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Wallplanter revisited

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  • Wallplanter revisited

    Hi Folks - with lots of posts around regarding the COVID-19 situation I thought I'd post a non pandemic topic to hopefully brighten up the day a little.


    Back in January I posted a whimsical gardening post showing a wall planter I knocked up out of PVC plumbing fittings. This morning I was giving the plants some water and took some up-to-date photos to show you folks how this planter is progressing. There was one fatality when the original plant in the second holder down on the right didn't take so I replaced it at the weekend. Apart from this all the other plants are doing extremely well and I'm pleased with how this idea is turning out.

    I don't know the names of any of these plants, maybe some of you gardening experts may be able to help me out particularly for the ones in the photos below.

    I only have one concern with this planter. Norma has a terracotta planter on the floor underneath the wall planter and she must have thrown some homemade compost into the soil which included some tomato skins because she now has 2 cherry tomato plants with fruit vigorously encroaching on the base of the planter and threatening to overrun it! I can see that I am either going to have to find a way to string up these plants either side of the wall planter or undertake some judicious pruning when Norma isn't looking!

    For reference here is how the original planter looked....

    wallplanter original.jpg​​

    Here it is how it looks today along with some of the plants....

    Enjoy!

    planter april 2020.jpgplant01.jpg

    plant03.jpgplant02.jpg

    plant04.jpg


    Btw - I took these photos on a Pixel 3A XL phone I purchased last week and I am really pleased with the quality of the camera.
    Last edited by jim_mex; 04-06-2020, 02:52 PM.
    Jim in Mexico

    Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
    - Albert Einstein

  • #2
    The planter really does look great Jim. As for the tomato plants, a late night expedition with a jug of boiling water will leave no trace in the morning .... not that I would do such a thing.

    Comment


    • jim_mex
      jim_mex commented
      Editing a comment
      Rhys - you have an evil streak which is totally unbecoming of you! This must be why I am still laughing after reading your comment. -

  • #3
    Hi Jim. Those are beautiful plants. No idea of kind,but bueatiful.
    Denny
    ArtCrafters in Dayton, TN

    Comment


    • #4
      jim_mex commented
      Today, 02:09 AM
      Rhys - you have an evil streak which is totally unbecoming of you! This must be why I am still laughing after reading your comment. -

      Jim, in the late 50s I sang in a choir at church and the guy I normally sat with was a lawyer in town, and it was he who gave me the information on hot water trick. I understand he had problems with the neighbours planting on his boundary .... I could not possibly comment.

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      • #5
        Hey, someday you will want tomatoes. Just let them grow.
        Jim
        When looking at the clock at work--the correct time is:
        Too early to leave, too late to call in.

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        • #6
          Here is my gardening diary: At age 6, yes I can remember, I would visit my Mom's family for the summer and helped in the garden. Mostly tried not to eat all the stringbeans I picked. By age 9 during the summer I was incharge of the cucumber cleaning, getting those spindly things off, to make pickles, tomatoes for sauce, string beans - still ate them fresh picked - heard a canner blow up when they tried to open it too soon and those darn string beans all over the place. Worked in the garden every summer until I moved back down to MD when I got married. Got Bruce involved in it. Picked corn in flannel shirts in the hot summer to keep from getting cut, hoed so many rows of vegetables, probably 100s of miles. Did canning with Bruce. Went shopping on my shelves in the basement all winter long. Along the way I planted 40, yes 40 rose bushes on our lawn. People would stop by just to admire them. Sold at the farmers market with my aunt, grew flowers, rototilled acres of mums that we dug up and sold. As my relatives aged they slowed down farming and so did I. Thankfully. Now my farming consists of calling Joselynn at the organic farm she is starting with her husband, putting in my order, giving card number and picking up at the farmers market I sell my crafts at. Everything else I can I buy at the market. Farming is not for the weak or lazy!!! I only grow mint and a few other spices. And everytime I snap a string bean I hear my sweet grandmother saying "Betty Ann!! They are for dinner now stop eating them." Which I never did. Memories. And that was the family farm that was just sold.
          Betty

          "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

          Comment


          • #7
            Hi Betty - I was an avid gardener when I was in the UK just over 30 years ago. Apart from the traditional front and back gardens at my home - front for flowers and a lawn, back for vegetables and fruits - I rented a parcel of land called an allotment from the local council where I could wind down at the weekends and on summer evenings, get some exercise and forget about the pressures of work whilst growing and harvesting fruits and vegetables around the year. This always gave me great satisfaction despite the often hard work involved. It was also a social activity because my allotment was one of approx 60 such parcels of land together in one designated area and it was common at the end of a work session to sit around with other gardeners to have a chat and a beer as well as pick up many gardening tips.

            Where I now live in Mexico I have a very small garden with some grass for the dogs to run on and periodically destroy, a few bushes and most importantly two well established lime trees which give us fresh limes all the year around.

            Hopefully once Norma retires in around 4 years time we will move from this home and look for a place with more space around it to have a small garden to grow salad vegetables, tomatoes, peppers and the like and of course herbs . This is a challenge where we live because our climate is very dry for most of the year and since we live at 8,000 ft above sea level the nights can drop very cold in winter. Having said this I already have plans for some raised beds with integrated drip feed watering systems and overhead screening protection from the harsh sun as well as from the cold nights.

            There are many satisfying things in life but being able to get pleasure out of gardening and enjoy the fruits of your labor is up there with the best.

            Cheers
            Jim
            Last edited by jim_mex; 04-09-2020, 10:15 AM.
            Jim in Mexico

            Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.
            - Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #8
              Jim, I love gardening - admiring other gardens! Seriously, I would probably try container gardens but we have a very active ground hog that loves everything I plant. I do some herbs and that’s all. There’s a young couple getting started in farming and I would rather buy from them and the other farmers at the market and spend my time doing something else. Some grandkids come to mind. Happy gardening!
              Betty

              "Congress needs to realize it is a government of the people, by the people and for the people. Not of the people, by the people and for Congress." - Dr. Benjamin Carson, Pediatric Neurosurgeon, Johns Hopkins Hospital

              Comment

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