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Maple and Walnut Table

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  • Maple and Walnut Table

    Here are some pictures of my latest project. The only scrolling I did on this project was cutting the plugs and the feet. The dimensions are 25.5" x 25.5" x ≈ 38", depending on how high the feet are raised. I used linseed oil and wax for the finish. I wanted to put leveling feet on it but after pricing them and seeing what they looked like, I decided to have a go at making my own. I will take some "build along" pictures later to explain how I made them.

    All comments are welcome.
    Attached Files
    John

    I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations. James Madison

  • #2
    Like the feet. Am interested in a "how to".

    Larry

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    • #3
      Very, very nice table! And THANKS for inventing the wood levelers - what a good idea, and I'm looking forward to your post (and photos) of how you did it. Clever person!

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      • #4
        Okay, here we go.

        1: Select your wood. I am using walnut and soft maple for this example.

        2: Determine the thickness of the bolt head. We will need to cut the wood thicker then the bolt head if we want it to be a leveling foot so that there is clearance for the head to wobble around.

        3: Make sure that the table saw will be cutting thicker then the head. Remember, "Measure twice, cut once."

        4: The wood, now cut to size. Okay, over to the workbench.

        5: Mark the piece of wood that you will be using for the middle. I am going to make it 1.5" in diameter.

        6: Now find the center and mark it to help find where to position the bolt head. Picture no.6 is the layout before the cut. Cut the bolt head shape out of you middle piece leaving a little extra space on all sides. Without this space we will have no room for the bolt to adjust to the floor and no leveling feet. It is also important not cut too far outside the line. If you do so the head inside will just spin freely instead of screwing into the leg your project.

        7: Glueing up the middle piece (walnut) with one of the ends.

        8: Glued up. You should be able to see, inside of the cutout, three lines roughly determining the center of the cutout. Use a bit larger then the shaft of your bolt but not so large that the head can come through the hole, to drill at this center point.

        9: Cut out.

        10: With the bolt in place, glue the remaining piece of wood onto the stack. Let it dry.

        11: Cut out the remaining circle on your scroll saw. The closer you cut to the original stack the less sanding you will have to do on the drill press.

        12: Chuck it up and start sanding. I use 60 grit sandpaper to do the rough shaping. After that I progress up to 220 grit sandpaper while on the drill press for a very smooth surface.

        13: Sanded to 220 grit. Looks pretty good.

        14 & 15 show how much the bolt can adjust to uneven flooring. I would imagine that you could take this quite a bit further, but as of yet I have not needed to.

        After this finish with whatever you are comfortable with. If the feet are going to be moved a lot, I recommend using something tough.
        Attached Files
        John

        I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations. James Madison

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        • #5
          Great stuff, the feet look good. I would put a stick on felt pad under them to protect the beautiful wood and your floor. The felt can be peeled off and replaced when worn.

          The table looks great also.

          What did you do on the leg end? T-nuts?
          Rolf
          RBI G4 26 Hawk, EX 16 with Pegas clamps, Nova 1624 DVR XP
          Philosophy "I don't know that I can't, therefore I can"
          Proud Member of the Long Island Woodworkers Club
          And the Long Island Scrollsaw Association

          Comment


          • #6
            Nope, I just drilled a hole and threaded the bolt right onto it. I had to use a wrench the first time down but now I can tighten it with just finger pressure (though it's not very easy). It has shown no inclination to loosen of its own accord and believe me, I have tested it by pushing, pulling, and clamping. It is plenty tough. Whenever I want to change the hight I just tip the table slightly to one side and twist the foot. It works great.
            John

            I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations. James Madison

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