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Consider Your trucks to be B-I-G,- have a look at these Aussie, " Tonka-Toys!! "

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  • Consider Your trucks to be B-I-G,- have a look at these Aussie, " Tonka-Toys!! "

    Hi everyone, Some time ago I mentioned an unique Aussie Road Transport Icon, called a, " Road-Train, " but didn't have much luck at the time finding a good site showing heaps of photos. Today, while searching for something else, came across this collection of, " Aussie Tonka-Toys." The average trailer is about 40ft. - 50 ft in length, then there's the 18ft. "A" frame coupling Dolly, between each trailer, plus the " Bit at the front end, " The average is Three trailers in length,- some are up to,
    ( Don't faint with shock !! ),- SIX trailers in length, and carrying, " only, " 400 tons !!! Can you imagine a, " monster," of THAT size on USA Highways ??

    Link;- Google, " Road Trains Photos. " then click on, " Images for Road Trains Photos. " then sit back and enjoy viewing a few hundred Photos of our unique Aussie Road Transport Icon.

    Mate of mine, next town up from Port Vincent, owns one,- only three trailers, plus the Rig at the front end,-His is a, " Baby,- only measures 150 ft. from nose to tail !! " ( Only ?? )

  • #2
    Wow Roger, now that's what I call a rig. Imagine making a wrong turn and having to turn it around. I'd just leave it where it was and hitch a ride home -Lol. Thanks for the link.
    Mick
    I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught. Winston Churchill

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    • #3
      Aussie, " Tonka-Toys, "

      Believe it or not these, Aussie, " monsters," are relatively easy-to-reverse. Simply get everything in a STRAIGHT LINE, lock each turntable, and S-L-O-W-L-Y back up. I saw one guy reverse his Rig a good 100 yards on a dirt track, back onto the main highway, without any problems whatsoever. According to various drivers, I have spoken to, it comes down to practice. ( like everything else !! )
      The Diesel engines are usually Cummins, or Cats, up to 625 bhp ( brake horsepower ), coupled to 16 sp. transmissions, & bogie rear-axle drive. The prime-movers, ( tractor units ) are usually built to the buyer's specifications, as different working areas require differing working specifications ( i.e. Constant highway driving is totally different to driving on rough dirt tracks, & crossing creek beds, etc. )
      There's usually four x 200 gallon Diesel tanks, ( two to a side ), slung on the main frame, under the Cab, & Sleeper unit. Tyres,( tires ), cost about $1,000 each. There's a dozen on the Prime-Mover ( tractor unit ), plus another dozen on each trailer, plus two spares per trailer, plus another eight per Dolly. You can figure out how many wheels, & tyres,( tires ), to a Road-Train !!
      ** IF you wish to buy one, trailers and all,- it will, " ONLY," set you back about US$500,000.00 ( Half Million US$ ). Most Truckies simply Lease the, " little darlings," as it works out more cost effective than actually owning one !!!!

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      • #4
        Hey, Roer, have you checked out aschisworkshop.com ? Thet have wood plans for quite a few Aussie trucks/trailers. Be a cool project1

        Paul
        www.flicker.com/photos/woodworks44224

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        • #5
          Aschisworkshop truck plans

          Hi Paul44224. ( and everyone else ) Yes, well aware of Aschisworkshop.com We sometimes swap plans and ideas for suitable Wooden Toy-making subjects !!!

          The only real BIG Aussie Road-Train on Aschis' site that is accurate in dimensions is his, West Australian Iron-Ore Carrier. Yes, I know he has an Aussie B-Double plan too,- but that is not a genuine Road-Train. Many of his trucks, ( and please don't get me wrong ), are actually European, or USA Trucks and Trailers, which Aschi finds more interesting to design as Toy Plans. Most Australian Semi-trailers today ALL have three rear Axles, ( called, " tri-axle trailers, " ) something to do with weight distribution, and better road-handling capabilities than the USA / European twin-axle trailers. Apart from that, Aschi does an excellent job with designing his plans, as I have several here.
          ** Another friend of mine recently designed a prototype Low-Loader, ( Low-Boy Trailer ),- based on an Aussie 140 tonner, with widening sides,- the real one measures a good 60 ft. from end to end, plus front Dolly, then the prime-mover at the front of the Dolly. It is set to, 1:20 scale for realism, and I now have the prototype here as I now have the, " interesting headache," of designing an Actual Size workable Toy Plan off the prototype, as the Low-Loader Model-Toy prototype is a good 30 inches in length, without the Dolly !!!

          ** Am adding a couple of the Model-Toy Trucks I design, & make. The cab-over with the standard trailer, is available as a Toy Plan, along with the low-loader, & tractor for a load; - PM me IF interested in making something a bit different.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Wow! That is some excellant work, Roger! Beyond my capabilities/equipment! Must be a real challenge to design and build!

            Paul
            www.flicker.com/photos/woodworks44224

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            • #7
              Hi Paul44224. Thank you for the compliment.
              Actually the Trucks I design and make are NOT all that hard to make,- anyone with a Scroll Saw, combo belt/disc sander, and a standard pedestall drill, plus a workshop circular saw can make them, especially when they buy the Plan/s from me !!
              Otherwise, it's simply using a bit of creative imagination, and photos from a Trucking Magazine,- and if one is luck enough to score a Truck Manufacturer's specification brochure, then it's even easier ! If one can use a CAD program it does help, but IF one don't have CAD on their computer, ( like me ), all you need is heaps of creative imagination, modifying the project to suit the general truck shape. Cab-overs are real easy being a basic," box shape," to begin with, but any truck that has reasonably flat panels can be successfully made in wood.
              I don't use CAD programs as, ( believe it or not ), I find CAD to be totally boring, compared to me enjoying myself with pencil, rubber, & ruler, seated at my large table with some sheets of A3 size paper, and a Trucking Magazine with heaps of nice Truck pictures in it. Yes, I know I am most probably considered to be, " old fashioned, & out of date, " when it comes to hi-tec computer programs,- but I actually do enjoy designing things the old way,- by hand on the table!!!!!

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