??

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      • #78
        Another option I've found is using the open source version of Excel (just google it). If you cut and paste the image into that cell, the program will tile it for you. That is, if you want to use the computer. You should have the half-size drawings as a PDF...cut and paste the images out of Acrobat Reader, and enlarge them in freeexcel to 200%

        Thanks Gill, for providing this tip in the past!

        Bob
        www.GrobetUSA.com

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        • #79
          I Give Up!!

          It's really good to hear all of the success stories about this clock. I wish I had one to tell. I have tried just about everything I can think of to keep my clock running for more than two minutes with no luck. I have sanded/filed a few gear teeth and pinion leafs, polished every axle, checked every gear for rubbing or abnormal contact, triple checked to be sure my clock is hanging correctly on the wall, and I even added a little extra to the weight in case I got that wrong. Nothing is working for me.

          Ok, here's the couple of problems I've had during the construction: a warped gear (replaced), oversized gear teeth (filed/sanded), a scored axle (replaced and polished). I couldn't find the 'thin walled' PVC pipe the plan called for, so I had to use thick walled (schedule 40). I compensated by doing a quick calculation of what the inside volume should be for the thin walled pipe and adjusted a little for the thick walled pipe. I figured that if my calculations were off then I would be just a little under weight which is why I added a medium sized socket to the weight to add just a tiny bit more weight. None of this made much of a difference.

          What happens when I start my clock ticking is it will run fine for about 50 seconds, then the ecape wheel will begin to slow down and not do a full 'tick' without a little push from the pallets. I know this is a problem and did everything I could think of listed above and the only real improvement I saw was with the extra weight added. That managed to keep the escape wheel moving a bit better. Now I am noticing that the pendulum appears to be slowing down as it swings and eventually just doesn't move the pallets enought release the escape wheel and allow the clock to continue to run. It is still doing this every minute (about 50 seconds of smooth ticking followed by about 10 seconds of stubborn irritation). Also, I did not apply any shellac or varnish to any of the gears yet, so there isn't any in the teeth either. I saw something written earlier about 'polishing the teeth' (or something like that, I have to go back and read it all again). Does this really make a difference? Could that be what my problem is?

          Please help me!! I need some advice of what to look for!! I do want to build another one of these as a gift for my Mom, but not until I can get this one running.
          Jim
          DeWalt DW788 & Dremel 1680

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          • #80
            Friction

            Jim, go back and buff out each tooth with your dremel pad. No buffing compound. Also do the pinions. The teeth and pinions may feel smooth to your touch but they are not. If looked at under a magnifying glass they are coarse. It's like walking in sand. The first few steps are okay, but eventually you will stop. Be sure to burnish the axles and clean out the axle holes in the frame. Diamantle the clock, and work with the GW first, then the 2nd etc. Make sure everything is turning freely. Be sure to buff the pallets where they make contact with the EW teeth. Buff the tips of the EW teeth. Also the pendulum spring must have a snug fit into the pendulum. If it is sloppy and loose the clock will stop.
            If you are copying the pattern, find a copy shop that has a digital copier like a Toshibia, etc. They are most accurate. Be sure that the pattern is flat on the glass or it will be slightly distorted.
            cheers
            Marc

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            • #81
              Marc: Could you be a little more specific about what you mean by "buffing" the wheels and pinions, maybe even post a picture. I looked at the DREMEL web site to see what sort of "buffing" accessories they offered and found several options. They were called felt polishing wheels by the Dremel people and all of them "appeared" to be too big to fit in between the the individual teeth of this project. Are there other accessories that I have missed or is there some trick to using those felt polishing wheels that I need to understand??

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              • #82
                Thanks Marc, I'll give it a try with the gears. I don't really understand what you mean by "the pendulum spring must have a snug fit into the pendulum", but I'll go back and take another look at that part also. I did exactly what the directions said about using a wire fishing leader and the spring template. Maybe I missed something else or my pendulum top wasn't cut right.

                I appreciate your help and look forward to hearing a steady 'tick tock' for many years to come.
                Jim
                DeWalt DW788 & Dremel 1680

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                • #83
                  This post is for ssoich, I like the case you made for the clock. The top and bottom look kind of like cutting boards, is that what they are? It's an awesome stand

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                  • #84
                    To Jim....I had the same problem and I found out that I cut out my crutch slot a shade too big and that's what gave me all the problems. So, I shaved a piece of wood and glued it in there and sanded it to the same thickness as the brass rod and now it works.

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                    • #85
                      My clock is running! A few suggestions for other clock builders:
                      1. If you copy the plans, check your copies for accuracy. The best i could get from a blueprint shop was a runout of about 1/16" on a large gear. I sacrifieced my originals for accurate patterns.
                      2. Drill holes with a drill press. It is almost impossible to get them straight enough by hand.
                      3. When making the clock frame, check the thickness of your plywood before cutting the notches for the posts. If your plywood is metric in thickness, the notches cut according to the pattern will be too large and you will need to shim them.
                      4. Make a trial assembly and test your clock before final finishing. You will probably have to make some corrections so that everything fits well and runs smoothly.
                      5. Friction is critical in the escapement wheel and pallets, as Marc has pointed out. Make sure that the escapement wheel is not pinched between the minute hand sleeve and the spacer on the escapement shaft.
                      6. Don't give up.

                      dholkeboer
                      New owner of DW 788.

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                      • #86
                        Buffing

                        Randy, it is the felt pads. I use the ones that are about one inch in diameter and the smaller ones that are about half an inch in diameter. You won't be able to get the pads all the way down into the bottom of the teeth, maby halfway and that is where the action is. The pinions should be easier to buff. Buff them from every angle. You are removing the fuzz from the wood. Another method that I just tried and it works is a 1-1/2 inch long brass rod made from 3/32" stock. Put it in the dremel and polish up the wood with it.
                        cheers
                        Marc

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                        • #87
                          Thanks, Marc. The idea of burnishing the wood with a piece of brass rod sounds like an excellent idea to me!!

                          Now, if I could only get Steebar to get my supplies to me.....it's been 2-1/2 weeks and not a word from them.....I could get to working on this puppy.

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                          • #88
                            Buffing the Gear Teeth and pinions

                            Randy,
                            I had some luck with a short piece of 1/8" dowel slotted on one end to hold a piece of 800 grit wet or dry (used dry) sandpaper. I wrapped the paper a few times around the dowel, stuck the other end in my dremel and was able to get in the gears and pinions to make them smooth. I never thought of using the felt buffers that Dremel supplies. Learn something new every day I guess.
                            Last edited by ssoich; 03-23-2007, 10:14 AM.
                            Steve
                            Dewalt 788/with EasyLift

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                            • #89
                              Finishing the clock

                              Dan C.
                              I used a spray on clear wood deft to finish the gears and pinions with. The way that I kept finish from getting into the gear teeth and pinions was to keep the scrap blanks from the cutouts, insert the gears and pinions back into the blanks, lay them flat on my finishing table and spray away. Spray one side, flip them over when dry and spray the other side. Shellac to me was a bit messy and I think the Deft is probably a harder finish and dries quick.
                              Steve
                              Dewalt 788/with EasyLift

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                              • #90
                                Gluing Gears and pinions

                                For anyone getting ready to glue parts together here is a quick tip -
                                To keep the gears, pinions and pallet and collar in alignment while waiting for glue to dry use a piece of 1/8"diameter rod to hold them in alignment. That way the holes in the parts will line up with no chance if a piece slipping -
                                Check out the attached picture for a better detail -
                                Attached Files
                                Steve
                                Dewalt 788/with EasyLift

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