Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Workshop extension and major facelift - a work in progress - update at 17March

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Workshop extension and major facelift - a work in progress - update at 17March

    Hi all -

    Around the beginning of year I mentioned in a post that I was looking at ways to extend my existing workshop space to give me room to accommodate a midi lathe I had bought and to also allow me to undertake smallish carpentry projects in addition to scrollsaw work. Well, I finally have some movement on this issue to share with those of you who are interested in such things.

    My existing shop is sandwiched between our house and a boundary wall which runs away from the house wall at a taper giving me an awkward floor area which is 18ft long but just 4ft wide at the front door entrance expanding out to 7ft 5” at the back yard exit end. It has a sloping 'lean to' roof which gives me a maximum floor to ceiling height of just over 8 ft at the house wall side and 6ft height at the boundary wall side.

    Apart from a home made combination table saw/work bench, which usually stays just inside the exit end of the shop, my band saw, scrollsaw, compound mitre saw, planer and lathe are all on mobile workstations which I wheel out onto a concrete pad which extends from the exit door to the opposing boundary wall of our smallish back garden. I do most of my larger carpentry or metalwork on this pad.

    Since acquiring my lathe I’ve been producing a heck of a lot of wood turnings which naturally tend to blow all over the garden, much to the displeasure of my darling wife. I have to confess that this has been a deliberate plow by yours truly to convince Norma that I need to extend my shed over the pad to give me a covered space to work in and contain all my mess! The good news is that without too much prompting from my side Norma suggested I do exactly this so last week I drew up plans and have started the construction work.

    My existing shop will be extended by 13ft in length (correction! - length will be 11 ft - not 13ft) and give me a maximum width of 8ft 4ft at the exit end whilst still retaining a small concrete pad running up to the opposing boundary wall.

    At the moment I'm fabricating and installing the metal upright posts which will support the roof cross beams after which I'll install the roof. Next up will be the side walls after which a local contractor will install the doors and windows. After this I will need to level the floor and set about cladding the inside walls and installing the electrics, lighting and dust extraction line. My plan is to complete this work within the next 2 weeks.

    Tied in with this work I then want to replace my home made table saw/workbench with a new multi purpose work bench which will incorporate a Skilsaw portable table saw, model SPT99T-01 (8 ¼” diam. blade), which just arrived on my doorstep this morning, my compound mitre saw and a router table.

    I have a lot of work to do but this keeping me out of mischief and no way am I finding our self-imposed Covid lockdown boring, plus, unlike for my many friends north of the Mexican border, the weather here in Central Mexico has been absolutely gorgeous the past month for working outdoors.

    Attached is a plan of my extension which I had to draw up to get Norma’s approval I'll add construction updates and images to this thread as my work progresses.

    If anyone has any questions/criticisms/suggestions etc: on this update feel free to shout out.

    Cheers,


    extension.jpg
    Last edited by jim_mex; 03-11-2021, 07:11 PM. Reason: Update to post title
    Jim in Mexico

    Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
    - Albert Einstein

  • #2
    Just curious about the 13' extension. Building material, especially sheet goods are in 4' increments. Why 13'?
    Scott
    Creator of fine designer sawdust.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just curious about the 13' extension. Building material, especially sheet goods are in 4' increments. Why 13'
      Good observation Scott! You found a mistake on my side

      The shop extension should read 11ft, not 13ft! I screwed up my conversion from cms to feet and inches.

      You had me worried though that I'd screwed up the placement holes for the uprights and cross beams so I just went out to check they were correctly located. Fortunately they were. Big sigh followed

      Note I didn't go for a full 12 ft in length because a) I needed a couple of inches of overlap at both ends for the Durock panels which I'll use for the roof covering, supported by 3/4" MDF boards placed between the cross beams, and b) whilst I would have liked to increase the length by a couple more feet there is a raised flower bed butting up to the opposing boundary wall which would restrict my access to the wide end exit of the extension.

      I'll shoot a photo tomorrow of the metalwork in place which I should finish installing today.,

      Cheers
      Last edited by jim_mex; 02-24-2021, 07:16 PM.
      Jim in Mexico

      Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
      - Albert Einstein

      Comment


      • #4
        Jim that makes perfect sense. With the price of building materials, they are sky high in the US and still climbing, I could not see you wasting materials.
        Scott
        Creator of fine designer sawdust.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jim_mex View Post

          supported by 3/4" MDF boards placed between the cross beams
          Jim

          DON'T USE MDF for that stick with real lumber. If the roof ever developed a leak that MDF would be the first thing ruined.

