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  • SharonW0111
    replied
    Gill - that is the recipe we used too. try cooking with bacon in your green beans ,peas ( except english or sweet ) any bean -- heavenaly- we also used the same recipe with out the sugar to make saly pork or fat back as some call it- great for seasoning too.
    Fred try the fries - if you don't think about what you are eating you will like it. then it won't bother you after that and you'll be a fan of them also. by the way --you can send me a order or two anytime
    Sharon

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  • Gill
    replied
    Hi Pete

    If you should have difficulty getting hold of saltpeter, it's worth checking out a certain online auction .

    As you say, you can use that cure on any cut of pork. I've cured 3" thick loin quite successfully.

    I've never made corned beef. Over here we can buy canned corned beef but it's not the same as what you're describing. I've used brisket before to make a pickled beef which is very tasty - unfortunately, I don't have the recipe on my computer.

    Gill

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  • Woodbutcher68
    replied
    Sharon,
    There's a bar just West of Chicago that has a Turkey Testicle Festival every Fall. I've never been there and have no plans to, but I'm sure you'd love it!
    And I agree on the use of Pork fat. Like Emeril says: "Pork Fat Rules!"

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  • PeteB
    replied
    Solid gold, Gill! What I like about it is that any cut of pork can be used, right? It would be a break from the regular stripey American bacon (which can be very good, but expensive, too).

    I'd like to try home-made corned beef, too, using tongue, the round, or a sirloin tip instead of the customary brisket.

    Thanks!

    Pete

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  • Gill
    replied
    Well, I have to confess I adore blood (black) pudding! It's rare that I eat it though, because it's so fattening . Nowadays we're not allowed to use real blood for black pudding because the European Union is worried about it posing a health risk . Nevertheless, whatever the commercial producers use as a substitute is just as tasty . I've got a feeling there may still be some individual butchers who stick to the old ways, but they're very few and far between.

    Here's the bacon recipe I use. There are so many good bacon producers in North America, though, that I suspect there are better recipes easily available.
    BASIC CURING MIX

    8lb salt
    2oz saltpetre
    2lb sugar (use whatever you fancy, different sugar, different taste).
    Mix this all together well.

    Use 1½oz of the cure to each pound of meat. As far as curing time, use the inch theory: 7 days for each inch thickness of meat i.e. 21 days for 3 inches of meat. Might need longer, might be shorter, a matter of experience and taste.

    Get together the appropriate weight of cure, use half for the first part of the process, rub in well. Put the meat into a good quality plastic bag. Put a layer of mix in the bottom of the bag then place the meat on top of this, tie the bag up tightly, making sure all the air is excluded. Keep the curing temperature around 40/42F (I put mine in the fridge).

    After about four days a lot of body fluids will have leached out, so undo the bag(s), drain the fluid off, remove and re-salt the meat. DO NOT overdo this, just a light covering, return to the bag and retie.

    When the meat has finished it’s curing time, remove it from the bag, wash thoroughly in clean water, put string through one end and hang it up to dry. The temperature should be around 50F, there should be a through current and not in direct sunlight. This should take about one week to dry off and equalise. However, this summer I just left my bacon uncovered in the fridge after washing it, and it seemed to dry out fine.
    I found that the bacon was much easier to slice with an electric slicer if you leave the rind on throughout the curing process.

    I love bacon when it's cut into very small pieces, fried until crispy, and mixed with pesto sauce. Then I add some cooked and quartered brussels sprouts and mix it all with freshly cooked pasta. It may sound like an unlikely combination, but it tastes gorgeous and it's a great way to get people who hate sprouts to eat them.

    Gill

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  • PeteB
    replied
    Gill,

    Your sausages look like they are to die for, with either mashed potatoes and onion gravy or Yorkshire pudding. Heck, why not both? My mom is of old Yankee stock and her cooking was very English up until recent years, no thanks to Weight Watchers, so Yorkshire pudding was often served with roast beef, another dish we see too little of lately.

    Re: organ meats, I am not a fan of them generally but when selected carefully and prepared properly they can be yummy. Very thinly sliced calve's liver sauteed lightly with crisp bacon and fried onions, for example, or crisply fried sweetbreads (thymus gland). I've had haggis courtesy of a Scottish friend and it was terrific. Have never had any of any animal's family jewels, though. Sharon seems to have a particular relish for these, and it's not piccalilli. I've followed your MIRACULOUS recovery, Sharon, and am glad to see you back.

    So, Gill, can you tell us how you make bacon? I had lots of bacon in Ireland (probably similar) and it was nothing like US bacon but very lean like Canadian bacon. I'd love to know how to make it.

    Pete

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  • Taffy Turner
    replied
    Individual Yorkshire puddings are definately the way to go!!!!

    My Grandmother used to swear by making the batter the day before and leaving it in the fridge overnight.

    Her Yokshire puddings were the best ever - about the size of a cricket ball (or baseball depending on which side of the pond you live!), and completely hollow - light as a feather.

    If you have any left over, you can slice them in half and put a slice of cold beef with a little hot mustard in them - kind of like a sandwich.

    Regards

    Gary

    (Today's culinary tips were brought to you courtesy of Taffy Turner, who gets lost if he ever wanders into the kitchen by mistake!!!!!)

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  • bearfretworks
    replied
    Originally posted by workin for wood
    will you marry me and cook my dinner?
    Careful what you ask for......Gill may COOK the dinner, but I'm afraid Sharon will provide the main course........ For some reason, my legs ARE crossed......

