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  • #46
    http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/AlbumList?u=4055528

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    • #47
      Re: Sharpening

      Using wet/dry sandpaper is the only way i sharpen my tools.. I glue the sandpaper to pieces of Ceramic bathroom tile that i got at our local home improvement store for 50 cents. I keep tiles with sand paper with a range of grits from 400 grit to 2000 grit.. the last thing i do after carving is to give the knife a strop or two on the 2000 grit so the knife will be ready for the next carving session !!

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      • #48
        Re: Sharpening

        I have heard of using sandpaper but never tried it myself. From these posts, I think I am going to give it a try.

        Do you put anything on the sandpaper (oil, water.. etc.) before you use it?

        Sharpening is my least favorite part of carving so anything that will help I will give it a try.

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        • #49
          Re: Sharpening

          I just sharpen my tools dry. Some folks like to use oil, kerosene or water... dry works for me, I can just change sandpaper if it gets worn out.

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          • #50
            Re: Sharpening

            This has been a very interesting thread, I noticed that a lot of you use sandpaper or a stone each time before or after you carve, I'm not an expert mind you, but I think you are prematurely wearing out your blade. I have always understood that you only strop, until you ding or damage the blade...if I'm wrong, please enlighten me..also someone mentioned a pocketknife for carving on trips etc...What I have found is that unless you are will to spend $$$ most pocketknives are stainless and it is soft, you will not get the edge you will on a good carving knife...I would love to have a good folding carving knife myself, but wow are they expensive...IMHO

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            • #51
              Re: Sharpening

              Hey! It let me log in! Amazing! Anyway, stropping has two functions. One is to straighten out the blade edge. The edge, being thin, will bend and leave those white lines. If it were a nick, stropping would not make it go away because stopping removes VERY little metal. Ever see a professional Chef sharpen a carving knife on that long thin metal rod? He is taking the ripples out of the edge, not removing metal. The other function is to polish out scratches. Scratches cause the blade to drag and tear through the wood. A mirror polish on the edge glides smoothly through the wood. Most expert carvers recommend regular stropping, as often as every 10 minutes to as seldom as just before you start back to work. It is obvious from the wide variety of things used to strop with that the function of straightening the blade can be accomplished on darned near anything. Anyone try using a chunk of flat hardwood? Do what ever works for you but DO IT! Personally, 2000 grit sandpaper sounds a lot like a dab of Silicon Carbide on the back of a scrap of hard leather.

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              • #52
                Re: Sharpening

                Regarding that pocket knife; if you look in most any good hardware store, you can find a 'whittler's' knife for between 25 and 35 bucks, by Case or another mfg. If you check with your local Boy Scout Supply station, they sell a darn good one for under 25 bucks. It is not stainless, but a fine grade tool steel that holds an edge really well. There are three blades, a 2 1/2 inch, a 1 1/4 inch and what they call a saber blade. I've had several and have been extremely pleased with them. You can get similar knives priced up near 80 bucks from the specialty shops, but these Case and Uncle Henry's are every bit as good.

                Al

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                • #53
                  Re: Sharpening

                  First of all, my thanks to who ever got the board fixed ! I can log in again!

                  Regarding pocket knives, it's a personal thing but I just cannot carve much of anything with a pocket knife. Most handles are too small and angular to use for very long without hurting my hands. Second, as has been mentioned, most pocket knives are stainless. Stainless just doesn't make for a good cutting edge. Carbon steel is much better but if you carry it in your pocket, you find it gets rusty. We have a carver in our club who uses ONLY pocket knives and does great work with them but I will stick to large-handled, small, thin-bladed carving knives, thanks.

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                  • #54
                    Re: Sharpening

                    I posted a picture of the Camilus whittling knife, if anyone was wondering what they were. also there is a rule and standard bench knife for size comparison. I wouldn't say this is a great knife, but for around 25 bucks ya can stick it in your pocket and carry it wherever ya want to go. It's light and has the three very functional carving blades.

                    Al

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