          Tim

          In God we trust, all others must pay cash!

          I don't want no bargains, they always cost me more money.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey Tim - it's been a while pal! Great to hear from you.

            Point taken care of! Yesterday I ordered 3 sheets of 3/4" construction plywood to be delivered this morning to start mounting the roof

            Check your private messages ...

            Cheers
            Last edited by jim_mex; 02-27-2021, 09:38 PM.
            Jim in Mexico

            Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
            - Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi – progress on my workshop extension has unfortunately gone much slower than I originally anticipated but this past weekend I finally finished putting up the roof and have this morning started building the walls

              My slowdown was due to a number of issues...

              Firstly - my wife Norma, my sister-in-law, who lives next door to us and who’s house butts onto our back garden, plus a lady she rents her upstairs apartment to, are all in the education business and due to Covid-19 restrictions have been working from home on-line during the past months. Since most of my early work involved heavy use of hammer drills, masonry hammers and chisels, chop saw cutting and grinding of the structural steel work, I started this project by creating a lot of noise. Almost immediately the ladies' noise abatement society kicked in with the complaint that my noise was interfering with their online teaching classes and they presented a strong request that I limited making excessive noise to outside of a schedule they presented to me. Being the socially compliant kind of fellah I like to think I am I controlled the urge to suggest they all buy noise canceling headsets and shut their windows and instead acquiesced to their wishes whilst muttering a few Anglo Saxon swear words under my breath. Because of this I immediately lost 50% of my working day between Monday to Friday plus all of Saturday morning up to early afternoon.

              Next, added to this restriction the Mexican weather then threw a curved ball at me which further limited my working hours! For the past 6 weeks in what is normally a dry and cool winter period for us in Central Mexico we have instead been experiencing continual cloudless days of abnormally hot weather since mid January. Working on the roof construction under a blazing midday to mid afternoon sun with temperatures daily hitting between 80 – 85F and peaking with 4 consecutive days last week at 90F I quickly realized that in order to avoid being identified as more of a redneck than some folks already think I am it was just too uncomfortable to work under such heat and I abandoned the idea.

              A further constraint was my lack of prime fitness! This project is the first real example of physical work I’ve undertaken over the past 10 years up to my retirement last year. During that time I’ve had a few medical issues which fortunately I’ve been able to overcome but not without a few after-effects. Continually climbing up and down ladders resulted in days when my prosthetic knee was complaining strongly in the evening and crying out for massages of Deep Heat. Maintaining my balance on an inclined roof with only one functioning eye and a resulting lack of depth perception, particularly when you know there is a 30 ft drop down to the neighbor’s house on the other side of my boundary wall, has been a challenge, plus I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve bashed my head on a beam or tripped over some steel lying on the floor on my blind side. Yeah, I know that I should wear a helmet but stupid is as stupid does! Lastly, but by no means least, suffering from internal plumbing problems as a result of removal of a cancerous prostate gland is a nuisance I could definitely do without. I’ll not go into the details of this last problem except to say that too much bending and lifting makes very frequent toilet trips an evil necessity and woe betide you when either dust inhalation or looking into bright sunshine starts you sneezing! Nuff said!

              My last restriction is something I imagine I share with many of you older forum members. Whilst I like to think I’m young at heart its a fact that the speed at which I can accomplish tasks these days seems to be inversely proportional to my advancing years. Whilst the mind and spirit might be willing the body doesn’t always keep up with the pace.

              So, these are my excuses for not progressing as fast as I would have liked.

              Fortunately, now the roof is up my noise levels should diminish to a more tolerable range and I’ll be able to work during most of the time the ladies have their online classes. Additionally whatever the weather we will have in the coming days I’ll be much cooler working under that roof rather than above it!

              So, having put up the roof I’ve now started work on the walls where I’m using concrete blocks for the bulk of the work and will use glass blocks for the windows.

              One advantage of now being retired is that despite always being impatient to get things done I do have time on my side and I'm confident that slow and steady will win this race.

              So here’s where I am at the moment. I'll post some better photos over the weekend with hopefully more progress to show.

              Cheers!


              shop extension.jpg
              Last edited by jim_mex; 03-12-2021, 09:47 AM.
              Jim in Mexico

              Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
              - Albert Einstein

              Comment


              • #8
                Excellent writing. Made me smile and chuckle several times. And feel kinship in the 'age affliction' problems. Nice to see progress being made. Glad to know you are no longer on the roof.
                Jo Labre - in beautiful Racine, Wisconsin

                Mostly, I don't know what I am doing - but I am doing it with GUSTO!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Somebody told me once that as we get older, we learn to work smarter, not harder. I must not be old enough. I'm not able to work nearly as hard as I did when I was younger, but I haven't reached that point where the "smarter" has kicked in yet.

