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  • computers and scrolling?

    Everyone knows that the pleasure of scrolling comes from the hands on experience. Otherwise we would all be using laser etching.

    OK I stumbled upon a site again. This is for a home made computerized embroidery machine. It would be so easy to switch it to scrolling.

    I know I should be drummed off the site for this suggestion but it sure would be cool.
    CAЯL HIRD-RUTTEЯ
    "proud member of the best scroll sawing forum on the net."
    Ryobi SC180VS scroll saw EX21

  • #2
    It would be great to have one that could manouver a router !

    I'd happily pay for someone to make me one of those. Imagine all the hard work you could get it do, such as preparing frames and base boards whilst you got on with the more artistic stuff.

    Gill
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

    Comment


    • #3
      Carl that site spoke in a langue I couldn't understand -- but I do miss myembrodry machine -- want to make me one??
      Now as far as router goes Gill-- I just wish some would teach me how to use mine without a lot of wood being torn up - yes I am going the right way --it's just bigger than I am
      Sharon

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Gill
        It would be great to have one that could manouver a router !

        I'd happily pay for someone to make me one of those. Imagine all the hard work you could get it do, such as preparing frames and base boards whilst you got on with the more artistic stuff.

        Gill
        You can purchase a CNC router for abuot $5000 US. The smallest bit available for them currently is 1/32". Typically, they can handle a sheet up to 4' X 8'.

        Kevin
        Kevin
        Scrollsaw Patterns Online
        Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey Carl,

          I could help in building that. I have considerable knowledge in drilling the same types of holes I see on that board.

          But I agree with Sharon here, That QBasic stuff would need to be translated into Englisheese.

          Paul S.

          Paul S.

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          • #6
            Unfortunately, $5000 is a little beyond my means . If only I could get a cheap one at $4995. Still, knowing how much you despise the automation process, Kevin, it's nice of you take an interest . I've asked about making one on a computer support forum, and it'll be interesting to see if anyone's prepared to hold my hand through the process.

            Sharon - when I get tear-out with a router it's usually because I'm trying to take off too much wood in a single pass. It also happens sometimes when I'm routing end grain, so I always route end grain first, knowing that any tear-out will be into wood that's going to be removed later.

            Gill
            There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
            (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Gill -- I'll try that next time I get brave enough to turn my router table on --lol .. I just get all teary eyed wasting good wood -I have my router in a table for stability so I know it is just the operator ..
              Sharon

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Gill
                Unfortunately, $5000 is a little beyond my means . If only I could get a cheap one at $4995. Still, knowing how much you despise the automation process, Kevin, it's nice of you take an interest . I've asked about making one on a computer support forum, and it'll be interesting to see if anyone's prepared to hold my hand through the process.

                Gill
                Well, actually, they're advertised in PW, Wood, and most woodworking mags for $4995 so I guess you'll be ordering one soon.
                I'm not sure why you think I despise automation, I think it's great if you're mass-producing goods. We have several hundred CNC's of varying types where I work, and manufacture tens of thousands of items to incredibly tight tolerances (some as low as 25 millionths). Automation is the only way American Manufacturers can compete with the Far-east. My only issue arises as when people try to pass off stuff done on a CNC as hand-made and get by the juries of higher end craft fairs with it. If the furniture side of my business were to take off where I wanted to add 3-D embellishments to dressers and such, I would definately spring for a CNC router.

                Kevin
                Kevin
                Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

                Comment


                • #9
                  Fair enough, Kevin . In another thread I mentioned CNC machines and I got the impression you objected to them. Now I understand where you're coming from.

                  Gill
                  There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
                  (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not so fast Gil !

                    You don't really know just how deep you can get into this DNC (or CNC) stuff. I will presume JediScroller will jump in if I say something out of line.

                    First you sink your money into the X-Y-Z motion controller of the Router. But after a while, you begin to see the advantages, of say being able to change the router bits automatically with commands to the machine.

                    Then you begin to glimpse the advantages of being able to convert a plan, drawing, or pattern from a magazine directly into machine code to control the router and its position. (Trust me, manually entering the machine commands directly is painful.)

                    Low a behold you discover what you now really need is a computer testing of how your router is going to cut, and create the machine code to carry out the specific cut pattern of the tool path. For example, when the router comes too close to a hold down, can you automatically by machine code undo the specific hold down, move the hold down out of the way, and then when the router moves away move the hold down back in position and re-clamp the work piece?

                    But of course your computer is now too old and slow, and you need an upgrade plus a 21inch flat-screen LCD monitor.

                    Now you have outgrown your original investment in DNC tooling and you now need to upgrade that. Unfortunately you now find your software is now incompatible with the machine center upgrade. Not that full package AutoCAD 3-D has a steep learning curve or anything. You try to keep your copy of MasterCAM running, but it is a loosing battle.

                    And around and around you go.

                    Oh, and did I mention, that as a business owner, you no longer have time to program the software because you are trying to drum up sales to pay for all this 'geek' junk. So, now you spend all your free time dealing with employees and their problems which require them to take time off. Then the Government safety inspectors stop by for a quiet chat over tea. You know, the 'chat' that is like IG inspection back in your AF days?

                    Yes, isn't technology a wonderful thing?

                    (tongue-in-cheek)
                    Phil

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Phil,
                      You've been watching me, haven't you? hehehe.

                      Kevin (who just upgraded to allow the use of the new auto-cad and still uses cad-key for 3-d rendering, LOL)
                      Kevin
                      Scrollsaw Patterns Online
                      Making holes in wood with an EX-30, Craftsman 16" VS, Dremel 1680 and 1671

                      Comment

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