    Oh yeah, food...... I'll take fresh dall sheep or mountain goat ribs cooked over coals halfway to heaven on an Alaska mountain..... Ya'll can keep your kidneys and blood pudding on the other side of the puddle!

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  • SharonW0111
    replied
    Last week when I was finally allowed food the thing I asked for were french fries -- don't know why but during my dialialisis all I could think of were fries.. I got them too- they had the kitchen fry me up a big plate- took me a while but I ate every last one

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  • Marcel in Longueuil
    replied
    Lamb kidneys pan cooked in a wine sauce, mmmm.

    Veal liver: As a kid I couldn't stand it, and had to eat it on doctor's orders according to my mom (Had mononucleosis at the age of 6, and the doctor said I needed iron) dipped in flour then fried in a pan. Today I like it.

    Blood sausages, my wife likes them, I never did.

    But the thing that will make me sick every time someone made me try to eat it: Canned spaghetti (or any canned pasta). And my wife loves to eat it cold out of the can (Shuddering) especially Ravioli.

    Give me French fries and a Rib steak any day, or Oriental cuisine; I love vietnamese and Szechuan.

    I'm hungry,
    Marcel

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  • SharonW0111
    replied
    Marc- a castration is done on a young calf at about a month old -- no biggy if you hold the tail straight over his back -then he is called a sterr -lol- a castrated rooster is done young also -- then he is called a capon .I can sex a day old chick to and he doesn't even show me his --- well i wont say nose roflmao
    Love ya.

    Sorry but I am pure country - just in case it didn't show - I am a Texas cow girl

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  • SharonW0111
    replied
    iF THIS IS A REPEAT IGNORE FIRST PART-- i GOT EXCITED AND ACDIENTLY SENT THE FIRST REPLY SOMEWHERE -- darn fingers -- Anyway I was trying to tell you to be sure and keep some of the rind on your bacon,, it sure is good to chew on lol -- but to shorten this - Don't use any animal fat except for pork please-- others tend to go rancid and causes a lot of trouble on your works--besides it isn't good for you -- taste good but isn't. I have been warned about eating the intrals of any animal - I love calf liver and onions.. seems a lot of toxiemia posioning comes from there.. believe me that isn't fun either.. besides it is all high colestrole.. I could talk food for hours but I won't -making me hungrey for my good food I cant have any more --drats. Let me know how you do on your bacon and are you going to sugar cure or smoke it ..here the potted hog head is called souse-- nasty stuff myself had to help make it and I ant eattin all that is in it lol.. Take care and let me hear

    Sharon

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  • CanadianScroller
    replied
    I have eaten on both sides of the pond.
    I was raised on all the things that people in North America tend to throw out.
    In Scotland they throw it in a stomach lining and call it haggis, which I have also had.

    I have to admit I still like a nice steak and kidney pie.
    My mom makes a good jellied pork pie with hot water pastry too.
    Sometimes in restaurants I will order Liver and onions.

    My kids do not care for the same things I do, even though they eat them all in the form of a hotdog.

    I am by no means a vegetarian but when I have to attend the slaughterhouse to read the water meter it would take no convincing at all to give up meat and eat more veggies.

    I had never had corn on the cob till I came to Canada and it is so good fresh roasted, seconds after you pick it from the stalk.

    Gills directions for Yorkshire pudding are some of the best I have seen.
    We use lard, since shortening will not produce good pudding and my wife likes pot roasts so there are no drippings saved..
    We get the oven hot enough for the lard to start to smoke.
    Put the batter in each cup and then close the door.
    Turning the oven down slowly 10 degrees at a time after the batter has risen.


    One thing I do not miss as a child is blood sausage. nuff said.

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  • Marcel in Longueuil
    replied
    Bacon???

    Bacon???

    Gill, Now that I'm interrested in.
    And Gill, you were right: I did shudder at the thought.

    Sharon, I'm glad I'm your friend. (Castrating young bulls, indeed... )

    I can imagine you doing it to a bull: it's got heft to it, but a young rooster?

    Somehow I can't help laughing at the image of that sucker looking down, freaking out and running all over the barnyard while the hens laugh their head off. (Too much Foghorn Leghorn as a kid, I guess )

    Regards,
    Marcel

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  • Gill
    replied
    Hi Sharon

    I can see why you were trying to be discrete - and I bet some of the fellas reading this thread are feeling distinctly uncomfortable now .

    Chitlins are sometimes eaten on this side of the pond but they're very much a local speciality of the South-West, where they're known as 'chitterlings'. I must confess I've never tasted them. I think the most adventurous I've ever been was to prepare and eat brawn, which is the potted meat from a pig's head. I didn't like it much.

    Last night I managed to get my other half to eat lambs kidneys for the first time. He's always been funny when it comes to eating offal, but he enjoyed these because I'd hidden them in a steak casserole. But why should we be shy about describing what goes into our food? I wonder what sort of skins are used for frankfurters and hot dogs, and if they are always as wholesome as traditional casings. In these days of genetically modified food, I'm quite keen to know what I'm eating. The scientists may be sure that all these artificially enhanced products are quite safe, but don't forget that I live in the land of Mad Cow Disease and Foot and Mouth. Heck, it seems that we have a food infection scare at least every 2 years.

    Tomorrow I'll start making some bacon . I've only just found out how to do it, and it's so easy! I made a couple of batches earlier in the summer and they tasted far better than anything commercially produced.

    Gill

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