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  • #16
    LOL! Sharon, your great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Dale w/ yella saws

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    • #17
      Whilst I appreciate your input, Sharon, the whole point of the cold smoking project is to flavor the food with smoke, not cook it. I can see why you think I've misunderstood the concept of a barbecue, because barbecues hot cook meat which is eaten on the spot. Perhaps I should have started a separate thread; I considered doing so but thought that this project was so closely related to barbecues that it was appropriate to post here. Ah well... my mistake.

      Anyone who makes their own meat produce (or a fisherman who catches a glut) which they wish to preserve or flavor should find the cold smoker quite useful.

      Gill
      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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      • #18
        Sorry for my misunderstanding Gill -- smoking and bbq are totly different- we smoke meats here too but I find that meat doesn't burn as well tabaccy in my pipe -- yuck yuck yuck -- sorry for the pun but I couldn't resist
        Sharon

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        • #19
          Gill,

          What temperature do you "cold smoke" things at? This looks pretty neat and I always wondered how to smoke cheese.

          When I smoke meat it's over a warm fire but too hot for cheese.
          Dan

          -Just do'in the best I can every day

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          • #20
            Originally posted by SharonW0111
            Sorry for my misunderstanding Gill -- smoking and bbq are totly different- we smoke meats here too but I find that meat doesn't burn as well tabaccy in my pipe -- yuck yuck yuck -- sorry for the pun but I couldn't resist
            Sharon
            Sharon, you're too funny. How do you get that meat into your pipe for smoking?

            I can picture you with a corn cob pipe stuffing a roast into it for smoking.
            Kelly
            "All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them." Walt Disney

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            • #21
              Hi Dan

              60F-80F is the ideal temperature range. But it'll take you ages to smoke a whole cheese.

              Hi Sharon

              I'd love to see you roll your own - sausage rolls, perhaps ?


              Gill
              There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
              (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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              • #22
                Growing up poor in the SE Tennesse mtns it didn't really matter what cut or what animal it came from. (Deer, Boar, cow) It was cooked in a crockpot and it was shreaded BBQ sandwiches. And it always had Hotslaw on it. I haven't seen it anywhere but this small community and everyone eats it. Good on hotdogs and sausage.

                4 c shredded cabbage

                mix following and pour over cabbage and mix well
                1/2 tbsp mayo
                5 tbsp mustard
                1/2 tsp each salt n pepper
                3 tbsp vinegar
                1 tbsp sugar
                hot pepper to taste (I usually use 5-6 pickled cayenne or jalapeno depending on taste.

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                • #23
                  Coleslaw is too bland for my taste - the hotslaw recipe is definitely one I'll be trying out .

                  Believe it or not, I pickled some habaneros and jalapeno chillies a couple of years ago and I've been wondering what to do with them ever since. The habaneros are pretty powerful so I might not add quite so many to the hotslaw.



                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                  • #24
                    When I cut Hickory, Maple, Cherry, or Oak, I save the scraps and put them in seperate bags and use them in my electric smoker or the smoke box on my gas grill. Why buy something I already have?
                    Fred


                    There's a fine line between woodworking and insanity, I'm just not sure which side of the line I'm on!

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                    • #25
                      A quick question about the Hot Slaw; what sort of mustard do you use? I'm guessing it's pre-mixed and ready to use, but I'm not sure.

                      Gill
                      There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                      (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                      • #26
                        Yes. Regular off the shelf mustard in a jar. Don't use any brown or spicy, it will have a different flavor. Also is best to let sit a couple hours for the cabbage to soften a little and flavor to sink in.

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                        • #27
                          I tried the Hot Slaw today with pork ribs in Hoi Sin sauce and some rice. It's gorgeous ! Many thanks for the recipe.

                          Gill
                          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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                          • #28
                            A few thoughts and definitions from a backyard griller (mostly).

                            I used to own a charcoal grill, but I found it tedious to use and a pain to get rid of the ash. I have been using a gas grill (propane) for years now and can grill, bbq and add smoke flavor on it. No long heat up time, or messy cleanup either.

                            Grilling is cooking on high or moderately high heat. You can add smoke flavor when grilling by soaking some wood fragments in water for an hour or so, wrapping them in some Al foil, poking a few holes in the top of the foil package and putting it on the burners. Not messy but does make for smoke. Not good for long term smoking unless you keep adding packages of wood. The offcuts from my scrolling and woodworking make for some interesting smoke flavors but be careful because some species of wood produce harmful fumes. Oak, maple, and fruitwoods are very good as is hickory and other nut woods. Mesquite is very strongly flavored but favored in the SW US.

                            BBqing is done at a lower heat with a sauce or marinade that is brushed onto the meat before and during the slower cooking. You can also add smoke flavor as above, but why ruin a good marinade.

                            Slow cooking is done over indirect heat over either charcoal or wood or on a gas grill by not turning on some of the burners. It may involve either a dry rub or bbq sauce. Smoke is optional.

                            Smoking is done over wood or charcoal at very low temperatures for a very long time, 12-48 hours or so, in a basically closed box.

                            Rain, snow, sleet, cold, hot, dry, humid, winter, summer, spring, fall... who cares. Your method depends on your equipment and your druthers, but good friends and relatives to share it with make it much more enjoyable.
                            A day without sawdust is a day without sunshine.
                            George

                            delta 650, hawk G426

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