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Can you use an iron to transfer toner?

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  • Can you use an iron to transfer toner?

    Scrollers,
    I've transferred an image from a laser copy before by using a woodburning tool to heat up the toner and transfer it to the wood, but this was limited to a very small image (managable with a woodburner). I'm working on a project now that I would like to print a picture onto the wood that would be too large to use the woodburner. I was thinking of using a clothes iron to give me a larger surface to transfer the heat with. Anyone have an idea how hot I would set the iron at to do this? Any experience out there that could share technique?
    Bruce
    . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
    visit sometime
    Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

  • #2
    I've always heard that you should not use a LASER printer but an INK JET printer and
    you can also use LASER SHEETS in your INK JET PRINTER as per the instructions that follow:
    Print your line art in an INK JET printer, NOT a LASER printer.
    Print on clear plastic, buy sheets for Overhead Projectors at any office supply store.

    Here is the secret - buy sheets for LASER printers.
    Why would you put laser sheets through your ink jet printer?
    The ink does not dry.
    This is the ink you are going to be pressing onto your wood.
    If you look closely at the plastic sheet when it comes out of the printer you will see the small droplets of ink sitting on the surface.

    4. Have your wood dust free and ready.
    Carefully take your plastic sheet from your printer and slowly place it on your wood.
    You have quite a few minutes to do this, the water based ink does not dry very fast.

    Turn your printed plastic sheet wet side down, if you have lettering you will see why we flipped the letters earlier.
    Take your time to line it up before you touch it to the wood.
    Pin it down with a couple of your fingers.
    Do not let it move.
    Simply rub the plastic with your finger or a soft cloth.
    The wet ink will transfer right onto your wood.

    Good luck and God Bless! Spirithorse

    Comment


    • #3
      Laser printing on wood veneer? [Archive] - BT3Central Forums

      The link above has a nice discussion about this very point and NOTE in particular the last answer in the discussion ~ a scroll sawyer wrote in and said something to the effect of "I don't know about you guy but here's what I've been doing . . . . ."

      John
      I've Got A Lot More To Learn
      About Leaving Battlegrounds Alone
      "~~ Molly Venter

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a pattern transfer tool that can be used with photocopy or laser printers it wont work with ink jet since it is not tone base. I would think an iron would work. One think to remember if you have say words or pictures you need to print you pattern in mirror image or it will come out backward. I ahve not used my transfer tool yet I got it for chip carving which I have not started yet. I hope this helps.
        sigpic: Dan US Navy PR1 (Ret)
        To all who serve or have served, Thank you
        Well I am the worlds greatest scroller at my house.

        Comment


        • #5
          Normal toner is set with heat, and will transfer with heat. I would imagine if you could get the heat high enough, you should be able to transfer the laser image to your wood blank with an iron. I would sand the blank first and make sure to remove all dust.

          It should be easy enough to experiment with. If it doesn't work as expected you can always re-sand the blank. Let us know how it turns out.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's tough to get a regular iron hot enough, especially if the copy isn't fresh enough. There's a new soldering iron-type woodburner by Walnut Hollow that's coming out soon (we got a preview model) that has a round disc tip designed to use to transfer laser patterns.

            I've had better luck using lacquer thinner or acetone. Put the pattern face down and apply the solvent to the back of the paper (make sure it's standard paper and not cardstock or heavy-weight paper).

            Best Regards,
            Bob Duncan
            Technical Editor
            www.GrobetUSA.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanx all for your responses.

              Spirithorse, I would be very concerned about getting a picture off the printer without it smearing coming out. I remember using the wrong paper (laser instead of ink jet) once and some of the print was smeared exiting the printer. Additionally, I'd worry about the quality of the transfer since this would have a fairly detailed picture.

              Bob, the round disc tip sounds similar to what I used with the woodburner (it has interchangable tips for different applications). I don't know how large a disk the Walnut Hollow model has, but the woodburner disk-tip I used was small enough to make it a chore to transfer an image ~ 6" square. I'm intrigued by the lacquer thinner idea. How would you apply it; Brush it on? Spray it? Sponge it? How well does the toner adhere to the wood?

              I actually have a friend that has a printer that can print on to wood, but I am looking for a way John Q. Scroller can do this if they like the project.
              Bruce
              . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
              visit sometime
              Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

              Comment


              • #8
                If you're trying to do more than just transfer a cutting pattern, something you might try is a t-shirt transfer. It leaves material behind, but it might just be the thing you're looking for.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BobD View Post
                  I've had better luck using lacquer thinner or acetone. Put the pattern face down and apply the solvent to the back of the paper (make sure it's standard paper and not cardstock or heavy-weight paper).
                  Does anyone have any experience with this? Any ideas how you would you apply it (brush, spray, sponge) and how heavy an application? How well does the toner adhere to the wood?
                  Bruce
                  . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                  visit sometime
                  Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I really soak the paper with it. I've used a brush in the past, but I've also poured the solvent right onto the paper and spread it with a rag. It's at least as permanent as when I've used the heat transfer tool to transfer the image.

                    As for T-shirt transfers...well...I've not had much luck with them. I struggle to get the whole image transferred to wood. They're hard enough to use on T-shirts.

                    Bob
                    www.GrobetUSA.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanx Bob. I'll try to practice with it over the weekend and see how it comes out for me.
                      Bruce
                      . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                      visit sometime
                      Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, I had a chance to play a little over the weekend. Much to my dismay, nothing seemed to work as well as I had hoped ...

                        It's tough to get a regular iron hot enough, especially if the copy isn't fresh enough.
                        I tried to iron the picture on, but Bob was right ... I had it set as high as it would go and I scorched the paper before it transfered enough of the toner to give me a clear image.

                        I've had better luck using lacquer thinner or acetone.
                        I tried using lacquer thinner, flooded the paper, and got no toner transfer at all. Don't know what I did (or didn't) do, but nothing ended up on the wood.

                        Print your line art in an INK JET printer, NOT a LASER printer.
                        This gave me the most image transfer, but it still wasn't acceptable.

                        There's a new soldering iron-type woodburner by Walnut Hollow that's coming out soon (we got a preview model) that has a round disc tip designed to use to transfer laser patterns.
                        This sounds similar to one that I have at home. It may be tedious for the size of the picture, but it's my last hope. I'll let you know how that comes out when I get a chance to try it.

                        In the meantime, if anyone can explain the failures, or have other ideas, please chime in.
                        Bruce
                        . . . because each piece will be someone's heirloom someday.
                        visit sometime
                        Hawk 220VS, Delta 40-570

                        Comment

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