                  Looks like some good progress, despite the roadblocks you've encountered. Up here, some building materials have been subject to extreme price increases and chronic shortages. Are you seeing similar conditions there?
                  Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill Wilson View Post
                    Somebody told me once that as we get older, we learn to work smarter, not harder. I must not be old enough. I'm not able to work nearly as hard as I did when I was younger, but I haven't reached that point where the "smarter" has kicked in yet.?
                    Bill I haven't seen the smarter part either LOL.

                    Jim, looks like some great progress! I used to love the heat but have also noted that in the last few years I wear down very quickly in the heat.
                    Rolf
                    RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                    Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                    Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                    And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Up here, some building materials have been subject to extreme price increases and chronic shortages. Are you seeing similar conditions there?
                      Hi Bill - I'm not really sure how to compare prices here in Mexico to those in the US. What I have definitely seen is an increase in the price of steel from when I last bought some here about a year ago. Also the construction plywood I bought for the roof not only was in short supply from the regular suppliers I would normally use but seemed to be around 20% more expensive over the same time period from the supplier I eventually sourced it from.

                      In general locally fabricated materials seem to have increased in price around 10 - 15% over the past year but anything imported has substantially increased in the same time period due I imagine to the devaluation of the peso against the dollar.

                      Having said this what I have found is that prices of the same or similar materials from different outlets varies tremendously and it pays to shop around. For example, a bag of basecoat for covering Durock panels costs approx. 25 USD at a location a couple of streets from my home yet costs closer to 17 USD at another similar sized location across town. I also just priced up 8" square glass vidroblocks which at Home Depot cost 3.70 USD yet at a large store specializing in tiles and bathrooms accessories exactly the same blocks cost 2:60 USD each.

                      At the end of the day, if you want a job doing you have to pay the price. The only caveat I'll add to this - blowing my own trumpet a little - is that I have enough imagination coupled with a lot of practical common sense knowledge to often come up with lower cost alternatives to get to the same end point. Maybe I have also gotten a little smarter with age, but I still make stupid mistakes - LOL!

                      Excellent writing. Made me smile and chuckle several times.
                      Hi Jo - thanks for the nice comment.
                      If I can make folks smile a little whilst reading my 'War and Peace' lengthy posts then I'm happy
                      Last edited by jim_mex; 03-12-2021, 09:44 AM.
                      Jim in Mexico

                      Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                      - Albert Einstein

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the reply Jim. I've heard people speak of up to 30% - 40% increases in the price some building materials, both locally and in other parts of the US. I was just curious if that same phenomena was playing out in other countries. I presumed it would, at least to a degree, but there has definitely been a greater demand for such materials, for several reasons, such as the various economic stimulus packages our Government has funded. Like a lot of other durable goods, this increased demand, coupled with pandemic related supply stream interruptions has really made the problem quite acute in some places.
                        Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter. Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Update at 17 March

                          These last few days I seem to have got distracted by too many other issues to make much progress but there is some movement to report.

                          Firstly, despite the weather continuing to be cloudless and hot, last Sunday night around 6 pm the weather changed abruptly and thunderclouds rolled in and about 40 mins later we had 15 mins of hard rain, the first since the second week of January. The good news was that my new roof was leak free. The bad news was as I walked into the doorway of my existing shop I noticed a couple of water drips at the beginning of its galvanized sheet steel rainwater gutter which runs along the length of our boundary wall. As I was poking around with my finger to try to locate where the water drops were coming from I poked through a patch of oxidized gutter and the water from the rainstorm flooded out like a pipe burst. Fortunately, instead of running into my shop the water ran out of the door onto the lower floor of my extension area. No damage was done as I’d lifted everything perishable off of the floor just in case we had a deluge.

                          The following day I pop-riveted a sheet metal and silicone caulking patch over the corroded area which, after another evening rainstorm last night, has held
                          up but now I have to think about replacing the whole of the old guttering. Sometimes you get the feeling that for every 3 steps forward you take a couple of steps back! I guess I should be pleased that I found this problem sooner rather than later and since the guttering as lasted almost 20 years its a fair comment that its paid its dues.

                          So,
                          since my last post I’ve installed one of the two glass block panels I planned for the garden facing wall of my new shop.

