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  • Question for Gill

    Gill,
    Which of your 5 scroll saws do use most and why?

    Rhys H.

  • #2
    Hi Rhys

    It's easier to tell you which saws I tend not to use !

    The Spiralux isn't a saw for a serious woodworker. It vibrates, and cannot cut wood that's much thicker than 1/4" ply. That said, this saw was my first and introduced me to scrolling. It gave me the confidence that I could cut wood without chopping my fingers off; moreover, it gave quality results and I actually sold earrings that I designed and cut with it*. I'd recommend it strongly as a cheap and safe way to introduce children (or those who are nervous about using power tools) to scrolling.

    I rarely use the Hegner 1 because I've got a Hegner 2 which has a deeper throat, a variable speed and a quick tension release lever. This is my saw of choice if I'm cutting a project which requires a lot of piercing cuts.

    Finally, I use the Diamond which is fitted with the Type 7 blade holder for the bulk of my work. It's great for large projects due to the 24" throat and rotating blade holder, plus it feels so sturdy. I can stack cut up to 4" thick (IIRC), although so far I've only ever tried to cut 3". If I want, I can slow the saw down to less than 1 stroke per second. The slowness of cut can be very useful at times.

    My one criticism of the Diamond (and it's a big criticism) is that it lacks a quick tension release lever. Blade changes are certainly quick, although I don't know if I'll ever change a blade quite as fast as the website says. However, the process of untensioning and tensioning the blade can take up to 20 seconds. Compare that to the Hegner 2 which just needs a flick of a lever.

    Gill

    * The other day I actually found some of these earrings lurking in an old box that had been lost in the loft. I'll have to photograph them and post the pictures here.
    Last edited by Gill; 03-30-2006, 06:10 PM.
    There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
    (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

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    • #3
      Gill,
      Thanks for that detailed anaylsis.

      I started with a Ryobi single speed saw which was just awful. I did not know anything about scroll saws and just presumed that that was the way it was. I then saw a Makita in a second hand shop which had variable speed and I figured that this had to be the ultimate. I used it for a couple of years becoming more frustrated with the blade changing as time went on and finally having variable speed problems which were going to cost more than the machine was worth to fix. About this time I stumbled on this forum and quickly realised that life could be a lot better when using good equipment and I settled on a Hegner which I imported from Australia. I really have not had a niggle about it since I bought it.
      Anyway thanks for your answer.

      Rhys H.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Rhys

        I quite agree that Hegners are superb saws (what model is yours?) and it's always a toss up for me as which gets used - the Hegner 2 or the Diamond. As I said, from a purely woodworking point of view I decide according to the number of piercing cuts I'll be making. From a practical point of view, I can only set up one saw at a time on my workstation and they're flipping heavy to move. So I've got a distinct tendency to use whichever saw is already in position !

        A few years ago my old Hegner 1 was in need of maintenance, having been stored in an outhouse. I took it down to Hegner UK in Hailsham and they overhauled it for a minimal charge whilst I waited. That's not as good as the service Doug Woodward has offered me (depending on the task, he may not charge at all) but it was nevertheless very impressive. If you ever do have problems with your Hegner, Rhys, I'm sure Hegner will be very helpful. But is there a service centre in the Antipodes?

        Gill
        There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
        (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Some lunatic
          The other day I actually found some of these earrings lurking in an old box that had been lost in the loft. I'll have to photograph them and post the pictures here.
          If anyone hasn't encountered the Spiralux before, there's one on Ebay here. They seem to pop up on Ebay quite regularly and aren't terribly expensive.

          I wish I was a decent photographer, but I've gone ahead and attached photographs of some earrings as promised. Please bear in mind that these were very early projects . Anyway, I'm sure a child would have loads of fun making similar little whimsies and might just catch the woodworking bug.

          Gill
          Attached Files
          There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
          (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

          Comment


          • #6
            Gill,
            I think you're way too modest about those earrings - they're cute as can be! They seem awfully small - so far, I've found kids to be not so good with the little fiddly things as they are with bigger, less complex stuff.
            However, I'm thinking that they would be absolutely perfect for introducing a group of totally beginner women to power tools. I have just such a group in mind - OK if I "borrow" your idea?
            Thanks,
            Sandy

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Sandy

              I'd be seriously flattered if you adopted my idea ! I'd even email you my patterns (if I can find them ) to get you started. However, you may also wish to have a go at making your own patterns - they're very easy. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for your new group - let's hope it's successful.

              Point taken about the earrings being too small for kiddies. Nevertheless, there's no reason why patterns such as these couldn't be scaled up a little bit.

              Gill
              There is no opinion, however absurd, which men will not readily embrace as soon as they can be brought to the conviction that it is readily adopted.
              (Schopenhauer, Die Kunst Recht zu Behalten)

              Comment


              • #8
                Hegners in NZ

                Gill,
                Were I an ear ring wearer I would be very happy to wear yours!!

                My Hegner is the Multicut 2S. It has a 450mm throat with of course the electronic variable speed. I had to buy mine from Australia as there does not appear to be an importer in New Zealand. (well, I could not locate one)
                Carbatec sell Delta saws and the only other saws available are the cheap "Taiwanese" style which just don't foot it for me.

                Rhys H.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Gill; Your earings are very nice. I have tried and designed some patterns, some were small, and others were larger. They all looked good, but didn't sell many of them. Thanks for your pictures. Bob
                  Be the good,
                  you want to see in the world...

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