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  • #46
    Hi Kathy,
    I have just started cutting the Calf Roper, I am almost done cutting the calf and just realized I should have used 1 1/4" thick walnut, most of the wood I can find is 3/4" , if I continue with this thickness will it make that much of a difference to the project?
    Since I have just started, I can cut the calf over again if I need to. Do you have any suggestions where to get thicker wood or should I glue up 3/4"and 1/2" wood for the thickness? Or do I really need to? Thanks for your help.
    Shirley

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    • #47
      Hi Shirley,
      If you glue up 3/4" and 1/2" wood you will have a much more 3 dimensional project. You can make it with just the 3/4" and it will still look nice , just not as much depth. I cut most of my own wood and send it to a mill for kiln drying, so I make sure I have some thick pieces that are 1 1/4- or even up to 2" thick for certain projects. If you can find a small local mill near your area, you may be able to find the thicker wood or order some. Since you already have the calf cut out of 3/4" , I'd continue with that. If you like, try putting a 1/2" shim under it just to see the different effect that more thickness would give..
      . Hope this helps. Kathy

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      • #48
        Thanks Sally, It was a pleasure having you in class.
        I haven't checked this message board in a long time... sorry for the delay!
        Kathy

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        • #49
          Oh my gosh! I didn't know Kathy gave classes. I've bookmarked her site -
          T
          Theresa

          http://WoodNGoods.weebly.com

          http://woodngoods.blogspot.com

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          • #50
            [email protected] go to my workshop page on my site for comments from other students Intarsia Woodworking & Patterns by Kathy Wise Home page thanks, Kathy

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            • #51
              Hi Kathy,
              I am working on the Calf Roper, I am sanding the calf, do I need to make it look more rounded on the belly area and if so how do you accomplish that? I have seen some intarsia projects displayed at my local WoodCraft store and they seem to have a more rounded look, but I can't seem to get that kind of look on larger pieces, any hints or do i need to leave them flatter looking. Here are a couple of pictures ,please let me know if I need to do anything different, thanks!
              Attached Files
              Last edited by scrollnaway49; 02-05-2010, 06:20 AM.

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              • #52
                HI , It looks like you have a nice start. Just round the bottom of the belly a bit more, but keep it above the feet. If you have to make the feet lower do to get the rounded look , do so. also put a sharper angle on the belly piece just behind the shoulders. it will make the shoulders stand out a bit more. Sand down the neck area so the shoulder and head is higher. If you have a dog at home, take a look at the way the shoulder and hind quarters are higher than the belly and neck area. Good luck , you are doing fine. Kathy

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                • #53
                  Hi Kathy,
                  The Roper project is moving alon,, but I have a question about the size wood used for the head and bridal, the pattern called for a 1" wood for the bridal yet the horse head was wider which is causing a gap to show ,, I am having to try an hide it,but having alot of problems, I had to sand the back of the head to meet where the halter ended,, is there a better way of doing this?
                  Thanks for any suggestions or help on this
                  Shirley
                  Attached Files

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                  • #54
                    Hi, This is quite a complex pattern. It looks like your cut on the horse head was not square... when you cut thick wood like walnut it is easy to push too hard and bend the blade resulting in an slanted edge. As you sand pieces down the gap becomes more pronounced. You can try to get a straight edge back on your pieces by using an oscillating sander, but it will be difficult to fit as you alter the shape. It may be best to cut the head pieces again and go slower this time so your blade will not slant. It is not a good idea to sand the bottom of any pieces... Don’t' be discouraged....it will come together for you if you don't quit.

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