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    Hi all - our recent home remodeling project has involved me getting back into my workshed after a lengthy absence to do some work to 'assist' the workmen on the job plus I now have a string of home furniture projects to look at now we have moved back into our home.

    I decided this work could be better accomplished if I invested in a couple of power tools I've been mulling over buying for a while.

    About 3 weeks back I bought a Dewalt DCS356 Multi Tool (oscillating tool) along with a bunch of different types of blades. This is already becoming one of the most useful tools in my collection and amongst other uses I'm finding it especially great for cutting into those areas where conventional tools just won't go.

    Following this purchase I'm about to receive a replacement welder for my aging stick welder. I've splashed out on an entry level Forney Easy Weld 140 MP which will allow me to undertake MIG, gas shielded or flux core wire welding and/or conventional stick welding. This unit is going to find use in assisting me to build some modern furniture combining metalwork with natural wood. My first project is a 6 - 8 seater dining room table with an oak slab top and metal frame legs. I'm very eager to get this unit and find out how it will improve on my welding skills

    Its been 8 months now since I retired and I seem to be working almost as much as I was in my past full time job but the good news is that I'm having a ball.

    My biggest challenge now is to convince Norma to let me extend my cramped workshop another 6 feet into our back garden to give me a little more space to 'play' with my tools.

    Wish me luck!
    Last edited by jim_mex; 10-24-2020, 04:24 PM.
    Jim in Mexico

    Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
    - Albert Einstein

  • #2
    Good luck getting ANY of that garden space!
    Jim
    When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
    Too early to leave, too late to call in.

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    • #3
      You have found out about retirement. Busy, busy and busy. And you need more tools!

      Comment


      • #4
        Jim I bought a mig welder the last time I did a frame off restoration on my TVR. I had a few frame cracks. I bought one that used shielding gas. I never really mastered the power vs feed vs moving the torch. Using it only a couple of times a year did not help.
        My dream was to buy a TIG so that I could also weld aluminum. Which I did in 2018 and also took a tig welding class at the local adult education facility. Love it.

        But I see these guys who MIG weld regularly lay down these beautiful beads and clean welds that rival the TIG welds. So practice is a must.
        Rolf
        RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
        Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
        Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
        And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

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        • #5
          Hi Rolf - the unit I bought will also do Tig welding once you buy the optional accessories - torch, nozzles etc: - plus it will do conventional stick welding too. I doubt I'll be heading down the TIG route anytime soon, at least not for the projects I have in mind at the moment.

          I did a fair amount of research before settling on the Forney unit. Despite being very economical compared to established brands like Lincoln and Everlast it has some good reviews and asa multi purpose unit it should cover all of my needs.

          I'll likely start off with flux core wire non-gas welding since I don't have to invest in a gas bottle and regulator plus most of my welding has to be outdoors, often in windy conditions, which always doesn't suit gas shielded welding. I'm not too bad at stick welding but have a tendency to burn through thinner stock metal and I'm hoping that wire flux core welding will help me here along with the ability to better control the voltage which my existing stick welder plant is shaky on.

          I agree with you 100% that practice is a must plus I've also found that at least on thicker material if you can lay down a good weld bead an angle grinder to clean up splatter is your best friend.

          For the past couple of days I've been hitting Youtube videos to glean as much information as I can on MIG welding and there is a wealth of info out there to help folks who want to give welding ago. Much better than my first welding experience about 40 years back when I asked a local welder in the factory I worked at if he would help me build a car trailer to carry a large camping tent I had at the time. I remember vividly that he showed me the basics of how to weld a bead on some 1 1/2 in x 1/8 in angle iron and then passed me the torch and a bunch of sticks and told be to get on with the work. The trailer couldn't have been that bad because after I used it or about 3 years it was passed on to my brother when I moved to Mexico and he then used it for about 10 years on a daily basis for his work as an odd-jobbing DIY guy.

          Since then I've done a fair amount of simple structural welding using angle iron and PTR to build workbench frames, tables and even the roof framework of my workshed and although sometimes my welds don't look pretty they have almost all ended up being functional and have stood the test of time which is what matters most to me.

          Btw - the first task I have to try this welder out on is to build a paddock stand to lit up the back end of my bike so that I can easily grease the chain and also carry out simple maintenence work such as tyre changes or balancing as required. Once again Youtube DIY videos are helping me out here -

          I'll update on my experiences once I give the unit a go.

          Cheers!

          .
          Jim in Mexico

          Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
          - Albert Einstein

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          • #6
            Did you ever get the centre stand for the bike? A paddock stand does the same thing finally, I guess.

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            • #7
              Hi Rhys - I did finally get the center stand for the bike a couple of weeks back after it was stuck in customs for almost a month. Still have to put it on. The paddock stand will help me do this - Lol!

              Of course you are correct in that the center stand does a similar job but the advantage with the paddock stand is that it will lift the back wheel a couple of inches higher off of the ground so that this old guy doesn't have to bend down so much!
              Jim in Mexico

              Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
              - Albert Einstein

              Comment


              • #8
                You tube is a real blessing when it comes to learning new stuff. I have watched one that compared the flux core and gas mig weld. If I remember correctly polarity comes into play. The flux core weld was really nice. Have fun.
                I was told by the cardiologist that I am not allowed to weld because of the Pacemaker, but I did some research and they say nothing over 180 amps. I have not gone much over 80, mostly less, so I should be OK.
                Rolf
                RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
                Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
                Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
                And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

                Comment


                • #9
                  New tools can definitely open up the scope of what we can do, or how well I'm on the band wagon. Congrats!
                  Linda at www.ArtIngrained.com

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                  • #10
                    I have an implanted spinal cord stimulator to help with back pain. They also have warnings about welding. I could not get one when I was working in an electric furnace steelmaking shop as the electrodes were over 1000 amps and volts. I have also decided to stay away from welding as I just do not like the risks.

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