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  • Puffballs

    Our dog (Barney) took my wife and I for a walk last night and we found these behind a church near our house. There were 4 of them.
    Have any of you eaten puffballs?

    Bob
    Attached Files
    Delta P-20 & Q-3

    I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

  • #2
    Around here they are called the devils snuff - when they are fully mature they puff out what looks like snuff- I love to step on them but I don't think they would be safe to eat.
    Sharon

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    • #3
      Hmmmmm never seen those befor. is it a form of musroom?? just wondering.

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      • #4
        Sharon, I use to work with a guy that loved them. He would eat them raw at work. I guess he still alive.
        I have never eaten them.

        Bob
        Delta P-20 & Q-3

        I wondered why the baseball was getting bigger. Then it hit me!

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        • #5
          Oh dear, Sharon - I fear the country girl has struck out with this one, because they are edible. We have a televison chef/personality called Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall who has recently sparked a revival in self-sufficiency and he featured puffball mushrooms in one of his River Cottage programmes. This link has a couple of recipes, and there's a bit more here.

          I can remember when I was little and my dad worked at an airbase. When he got a chance, he'd wander over the airfield looking for these and field mushrooms. The field mushrooms were the tastiest but the puffballs were certainly edible.

          Puffballs normally form a huge circle, a bit like natural ancient standing stones .

          Gill
          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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          • #6
            puffballs

            As a child we would find them in the bush on our 200 acre farm. Sometimes they would be as big as an oversized basketball.
            Mom would cut them up into cubes and fry them in butter. mmmmmmm

            You will want to pick them when they are still firm and very white. They will sound hollow when you thump on them. They will only explode if they are turning brown, then they are fun to pop!

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            • #7
              MMMMMMMmmm i am so jelous. i love musrooms. I wish we had them here. big as baskit balls. mmmmmm your so lucky.

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              • #8
                HEY i LEARNED SOMETHING NEW TODAY --but I think I will just be content with puffing them
                Sharon

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                • #9
                  When they got big and brownish, we would kick them to watch the spores scatter - I guess we were "reseeding" them. The ones we ate were pure white and usually smaller - but usually bigger than a softball.
                  Gill - they used to call those big rings of fungi "fairy rings". Now I guess the meaning has changed too much to risk it. The ring effect happens because the underground parts (the mycelia) spread out from a central part, and when they get to a certain maturity, they produce the fruiting body (mushroom, puffball, whatever) above ground - at about the same time - hence - the ring. I still look at them in amazement - nature is soooo cool.
                  Sandy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sheltiecarver
                    When they got big and brownish, we would kick them to watch the spores scatter - I guess we were "reseeding" them. The ones we ate were pure white and usually smaller - but usually bigger than a softball.
                    Gill - they used to call those big rings of fungi "fairy rings". Now I guess the meaning has changed too much to risk it. The ring effect happens because the underground parts (the mycelia) spread out from a central part, and when they get to a certain maturity, they produce the fruiting body (mushroom, puffball, whatever) above ground - at about the same time - hence - the ring. I still look at them in amazement - nature is soooo cool.
                    Sandy
                    Wow - thanks for explaining that. One of our fields is full of fairy rings, and we have had loads of mushrooms this year (must be something to do with the weather), but I was wondering what caused the rings, and why the mushrooms only grow on the dark part of the ring - now I know!

                    Regards

                    Gary
                    Gary

                    My saw - Axminster AWSF18

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                    • #11
                      And you thought you would only learn about scrollsawing!!!!! Dale
                      Dale w/ yella saws

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                      • #12
                        I have never eaten puffballs before, but less than 10 miles away is a community called Popkum.
                        That is the Salish word for puffball. I may have to check some out.
                        CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                        "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                        Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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                        • #13
                          Hi Carl

                          What's this language "Salish"? I've never heard of it and I'm curious.

                          Gill
                          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                          • #14
                            The First Nations in this area, Native Indians, belong to a band of nations called the Coast Salish
                            A sub catagory, is called Stó:lo. Translated it means People of the River.
                            The river being the Fraser River.

                            There is a good book on the Stó:lo people by Douglas and McIntyre
                            http://www.douglas-mcintyre.com/book_details.asp?b=572

                            Do a google for either Coast Salish or Sto Lo and you will find tons of info Gill.
                            CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
                            "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
                            Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

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