                          I decided to use glass blocks a) for security, b) to help minimize noise transmission when I’m working inside the shop, and,
                          importantly, c) to prevent Murphy’s Law from having me swing a length of board I’m working on at the workbench through a conventional glass window! Cost wise these glass block panels come in at around 30% of the price of two conventional aluminum framed windows of similar size which is a nice saving.

                          The installation of the glass block panels wasn’t without a challenge. Although there are a number of localities selling these blocks around town none sold the plastic spacers and the metal armatures used to facilitate the installation. I ended up having to make a load of spacers out of some scrap pieces of laminate floor board
                          ing and used some lengths of ‘soft’ ¼” diam. construction wire to run vertical and horizontally through the block grout joints, dowelling their ends into the surrounding metal frame to secure the glass panel in place. Using this wire – called alambron here in Mexico – was also a challenge as it is sold by weight and comes as a 4 ft diam. coil and has to be straightened out. Not too difficult a task but time consuming.

                          So, given all the correct spacers and armatures a panel should have taken me half a day to install. My McGiver workarounds ended up dragging this task out to 2 half days and I still have the second panel to install!

                          Next task before I complete the second part of the garden facing wall will be to cast a doorstep and tidy up the door surround by applying Durock paneling to the surrounding frame work so that I can have an installer then come in and fit a door.

                          For those of you who might wonder why I don’t complete the other part of the wall before working on the door and surround the answer is that I rarely work in a conventional manner - even when I am scrolling! I like to see how part of the work will look when it is finished before continuing with the remainder of the work. Then, if I screw up or something is not to my liking I can make adjustments before going further. I call this my ‘fluid approach’ to projects! Other folks might call this a crazy way to work – LOL!

                          So,
                          this is where I’m at and it’s a case of keep plodding on with the philosophy that slow and steady will win this race.

                          Another apology for my photos. As usual I’m working in a very cramped area constantly freeing up areas of work by moving my equipment around and to take the photos I used a wide angle lens which caused a fair amount of distortion. Rest assured the verticals of the door frame which looked curved are in fact straight and dead vertical. Either that or my spirit level is curved!

                          Btw - its 6 pm and yet again after a hot cloudless day there are thunderclouds heading our way. One nice thing about our weather is when there are thunderstorms around they are very predictable and almost always occur in early evening which frees up the day to work - except when I clash with the noise abatement society!

                          More to come...

                          extn window1-3.jpg

                          extn window2-2.jpg



                          Last edited by jim_mex; 03-18-2021, 07:21 AM.
                          Jim in Mexico

                          Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                          - Albert Einstein

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I trust Norma is chair of the noise abatement committee?
                            Jim
                            When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
                            Too early to leave, too late to call in.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              She certainly is Jim and as she gave her permission for this extension to be made I have no intention of upsetting her - yet!
                              Jim in Mexico

                              Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
                              - Albert Einstein

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • will8989
                                Reply to EX dust collection holes screwed up a project.!
                                by will8989
                                Carole, only you would cut sprinkles on a scrollsaw. I would probably use rice and stain it. I just gave up replacing my insert. Its worn, but works for what I need. I do sand it to make sure there are no burrs sticking up to scratch the wood. I will be trying the new contact paper when mine runs...
                                Yesterday, 08:16 PM
                              • will8989
                                Reply to Shawl pins
                                by will8989
                                Thick hair would need a larger opening, thinner hair would require a smaller opening to stay in place. The one being shown in the utube would probably work for thicker hair. They look way better than a pencil or dowel! That elephant sure is cute in her hair!.
                                Yesterday, 08:09 PM
                              • Rolf
                                New Toy!
                                by Rolf
                                A family friends father passed away and he was an avid bird carver. So my nephew is helping the family sell some of his tools. I bought this air cleaner and will b uy most of his carving knives and burrs. And no that is not my workshop! Not even close. ...
                                Yesterday, 04:47 PM
                              • Rolf
                                Reply to EX dust collection holes screwed up a project.!
                                by Rolf
                                I just did a quick job on my table. Charles Hand has noticed that the adhesive on the new rolls of Contact brand shelf paper leaves a residue. He has changed to The duck brand. I just bought a roll and covered my table with it. It is a tough slick surface. It will be interesting to see how it holds...
                                Yesterday, 04:44 PM
                              • axor
                                Reply to Shawl pins
                                by axor

                                Yes, they can be used for hair. If they are made a little larger than the original, the shawl pins will work great in the hair!...
                                Yesterday, 03:21 PM
                              Working...
                              X